Archives

News

Robeson County officials settled a complaint with the federal justice department this week, saying it would take steps to improve access for disabled residents to public resources.

The federal agency had found the county had numerous violations of the Americans with Disabilities Act (which was passed 25 years ago) , leaving those with disabilities unable to access county services and programs as easily as other citizens.

A news release from the U.S. Justice Department about the settlement noted that Robeson County, on North Carolina’s border with South Carolina, has a poverty rate of over 30 percent, and nearly 40 percent of its population identities as Native American, and 25 percent are African-American.

According to the settlement, the county agreed to make changes to buildings and county property so that parking, building entrances, restrooms, service counters and drinking fountains can be accessed by those with physical disabilities. The sheriff’s office will also have to devise a plan so that its deputies and emergency responders can communicate with those who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, and accommodations will be made at voting sites so that those that use wheelchairs or who are blind or with vision issues can cast votes without hindrances.

The settlement comes the same week the N.C. Auditor’s Office released an audit that found the public school system in Robeson County misused $3 million in Medicaid funds meant for children with special needs.

From an Associated Press article about the audit:

The audit issued Monday says for three fiscal years starting in 2011, the school system did not use about $1 million per year in Medicaid reimbursements to provide services for special-needs students as required.

The school system said in a letter to the auditor’s office that it wasn’t told by state education officials that the money was required to be used for special-needs students. It acknowledges that reimbursement money went to other district needs.

State schools Superintendent June Atkinson said in a letter that education officials will work with Robeson County and districts statewide on how the reimbursements are used.

Click here to read the entire audit.

Robeson County officials settled a complaint with the federal justice department this week, saying it would take steps to improve access for disabled residents to public resources.

The federal agency had found the county had numerous violations of the Americans with Disabilities Act (which was passed 25 years ago) , leaving those with disabilities unable to access county services and programs as easily as other citizens.

A news release from the U.S. Justice Department about the settlement noted that Robeson County, on North Carolina’s border with South Carolina, has a poverty rate of over 30 percent, and nearly 40 percent of its population identities as Native American, and 25 percent is African-American.

According to the settlement, the county agreed to make changes to buildings and county property so that parking, building entrances, restrooms, service counters and drinking fountains can be accessed by those with physical disabilities. The sheriff’s office will also have to devise a plan so that its deputies and emergency responders can communicate with those who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, and accommodations will be made at voting sites so that those that use wheelchairs or who are blind or with vision issues can cast votes without hindrances.

The settlement comes the same week the N.C. Auditor’s Office released an audit that found the public school system in Robeson County misused $3 million in Medicaid funds meant for children with special needs.

From an Associated Press article about the audit:

The audit issued Monday says for three fiscal years starting in 2011, the school system did not use about $1 million per year in Medicaid reimbursements to provide services for special-needs students as required.

The school system said in a letter to the auditor’s office that it wasn’t told by state education officials that the money was required to be used for special-needs students. It acknowledges that reimbursement money went to other district needs.

State schools Superintendent June Atkinson said in a letter that education officials will work with Robeson County and districts statewide on how the reimbursements are used.

Click here to read the entire audit.

Uncategorized

Craig Jarvis at Under the Dome has an encouraging story on today’s meeting of a special “blue ribbon” commission. The commission is dealing with the issue (highlighted here at NC Policy Watch on multiple occasions) in which the state has been unlawfully warehousing people with mental illness in adult care homes. 

“The 32-member Blue Ribbon Commission on Transitions to Community Living met for the first time and spent the day at the Legislative Office Building in Raleigh getting up to speed on several pressing issues.

The state is working toward that goal in an agreement with the federal Department of Justice in order to avoid being sued under the Americans with Disabilities Act. A federal investigation alleged that the state wrongly confined thousands of people in adult care homes and institutions. Read More