HB2, News

Gov. Cooper pledges to issue ‘comprehensive’ executive order protecting LGBTQ individuals

Gov. Roy Cooper told a group of people at the Center for American Progress’ Ideas Conference in Washington D.C. that he plans to issue an executive order to increase protections for the LGBTQ community in North Carolina, according to The Huffington Post.

“I’m going to issue an executive order pretty soon that is comprehensive, that helps with LGBT protections and we’re going to keep working every day,” he said during the Center for American Progress’ Ideas Conference.

Cooper’s office told HuffPost they could not immediately give additional details about the order. His office was not immediately available for a similar request from NC Policy Watch.

His vow to issue the order comes in the wake of House Bill 142, which repealed HB2, the state’s sweeping anti-LGBTQ legislation, but replaced it with language that bans local governments from enacting future anti-discrimination protections until 2020.

The new law also states that the General Assembly will dictate future bathroom policies.

The Huffington Post reports what Cooper told folks at the conference about his role in HB2’s repeal compromise — a move that was criticized by LGBTQ and civil rights organizations.

On Tuesday, Cooper said he wanted a clean repeal without a compromise but didn’t think it would be feasible, since North Carolina’s Republican-controlled legislature operates under the Hastert Rule. That means one has to have the majority of one’s own party to get anything considered on the floor.

“I had a choice. Do I continue to make a statement and pound the table and nothing happen? Or do I take a positive step, make progress and continue to fight?” he said. “I chose the latter for my state because we got rid of the birth certificate requirement. We opened up the ability of local governments to provide some protections now and some in the future.”

You can read the full article here.

Below is a video of Cooper at the Conference.

HB2, News

Chris Sgro stepping down as Executive Director Equality N.C.

 

Chris Sgro, executive director of Equality North Carolina.advocacy group announced this morning its executive director, Chris Sgro, is stepping down after nearly four years.LGBTQ advocacy group announced this morning its executive director, Chris Sgro, is stepping down after nearly four years.

LGBTQ advocacy group Equality North Carolina announced this morning its executive director, Chris Sgro, is stepping down after nearly four years.

Sgro is moving to Washington, D.C. to become Director of Communications with the Human Rights Campaign.

Sgro became widely known as one of the faces of the struggle against HB2, even briefly serving in the N.C. House as the General Assembly’s only out gay member when he finished the term of late Rep. Ralph Johnson (D-Guilford).

“Serving as Executive Director of Equality North Carolina for nearly four years has been an honor for me,” Sgro said in a statement Friday morning. “Together, we have accomplished so much. I realize that there is much left to be done to achieve true equality across the state, and I know that the talented staff and committed board of directors will continue to work with LGBTQ North Carolinians, day after day, to fight against discrimination from Murphy to Manteo. ”

“Equality North Carolina has never been about me,” Sgro said. ” Equality NC is the oldest state-based LGBTQ equality group in the country, and since its founding, its mission has been to advance both the legal and lived equality of LGBTQ North Carolinians. Equality NC has never been stronger than it is today because our community stepped up during the HB2 battle to stand with us to fight discrimination in our state. We will always stand with them.”

Equality NC credited Sgro with helping to build “a permanent coalition of over 500 pro-equality business voices, [grow] a faith program focused on building a group of affirming faith leaders in both urban and rural parts of the state, and [hiring] the organization’s first-ever Director of Transgender Policy.”

The group’s board of directors are beginning a national search for Sgro’s successor.

Sgro’s announcement comes the same week Rev. William Barber, the nationally renowned leader of the NC NAACP, announced he would step down to begin a new national poor peoples’ campaign in the vein of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

 

 

Courts & the Law, HB2, News

Plaintiffs in HB2 lawsuit intend to challenge HB142; defendants won’t take position on law until it’s filed

The lawsuit over House Bill 2 is at a standstill until the plaintiffs file an amended complaint to include a challenge to HB142, which repealed the sweeping anti-LGBTQ law and replaced it with different discriminatory language.

