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News item from the Charlotte Observer:

“The Fort Mill, S.C., Republican who went public Tuesday with his plea for help paying for sight-saving surgery had raised almost $12,000 by Wednesday evening – most of it from self-described liberals and Affordable Care Act supporters saying they hope he’s learned a lesson.

That’s enough to ensure he can get the treatment he needs, said Dr. Andrew Antoszyk, an eye surgeon with Charlotte Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat Associates. After reading Luis Lang’s story in the Observer on Wednesday, Antoszyk said he’d work with Lang and with Novant Health to give him the care at reduced cost.

Lang, a self-employed handyman, declined to get health insurance until he needed expensive surgery for diabetes-related eye problems. His story went viral, spurring blogs and comments, national media commentary, thousands of social media shares and vigorous discussions across the country.

His GoFundMe.com page has been shared on social media more than 1,700 times since Tuesday morning, with more than 600 people making small donations, often with political commentary.

‘No one should be without medical (care) even if they have not made their own best choices in life,’ wrote Steve Kadel, who gave $10. ‘The party of personal responsibility (has) left you hanging on your own consequences. Progressives like me think that’s just cruel. Be well.’”

Whether Lang or other Affordable Care Act naysayers will learn a lesson is unclear at this point — Lang himself, offers rather muddled comments on the subject later in the Observer article — but a few things are clear from all this:

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Commentary

In case you missed it, be sure to check out Ned Barnett’s column from Sunday’s edition of Raleigh’s News & Observer in which he explains why the myth of runaway Medicaid spending is just that — a myth.

“Refusing to expand Medicaid may look reflexively anti-Obama and hardhearted, but Republicans say it’s a matter of fiscal responsibility. They say that Medicaid’s annual costs are prone to unpredictable surges and that its overall rate of increase means it will soon crowd out the state’s ability to meet its other obligations.

But the Medicaid monster is a myth. A new analysis by the nonprofit Medicaid management organization Community Care of North Carolina found the health care program to be a steady expense. It’s expensive, yes, but it does a lot to improve the health of a vulnerable population and may well head off more expensive medical costs that would inflate premiums for everyone.

John Alexander, Community Care’s vice president for Medicaid financial performance and analysis, sat in a conference room last week and presented the reality behind the illusion. ‘We found that spending on Medicaid isn’t broken, it isn’t unpredictable, it isn’t out of control,’ he said.

Indeed, he said, year-over-year spending on Medicaid is consistent, its administrative costs are relatively low and the cost per patient is going down, falling 9 percent in the last four years.”

The essay goes on to explain how supposed spikes in Medicaid spending in recent years are really just a result of the end of federal stimulus spending in response to the Great Recession:

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Commentary

gavelmed

In January, over half of all those that participated in the Kaiser Health Tracking Poll were unaware of a Supreme Court case, King v. Burwell , that could greatly impact many states’ economic growth and public health. What has made the Affordable Care Act successful is that individuals are able to receive financial help to purchase insurance plans and depending on the outcome of this case, many people may lose this assistance in states that rely on the federal marketplace instead of a state-run marketplace. The decision of the King v. Burwell case could potentially affect 1.6 million North Carolinians’ ability to access affordable health care. Approximately 560,000 North Carolinians have purchased insurance coverage using the federal marketplace and are at risk of losing subsidies that would then make health care too expensive. What is more, the King v. Burwell decision is linked to expanding Medicaid to nearly 500,000 people throughout NC as Governor McCrory has stated that he will wait until the Supreme Court decision before making a formal decision on Medicaid expansion. We also know that a dramatic shift in enrollment will have a major impact on private insurance companies that will likely drive rates up by 43 percent for everyone. Some insurers may pull out of the market altogether.

