Commentary

In case you missed it last week, it’s hard to imagine that there was a more hateful or offensive comment on the tragic murder of two Virginia journalists than the one promoted on the John Locke Foundation’s “Locker Room” blog by George Leef, Director of Research at the Pope Center for Higher Education. Here is Leef’s entire post:

“Law professor Elizabeth Price Foley nails it on Instapundit:

‘We have all encountered angry, entitled individuals like this. They aren’t just toxic to work with; they’re potentially dangerous. We typically give them wide berth, just to avoid the hurling of hurtful ‘racism!” accusations and potential violence that simmers just below the surface. Individuals like this may get reprimanded or bounced around (for the sanity of coworkers) but they rarely get fired, for fear of lawsuits.  This television station was frankly brave to fire the guy.

On a broader level, Flanagan is a sad but ineluctable product of the progressive left’s incessant race-baiting and claims of minority entitlement. He is, essentially, the love child of Al Sharpton and President Obama (with Elizabeth Warren as the surrogate).’”

Happily, Foley’s statement and Leef’s endorsement of it are so deeply offensive and downright idiotic that no one in their right mind is paying it any attention. That said, Art Pope ought to be profoundly embarrassed that any person representing a group named after his family would stoop to promoting such a monstrous comment at any time or in any place.

Commentary
McCrory_budget305-a

Gov. Pat McCrory

David Lane

American Renewal Project founder David Lane – Image: www.americanrenewalproject.org

News reports this morning indicate that Gov. Pat McCrory is distancing himself from a full page ad that ran in yesterday’s Charlotte Observer in which the Governor was quoted as inviting people to a September 26 event in Charlotte sponsored by a far right, conservative Christian group known as the American Renewal Project. The ad shows a picture of the Governor with the words:  “Come Join me in a time of worship, prayer, fasting and repentance.”

This is from McClatchy and the Winston-Salem Journal:

“The full page ad on Monday touted The Response, an event scheduled for Sept. 26.

‘Come Join Me in a time of worship, prayer, fasting and repentance,’ the ad says over McCrory’s name and beside a picture of the governor. It goes on to say the Response is ‘to call on Jesus on behalf of America that he might hear our cry and heal our land.’

In a statement, McCrory spokesman Graham Wilson said the governor had been invited to the event and agreed to speak.

A representative for the Charlotte event said the ad may have been poorly worded.”

Laying aside the questions surrounding the ad itself, however, one can’t help but wonder what the Governor was thinking when he agreed to speak at an event for such a group. As the good people at People for the American Way reported earlier this year in a lengthy post, the head of the American Renewal Project, a guy named David Lane, is a far right religious activist who wants to make the United States a “Christian nation.” Here are some excerpts:

“David Lane promotes a vision of America as a nation founded by and for Christians; denounces court rulings upholding church-state separation; calls for Christianity to be established as America’s official religion with the Bible as a primary textbook in public schools; vehemently opposes legal equality for LGBT people; and demands the impeachment of judges who rule in favor of allowing same-sex couples to be legally married.”

And this: Read More

Commentary

NLRBA lot of people are engaged in nonstandard employment today.  Whether you call it contingent work, the gig economy, the “sharing” economy or outsourcing, they are all models in which the workers who perform labor do not have a recognized employer-employee relationship with the business or entity for whom they are performing labor.  These models have become more prevalent over the last thirty years or so.  The use of temporary staffing companies to supply labor, or “temps,” is just one example.  Temps used to be mostly used for white-collar secretarial work, but they have become increasingly common for blue-collar work such as manufacturing jobs, construction and janitorial work.

Our labor and employment laws have not kept up with this changing reality of work.  But in a 3-2 decision issued last week, the National Labor Relations Board has revised its joint employment standard to reflect the reality of these new employment relationships.  In a statement released last week by the NLRB, they explained:

“The revised standard is designed ‘to better effectuate the purposes of the Act in the current economic landscape.’  With more than 2.87 million of the nation’s workers employed through temporary agencies in August 2014, the Board held that its previous joint employer standard has failed to keep pace with changes in the workplace and economic circumstances.”

The decision addressed the question of who were the employers of temporary staffing company workers and concluded that both the staffing company and the staffing company’s client where the workers were placed had sufficient control over the employees to be considered joint employers.  This is a victory for the workers and union involved because it means that the workers have a protected right to bargain with the larger company that controls the terms of their employment and not just with the staffing company.

It is also a victory for workers more broadly.  The growth of contingent employment has reduced the ability of workers to collectively bargain because layers of intermediaries have separated workers from the company that actually has power over their working conditions.  This decision — if it is not overturned when it is inevitably appealed– removes one incentive for employers to use labor intermediaries in order to avoid liability and restores a little bit of power to the workers.

News

Dr. Scott Ralls, who has led North Carolina’s Community College system for the past seven years, departs this week to take over the helm of Northern Virginia Community College.

Ralls spoke with Chris Fitzsimon over the weekend on NC Policy Watch’s radio show about what he’s achieved during his presidency and the challenges that lie ahead for North Carolina’s 58 community colleges.

Click below to hear Dr. Ralls discuss the struggle to attract and retain high-quality faculty, and the need for the state to continue to keep its community colleges as affordable as possible.

The entire interview is available as a podcast here on the main NC Policy Watch website.

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News

Note: This post has been updated to include comments about the dismissal from Wake District Attorney Lorrin Freeman.

Assault charges against R. Doyle Parrish, a member of the University of North Carolina’s Board of Governors, were dropped last week, according to court information.

R. Doyle Parrish

R. Doyle Parrish

Parrish, 61, was arrested in May and accused by Raleigh police of assaulting his wife by slapping and pushing her in a May 12 incident at the couple’s North Raleigh home.

He is the chief executive officer and co-founder of the Raleigh-based Summit Hospitality Group, which manages 17 hotels and several restaurants.

Parrish faced a misdemeanor charge of assault on a female, but the case was dismissed by prosecutors on Wednesday, according to information filed at the Wake County courthouse.

Update:

Wake County District Attorney Lorrin Freeman said Tuesday that the assault charge against Parrish was dropped because his wife Nancy Parrish, who hired an attorney of her own, was not willing to testify against her husband.

The couple has undergone counseling since the May incident and it did not appear to be a situation where there was an ongoing pattern of physical abuse, Freeman said.

“There was no indication this was an ongoing domestic violence situation,” she said.

Freeman said her office does not generally drop domestic violence cases based on victim’s cooperation alone, but did so in Doyle Parrish’s case because there was little evidence to purse the criminal case with outside of Nancy Parrish’s statements.

Freeman also said Doyle Parrish was not given any special treatment by her office. 

The court file for Parrish’s case could not be located Monday by staff at the Wake County Clerk of Courts Office.

Following his arrest, Parrish kept his seat on the UNC Board of Governors, the 32-member board that directs the state’s 17-campus university system. He did step down from committees tasked with selecting the UNC system’s next president, citing the need to take care of some personal issues.

This post will be updated if more details about the dismissed charges become available.