Charlotte Mayor Dan Clodfelter is urging his county delegation and other lawmakers to reject legislation that would dramatically scale back the authority of local governments, impacting everything from fair housing for consumers to the ability to promote better wages.

Read Clodfelter’s letter below. For more on the harms of this bill, read Allan Freyer’s post on SB 279.



As we reported earlier this morning, the General Assembly is on the cusp of dramatically scaling back the authority of local governments to protect housing consumers and promote better wages, after a late night conference committee added pages of new—and highly controversial—local government restrictions to SB 279, an essentially noncontroversial bill originally written to update the state’s occupational licensing requirements for teaching sex education. And after a closer look, the bill looks even worse than originally reported.

Many of the new restrictions are highly charged, including provisions that could allow local landlords to deny housing to veterans and seniors, permit local businesses to discriminate against their customers based on their sexual orientation, and prohibit city and county governments from passing living wage and paid sick ordinances to boost their local economies. One shocking provision may even stop local governments from requiring landlords to provide heating, air, and ventilation in their properties.

For a full list of the problematic provisions contained in the bill, follow us below the fold.

Read More

NC Budget and Tax Center

Amidst a flurry of legislation during this session’s waning hours, one provision added to HB 318 last week that would restrict how local communities deal with immigration will be heard in the House. As is so often the case with last minute bills, the real costs of this measure are not well understood, and they could be major.

The provision in question (on pages 5 and 6 of the bill) would invalidate local identification or policies that support local law enforcement efforts to achieve their goals for public safety and community building. This provision seems designed only to prevent local communities from implementing common-sense measures that protect public safety, and it could have negative consequences for local economies and local budgets.

Local public safety officials in Greensboro joined community leaders yesterday to caution state policymakers against moving ahead with this legislation.  They cited in particular the challenges it will have in helping immigrants report crimes and the likelihood that it will increase arrests as police will be unable to identify community members. A Burlington police officer shared: “If they limit the type of ID that we can accept, you’re gonna have a whole lot more people that are arrested and booked into jails tying up valuable law enforcement resources.” Read More


With lawmakers on the verge of passing controversial legislation to expand funding for charter schools at the expense of traditional public schools, yet another voice is speaking out against the proposal.

Proposed charter school bill masks true budget issues

By Amy Wamsley and Lynn Michie

There are few things that stir a dust-up among education advocates like the issue of charter schools. Even among our own board of directors and members of Western North Carolina for Public Education (WNC4PE), we don’t agree on the value and role of charter schools in our communities and our region. But one thing we all can and do agree on is that making our state’s public education budget a scrap heap for different viewpoints to fight over is not just bad public policy – it’s very bad for our children.

That’s exactly what HB539 does. It once again pits traditional public schools and charter schools against one another for funds that are hard-earned and precious. In a nutshell, HB539 would redirect a portion of funds used by traditional public schools to public charter schools during a time when all of North Carolina’s public schools are inadequately funded to meet the diverse needs of all our students.

There is no doubt that there will be vehement argument and outcry on both sides of the debate about HB539, and that debate will mask the true issue at hand: public schools, traditional or charter, in North Carolina are still woefully underfunded.

Yes, the budget just passed included some tiny gains, such as the promised raise for first-time teachers and a stay of execution for thousands of teacher assistant jobs. But the fact remains that North Carolina’s leadership have yet to step up and fulfill their obligations to the taxpayers of the state to provide “a sound basic education.” Not making additional cuts is not the same as making investments.

Let’s put it in perspective. Read More


The state House of Representatives tacked on a provision last night to a bill requiring public disclosure of three finalists for the ongoing search of the University of North Carolina’s next president.


The amendment, proposed by state Rep. Grier Martin, a Raleigh Democrat, was added on to a bill that would cap the terms members of the  UNC Board of Governors could serve. (Click here to read more about the term limits, and scroll down to watch video of Martin’s comments.)

It passed the House handily, 97 to 11.

Update,: The House, in another amendment, opted to strip the transparency measures out of the bill late Wednesday night. It also allowed the board to “appoint an interim President” for the UNC president.  

The bill now limiting the term limits of board members but without transparency measures went on to pass the House and Senate, and is now headed to McCrory’s desk. 

In addition to the posting of resumes and names of the candidates 10 days before any final decision, the amendment (click here to read) would also now require holding a public meeting about the final candidates.

A second vote on the proposal is scheduled for when the House convenes again at 11 a.m., and then Senate lawmakers would need to give their okay to the bill before it would head to Gov. Pat McCrory’s desk to be signed.

The UNC Board of Governors is in the midst of a search for a new system president after dismissing current president Tom Ross last January, for reasons that have not been fully explained but speculation has pointed to political motivations.

Ross, a Democrat, had led the state’s higher education system since 2011, but the UNC Board of Governors he reported to changed drastically during his tenure, after Republicans took over both chambers of the legislature soon after Ross took the job.

The 32 members of the UNC Board of Governors now consist entirely of appointees from a Republican-controlled legislature.

Up until now, the search for the next UNC president has been cloaked in secrecy, despite faculty requests to open up the process and allow final candidates to meet with members of the faculty.

Read More