Leaders in many red and blue states are concerned about the potential impact of losing insurance subsidies, and they are creating response plans. Let’s hope this process is playing out behind-the-scenes in North Carolina as well. The same Kaiser poll reports that 82 percent of Democrats, 63 percent of Independents, and 40 percent of Republicans believe that the U.S. Congress should act to make sure that low-and-moderate income families continue receiving tax credits to purchase affordable insurance even if the Supreme Court strikes down subsidies. However, states do not have to rely on the federal government to pass a law to ensure access to affordable health care; some states are already preparing to develop state-run exchanges. Nationally, 51 percent of Republicans, 63 percent of Independents, and 61 percent of Democrats believe that states that rely on the federal marketplace should create their own state-run market places. North Carolina’s Governor and General Assembly should take the initiative and start constructing our own state exchange. If the Supreme Court decides not to uphold the subsidies for low-to-moderate-income individuals who rely on the federal marketplace, it’s not clear that NC has a plan. Across the U.S., 63 percent of people believe that Republicans do not have an alternative to the ACA. Our state can’t wait on Congress to come up with a solution. Waiting to act until a Supreme Court decision in mid-to-late June is risky and could leave many North Carolinians without health care and our insurance market in ruins.

Commentary

The beneficial impacts of Obamacare continue add up, but unfortunately, North Carolina isn’t getting its fair share. That’s that’s one of the takeaways from a new report distributed yesterday on the fifth anniversary of the law. As health policy expert Tara Culp Ressler of Think Progress reports:

“According to a new report from the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), hospitals saved at least $7.4 billion last year, thanks in large part to reforms under Obamacare. The savings reflect a reduction in the so-called “uncompensated care” that hospitals provide to uninsured Americans, and are even greater than HHS officials predicted they would be at the beginning of this year.

Since people without insurance typically don’t have any means to cover their medical bills, the cost of their treatment ends up falling on the hospital itself. Therefore, as more people gain coverage, it become less expensive for hospitals to care for their patients. More than 16 million previously uninsured Americans have gotten covered under Obamacare, contributing to the biggest drop in the national uninsurance rate over the past four decades.”

If states like North Carolina had gotten on board with closing the Medicaid gap, things would be even better:

“The savings have been most pronounced in the states that agreed to accept Obamacare’s optional Medicaid expansion, which seeks to extend public insurance to additional low-income people. Nearly 70 percent of the savings documented in the HHS report — a total of $5 billion — occurred in the 29 states that have expanded Medicaid. And, if every state had agreed to add more people to their Medicaid rolls, their hospitals could have saved an extra $1.4 billion.”

In other words, here’s more confirmation that,  in addition to helping hundreds of thousands of working people in need, Medicaid expansion would do wonders for some of the most important businesses in North Carolina (especially in rural North Carolina) hospitals. It’s hard to imagine that state leaders can resist taking this obvious and long overdue step much longer.

Commentary

Tara Culp-Ressler at Think Progress has one very impressive list:

More than 16 million people have gained insurance.

According to the most recent data from the Obama administration, about 16.4 previously uninsured Americans have gotten coverage under the law, either by purchasing private plans on the new state-level marketplaces or by gaining public insurance through the Medicaid expansion. That translates to a 35 percent reduction in the national uninsured rate, which is the largest drop in the number of Americans going without health care over the past four decades.

You don’t have to take the Obama administration’s word for it. In addition to the federal government’s data, multiple outside surveys have confirmed dramatic drops in the uninsured rate thanks to Obamacare.

Health reform is costing less than expected.

Earlier this month, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) announced that implementing Obamacare over the next ten years will cost $142 billion less than the nonpartisan agency had previously predicted. That represents an 11 percent reduction from an earlier CBO projection released at the beginning of this year — and stands in sharp contrast to Obamacare opponents’ dire predictions about how the law was going to cripple the economy.

CBO officials have repeatedly slashed their cost projections for the law, largely because of a historic slowdown in national health care spending over the past several years that’s resulted in slower premium growth. There are multiple factors contributing to the dramatic slowdown in annual medical costs, and it’s unclear exactly how big of a role the Affordable Care Act has played. But the cost saving provisions included in Obamacare certainly haven’t hurt.

Employers aren’t cutting their workers’ benefits. Read More