A report was filed with the federal court Friday with updates on the case from all parties involved, including their positions, or lack thereof, on moving forward.

In the document, the plaintiffs — Joaquin Carcaño, Payton Grey McGarry, Angela Gilmore, Hunter Schafer, Beverly Newell and Kelly Trent — state they intend to file an amended complaint asserting federal constitutional and statutory claims against HB142.

The plaintiffs are represented by the ACLU and Lambda Legal.

A couple paragraphs from the report give a preview of what might be included in the amended complaint:

“Although H.B. 142 purports to ‘repeal’ H.B. 2, in actuality H.B. 142 perpetuates many of H.B. 2’s harms, as well as H.B. 2’s stigmatization of transgender individuals and those who are lesbian, gay, or bisexual
(collectively “LGBT” people).

H.B. 142 discriminates against transgender individuals in exercising one of life’s most basic and essential functions: using the restroom. Under Section 2 of H.B. 142, state agencies and local governments are forbidden from establishing—and transgender individuals are barred from obtaining the protection of—policies ensuring the right of transgender individuals to use the restroom or other single-sex, multi-user facilities consistent with their gender identity. Further, until December 2020, Sections 3 and 4 of H.B. 142 block local governments from protecting LGBT people against discrimination in employment and public accommodations. By targeting all LGBT people for disfavored treatment and singling out transgender individuals for additional discrimination, H.B. 142 violates the most basic guarantees of equal treatment and due process under the U.S. Constitution.”

The defendants in the case — the University of North Carolina, legislative leaders and Gov. Roy Cooper — state in the report that it would be premature to take a position on HB142 before an amended complaint is filed with the court.

Cooper states in the filing that he “may be in position to consent to Plaintiffs’ filing of a Fourth Amended Complaint, and intends to proceed as appropriate thereafter depending on the nature of the allegations.”

You can read the full document here.

Governor Roy Cooper, HB2, News

New Elon Poll on Cooper approval, HB2, medical marijuana

The latest Elon University Poll results give a look at North Carolinians’ views on Gov. Roy Cooper, the General Assembly, the effect of HB2 on the state’s reputation and the question of legalizing marijuana.

The live-caller, dual frame (landline and cell phone) survey of 506 likely voters was conducted from April 18-21. The latest released results feature responses from registered voters classified as likely voters in the Nov. 8 election and has a margin of error of +/- 4.36 percentage points.

The poll found that nearly half of respondents approve of the job Roy Cooper is doing as governor.

“Governor Cooper is clearly enjoying a honeymoon period of public support in North Carolina,” said Jason Husser, director of the Elon Poll, in a release Tuesday. “That he is 19 points net positive in an otherwise divided state gives him some leeway to use soft power even as the legal powers of the office have recently declined.”

“Governor McCrory had positive approval numbers very similar to Governor Cooper’s when the Elon Poll first asked about McCrory’s job performance in April 2013,” Husser said. “Governors have a tendency to become less popular over time. However, Cooper is currently in a strong position to craft a solid foundation of support in North Carolina.”

Of course, Cooper’s approval is split by party.

Seventy percent of Democrats said they approve the job he is doing while just 24 percent of Republicans said they approve. Half of independent voters – a large and growing group of voters in North Carolina – said they approve of Cooper’s performance.

The North Carolina General Assembly did not fair as well in the poll. Fifty-four percent of respondents said they disapprove of the job the General Assembly is doing. While Democrats and black voters were the most likely to disapprove of the legislature, it’s worth noting that the poll found 38 percent of Republicans also disapprove of the job the GOP dominated legislature is doing.

In a related question, the poll asked respondents about HB2’s impact on the state’s national reputation. Sixty-five percent of respondents said they believe it has made North Carolina’s reputation worse.

