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Dean BakerIf you don’t follow economist Dean Baker on Twitter or the blogosphere, you should. This week, Baker has, among other things, dissected the bombs being lobbed at the Affordable Care Act because of the finding that it might lead to lowering of employment numbers.

As Baker notes here:

“Apparently a lot of media folks have made such a habit of repeating Republican talking points that they can’t see what is right in front of their eyes. The Republicans are touting the fact that the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) expects the Affordable Care Act (ACA) to reduce the number of people working.

Guess what? This was one of the motivations for the ACA. It is a feature, not a bug. Read More

Medicaid expansionThe drumbeat calling on state leaders to reverse course and accept federal Medicaid dollars in order to provide health insurance to hundreds of thousands of poor North Carolinians continues to grow louder and louder.

As this morning’s Greensboro News & Record editorial argues (after citing a new report by the accounting firm Jackson-Hewitt that the failure to expand will lead to tens of millions of dollars in tax penalties for North Carolina businesses):

“A society and an economy are stronger when people are healthier. Expanding Medicaid coverage could help North Carolina achieve that goal. If that could spare employers tens of millions of dollars in tax penalties at the same time, our pro-business governor should explore that opportunity.”

Meanwhile, be sure to check out this essay by Duke writer and doctor Laura Musselwhite in  Raleigh’s News & Observer in which she points out: Read More

Sen. Richard Burr has an idea: maybe it’s time to reform our health insurance system. We could set up state-based marketplaces, give tax credits to purchase private insurance, and create some new protections for people with pre-existing conditions. But first we need to repeal the Affordable Care Act because it sets up state-based marketplaces, gives tax credits to purchase private insurance, and creates some new protections for people with pre-existing conditions.

The fact that Sen. Burr’s proposal is a watered down version of Obamacare is not its most entertaining feature. Partisan opponents of the Affordable Care Act have spent several years introducing alternatives to health reform that are just less workable variations of the law the nation has spent the past three years implementing.

What is most entertaining about Sen. Burr’s new proposal is what it says about prevention. Although the Affordable Care Act is one of the largest, most comprehensive investments ever made in prevention, it was not enough for Sen. Burr. In debates and news interviews he constantly harped on the lack of investment in prevention as the primary driver of his opposition to the ACA. In fact, he introduced an ACA alternative in 2009 called the Patients’ Choice Act. Title I of that act is “Investing in Prevention”. Prevention, after all, is the key.

What, then, does this new proposal, called “The Patient Choice, Affordability, Responsibility, and Empowerment Act,” have to say about prevention? Nothing, nothing at all. In the detailed summary of the bill there is no mention of prevention. So, Sen. Burr is now proposing that we throw away a unprecedented, large-scale prevention effort currently underway and replace it with nothing.

It’s easy enough to laugh off these public relations stunts. Even Sen. Burr has admitted that repeal is unlikely. It’s even less likely now that millions of people are enrolled in ACA plans and are receiving tax credits. But it’s sad that this is what passes for legislating nowadays. There are things that need fixing in health reform. Legislators should get to work and stop trying to strip away protections for American consumers.

 

Blue CrossWe’ve often given Blue Cross Blue Shield of North Carolina a hard time down through the years here at The Pulse, but today the insurance giant deserves credit for admitting it screwed up and taking action to correct its recent error of cancelling polices of same-sex couples.

According to BCBSNC boss Brad Wilson: “We should have more thoughtfully considered this decision, with full appreciation of the impact it would have on same-sex married couples and domestic partners. We’re sorry we failed to do so.”

Good for Wilson and BCBSNC. You can read the company’s entire statement by clicking here.

Steve Benen has yet another example of what’s becoming an increasingly common story this morning about the real world impact of the Affordable Care Act. For all of its flaws and imperfections, the new law is making quality insurance available to thousands upon thousands of people who would be utterly out of luck otherwise.

The post tells the story of the Recchi family of Lancaster, Ohio — small business owners who initially didn’t “want any part of Obamacare,” but who now that they’ve gotten through the sign-up hassle, see it as “a godsend.”

Read the entire post by clicking here.