House members rejected on Tuesday a multi-part bill to expand job incentives, while capping Wake County’s ability to raise local sales taxes. While House Speaker Thom Tillis and Governor Pat McCrory favored House Bill 1224, a bipartisan group of House members defeated the contentious measure.

State senators had tied the passage of HB 1224 to a separate deal, which would have helped
counties fund teaching assistant positions this fall.

Rep. Darren Jackson (Wake-D) argued the TA budget fix should be in a separate bill, not dependent on passage of the incentives bill.

Rep. Nelson Dollar (Wake-R) joined Jackson in arguing against the bill GOP leadership favored. Dollar said a $20 million Job Catalyst fund to be administered solely by the Commerce Secretary lacked accountability and was unlikely to help rural, low-wealth counties.

In the end, HB 1224 failed on a 47-54 vote.

Today, the House returns with an 11:00 a.m. session where they are expected to vote on an 11th hour  coal ash compromise, which emerged late Tuesday. That bill is expected to be the final piece of legislation House members tackle before adjournment.

To hear a portion of Tuesday’s debate, click below. For more on the fate of the teacher assistant funding fix, read Lindsay Wagner’s story on our main N.C. Policy Watch site:

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Ian MillhiserIt looks like we’ll have a sizable crowd, but some seats still remain for Thursday’s NC Policy Watch Crucial Conversation luncheon: The State of the U.S. Supreme Court with Ian Millhiser of the Center for American Progress.

Millhiser is the Senior Constitutional Policy Analyst for the Center for American Progress and the Justice Editor for the Center for American Progress Action Fund. His work focuses on the Constitution and the judiciary. Ian previously was a Policy Analyst and Blogger for ThinkProgress, held the open government portfolio for CAP’s Doing What Works project, and was a Legal Research Analyst with ThinkProgress during the nomination and confirmation of Justice Sonia Sotomayor to the United States Supreme Court.

Don’t miss the opportunity to hear from this knowledgeable and important voice at this critical time.

When: Thursday, August 21, at noon — Box lunches will be available at 11:45 a.m.

Where: *(NOTE—NEW LOCATION)* The North Carolina Association of Educators Building, 700 S. Salisbury St. in Raleigh. This location features on-site parking.

Cost: $10, admission includes a box lunch.

Click here to register

Questions?? Contact Rob Schofield at 919-861-2065 or rob@ncpolicywatch.com

- See more at: http://www.ncpolicywatch.com/2014/08/11/crucial-conversation-the-state-of-the-u-s-supreme-court-with-ian-millhiser-of-the-center-for-american-progress/#sthash.TdgPmivj.dpuf

Yesterday’s release of the latest labor market numbers for July 2014 continues to show a slow recovery of jobs in North Carolina. Job growth, while occurring, is insufficient to ensure that the state’s growing working age population has employment opportunities. North Carolina has still not replaced the nearly 300,000 jobs lost during the Great Recession. In fact, the state’s job creation over the year (2.1 percent) is not significantly different than that for the nation (1.9 percent) over the same period. The state’s jobs deficit also remains high at 470,000, and at the current annual rate of job creation will require five years to close.

In this context, here is the missing workers update for July 2014: there still remain more than 256,000 North Carolinians who are missing from the labor force.  These are folks who would be seeking employment if job opportunities were stronger. If these workers were counted in the unemployment rate, that rate would be 12 percent rather than the official unemployment rate for July 2014 of 6.5 percent.

BTC - Missing Workers July 2014

MCcRORY SIGNS FRACKING BILLIt’s been more than two months since Governor Pat MCcrory signed into law legislation that clears the way for permits to be issued for fracking in North Carolina. Still, environmental groups and concerned citizens are expected to turn out in full force this week to comment on draft rules for future gas and oil exploration.

The Mining and Energy Commission does not have a say in whether fracking will occur; they are using the upcoming hearings to gather suggestions to improve draft rules.

Fracking opponents believe the hearings may be the best chance they have to strengthen the guidelines that address things like forced pooling and chemical disclosure.

Each speaker will have just three minutes to make their case.

Want to read the draft rules in advance of the hearing? Click here.

Want to attend one of the hearings? Here’s what you need to know:

Raleigh: Wed., Aug. 20, 10AM-2PMfrack-8
NCSU’s McKimmon Center, 1101 Gorman St.

Sanford: Fri., Aug. 22, 5PM-9PM
Wicker Civic Center, 1801 Nash St.

Reidsville: Mon., Aug. 25, 5PM-9PM
Rockingham County High School, 180 High School Rd.

Cullowhee/Western NC: Fri., Sept. 12, 5PM-9PM
W. Carolina Univ. Bardo Performing Arts Ctr., 199 Centennial Drive

Former state Rep. Stephen LaRoque wants back pay from the non-profit he founded – the same federally-funded group that prosecutors contend he stole $300,000 from while serving as its executive director.

LaRoque, a Kinston Republican who resigned from the state legislature in July 2012 following his federal indictment, filed a breach of contract lawsuit in May in Lenoir County Superior Court against the East Carolina Development Company. The non-profit was one of two non-profits LaRoque ran as part of a U.S. Department of Agriculture rural lending program intended to offer low-interest loans to struggling businesses in rural areas.

LaRoque-PCLaRoque is seeking $58,500 for what he contends is six months of work he was never paid for in 2012 and nearly three months worth of pay and benefits following his termination from the non-profit after his federal indictment, according to the court documents.

“Defendants have willfully breached the Agreement by failing to pay the agreed upon salary, benefits and give 90 days notice of agreement termination [sic] despite multiple requests from Plaintiff,” LaRoque wrote in the lawsuit, which he filed on his own behalf.

Nowhere in his four-page complaint nor in East Carolina Development Company’s brief answer denying any wrongdoing is any mention of the federal charges and controversy.

The lawsuit (see below) has been stayed until after LaRoque’s February criminal trial is over, meaning it won’t move forward until that trial is over, said Mikael Gross, a Raleigh attorney now representing LaRoque in the Lenoir County lawsuit.

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