There were also some interesting responses on marijuana legalization. Eighty percent of respondents said they would support legalizing marijuana for medical use while 45 percent said they would support its legalization for recreational use.

For more information from the poll – including questions on concealed carry gun permits and environmental questions – see the full poll, including more information on methodology.

Courts & the Law, Governor Roy Cooper, HB2, News

The Week’s Top Five on NC Policy Watch

1. Another look at Cooper’s doggedly impressive start

As the national pundits weigh in on President Trump’s first 100 days in office and the General Assembly careens toward its self-imposed crossover deadline for legislation, it’s worth considering how Governor Roy Cooper has fared in his first 100+ days on the job.

He reached that threshold a couple of weeks ago with little fanfare. There were a few news reports and an interview or two, but most of the political world was still assessing the fallout from the partial repeal of HB2 and monitoring the latest efforts by the General Assembly to take powers away from Cooper that previous governors have held.

The 100-day threshold also felt less noteworthy because of the way Cooper’s term began and what happened before he took the oath of office. [Read more...]

2. A flood of bad ideas
How the General Assembly is spending “crossover week” and what it ought to be doing

The last week of April arrived soggy and gray yesterday in North Carolina. It’s as if the weather gods had taken a sneak peek at the agenda for one of the busiest weeks of the year at the General Assembly and were shedding a steady stream of preemptory tears.

Yes, this is “crossover week” in Raleigh – one of those strange and obscure “inside the Legislative Building” phenomena that are, at once, difficult to fathom and highly impactful on the lives of millions of everyday North Carolinians.

Every other year, state lawmakers self-impose something known as the “crossover deadline.” The basic and not utterly unreasonable rule is that unless a bill is approved by at least one legislative body (either the Senate or the House of Representatives) by the end of this legislative week, it will be ineligible to become law this year. The idea behind “crossover,” of course, is that it provides a culling mechanism that can help a part-time legislature manage the deluge of bills (there have been 1,448 introduced so far in 2017) it needs to wade through. [Read more…]

3. Controversial charter growth bill sails through the state House

Despite criticism from the Republican chair of the State Board of Education, members of the state House of Representatives voted Thursday to clear speedy expansion for some North Carolina charters.

Under House Bill 779, charters would be able to boost their enrollment by up to 30 percent without seeking state approval, provided they have not been identified as low-performing.

The version that emerged on the House floor Thursday night included several modifications from the GOP-led bill, which had called for any charter, regardless of academic performance, to have clearance for expanding enrollment by up to 40 percent. [Read more…]

***Bonus stories from Crossover Week:

4. Republican judge on protesting bill reducing Court of Appeals: ‘There weren’t any other options’

On Monday morning, there was only one way left to save the Court of Appeals and a few hours with which to do it.

Just two days earlier, Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper vetoed House Bill 239, which would reduce the state’s appellate court from 15 judges to 12. It was expected that the Republican-led General Assembly would override that veto as soon as they could, despite a lot of opposition from both sides of the aisle.

“Every argument had been produced to no avail; statistics were provided to [legislators] by a judge from our court; … four chief justices told them this is a bad move, that this is going to hurt the courts, that this was ill-advised; our court had told them that,” said former Judge Douglas McCullough. “There was only one way left. There weren’t any other options.” [Read more…]

5. Investment firm CEO: Partial HB2 repeal was not enough

The political compromise that repealed HB2 was enough for the NCAA and ACC, both of which have returned sporting events to North Carolina.

But is disappointment with the compromise and a flurry of new anti-LGBT proposals from the General Assembly continuing to hurt the state’s reputation? And can it recover?

“I would say it’s definitely not all over with the repeal,” said Matthew Patsky, CEO of Trillium Asset Management.

With more than $2 billion under management, Trillium has offices in Boston, San Francisco, Portland, Oregon and Durham. They were part of a group of investing firms handling more than $2 trillion that warned against the economic impact of HB2 in September of last year. [Read more…]