Health careThe U.S. Supreme Court has agreed for a fourth time to wade through an Obamacare dispute, this time in several consolidated cases involving the contraceptive mandate.

This from the Associated Press:

The newest “Obamacare” case involves objections by faith-based hospitals, colleges and charities to the process the administration devised to spare them from paying for contraceptives for women covered under their health plans, and yet ensure that those women can obtain birth control at no extra cost.

The groups complain that they remain complicit in making available the contraceptives in violation of their religious beliefs.

Seven out of eight federal appeals courts have agreed with the administration that requiring the faith-based groups to make their objection known and identify their insurer or insurance administrator does not violate a federal religious freedom law.

Argument in the cases is expected in March 2016.


Action NC policy and public affairs director Kevin Rogers has an opinion piece in the News & Observer arguing that the ACA is here to stay, so we should get down to the business of improving the law and fully implementing it in North Carolina.

Open enrollment, he reminds us, starts November 1. Our state is a national leader when it comes to signing up residents for Affordable Care Act plans. The many people who have these policies need added protections, not repeal votes, to make their insurance plans work better. And the working poor need our state leaders to stop blocking Medicaid expansion. This interposition is causing great pain, and unnecessary deaths, all across North Carolina.

You can read the entire editorial here. Rogers concludes with this message to lawmakers:

As we enter the third ACA enrollment period, it is high time for Congress and the General Assembly to accept reality, abandon partisan tricks and move forward to improve the economic and human well-being of our state. Until then, thousands of lives will be lost each year, and billions of dollars wasted that health care consumers, taxpayers and our government cannot afford. The ACA is here to stay – it’s time to start acting accordingly.

If they heed his advice that would be sweet indeed.


The following is a press release from our friends at ActionNC about powerful polling that shows most voters in battleground states want to move on from the obsession with repealing health reform to a mature discussion of how to improve the law. After more than five years the Affordable Care Act is getting some age on it, and we have learned important lessons from implementation. But we can’t make the law better if lawmakers don’t first accept that it’s a law that is here to stay. As usual, the public has to lead our leaders.


October 7, 2015

Contact: Kevin Rogers, 919.862.4009

Survey Shows that Voters Believe “ACA is Here to Stay”
Elected Officials Need to Improve Law; Not Repeal It

(Raleigh, NC) — A new survey shows that the majority of likely voters in five key battleground states – Florida, Nevada, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Virginia – believe the Affordable Care Act is here to stay (64%) and that Congress should work to improve the law (71%).

The survey, which was released by Community Catalyst and Service Employees International Union (SEIU), found that likely voters prefer a candidate who will work to improve the law over one who would repeal it (55% vs. 40%). Most agreed elected officials should “stop wasting time” trying to repeal the law (58%) and instead focus on a variety of improvements to lower the cost of care.

“These research findings confirm what we continue to hear over and over across North Carolina. People are frustrated with repeated efforts to repeal the ACA. It’s time to recognize that the law is here to stay.” said Kevin Rogers, Policy Director for Action NC. “We need to move forward to find ways to continue to lower health care costs for people and address issues such as high copayments and escalating drug prices.”

“Voters understand that the law has led to some important outcomes such as guaranteeing coverage for people with pre-existing health conditions. This research shows that they now want their elected officials to work together to make improvements that favor patients over insurance companies and pharmaceutical companies,” said Rogers.

The survey showed strong support across party lines for improvements that are being considered to lower health care costs, including:

  • Require hospitals and other health care providers to be transparent about their prices so people understand what the cost of services will be before they use them (75% strongly support)
  • Change the way insurance companies pay doctors and hospitals to create incentives to keep people healthy rather than paying providers based on the number of tests and procedures they give (64% strongly support)
  • Give Medicare the power to negotiate drug prices (63% strongly support)
  • Expand tax credits to small businesses to help the afford employee health insurance (61% strongly support)
  • Give state insurance commissioners more authority to push back on insurance companies that want to hike up insurance premiums (57% strongly support)

The survey was conducted by PerryUndem Research/Communication September 15-19, 2015; 1,005 adults who said they were likely to vote in the 2016 elections and have a history of voting in the 2012 or 2008 elections responded. The margin of error is +/- 3.1 percentage points.

You can read more about the poll results here.


North Carolina’s uninsured rate fell in 2014 thanks to the implementation of federal health reform but data released today show our state is leaving many citizens behind by refusing to expand Medicaid.

The Census Bureau today released the country’s official data on health insurance rates, which shows that 1.27 million North Carolinians lacked health insurance in 2014 compared to 1.5 million uninsured North Carolinians in 2013. Expanding Medicaid would have resulted in a more dramatic drop in the uninsured rate.

We see that many of the states that expanded Medicaid such as West Virginia and Kentucky now have single-digit uninsured rates whereas North Carolina’s uninsured rate was 13 percent in 2014 compared to 15.6 percent in 2013. The Affordable Care Act is working, but it would work better if policymakers stopped blocking coverage for the working poor families who don’t earn enough to buy private insurance and don’t currently qualify for Medicaid.

A study by George Washington University released last year shows that expanding Medicaid in North Carolina would extend coverage to 500,000 more people while creating 43,000 jobs and attracting $21 billion in federal funding over five years.

Nationally, the Census data show that the uninsured rate dropped to 10.4 percent last year, down from 13.3 percent in 2013. These numbers reflect individuals who were uninsured throughout the year. The Affordable Care Act helped more than 8.8 million people gain health insurance coverage.

It’s not too late for North Carolina to catch up with the rest of the nation. The Governor could propose, and the legislature could adopt, a state-specific plan to close the coverage gap at any time.

Commentary, Uncategorized

The North Carolina Justice Center launched radio and digital ads this week urging people to ask Gov. Pat McCrory to release a plan that expands affordable health insurance in our state.

We have the opportunity to tap federal funds to extend affordable insurance coverage to more than 500,000 people struggling to pay for care. Our tax dollars are sitting in Washington waiting to be used to boost rural health care in our state and save more than 1,000 lives every year.

We can expand Medicaid with this money or we can develop a state-specific plan to experiment with new coverage ideas. Conservative Governors in Arkansas, Iowa, Indiana, Montana, Utah, Tennessee and elsewhere have proposed specific policies. Gov. McCrory told news outlets at the beginning of the year that he was considering doing the same. The hold up, he claimed at the time, was the latest Affordable Care Act challenge at the U.S. Supreme Court. He would announce his support, or opposition, to expanding coverage after the high court ruled in King v. Burwell.

King v. Burwell came and went and still no word from the Governor.

The Governor and legislators all have access to taxpayer funded healthcare so they can afford to delay a decision. Many others in our state aren’t so lucky.

These 500,000 North Carolinians are mostly the working poor with jobs in construction and food service that do not provide health insurance benefits. They don’t currently qualify for Medicaid because eligibility is restrictive in our state. They can’t afford to buy private insurance. Now they are stuck and just need action from their elected representatives.

It starts with the Governor. He can change the dynamic by showing leadership and proposing a plan. Go to NC Left Me Out and share your story if you or a loved one are in the coverage gap. And then use the phone number listed to contact Gov. McCrory and ask him, “Where’s the plan to expand coverage?” We can’t wait any longer.