Commentary

North Carolina’s uninsured rate falls, but gains are muted by failure to expand Medicaid

North Carolina’s uninsured rate fell in 2014 thanks to the implementation of federal health reform but data released today show our state is leaving many citizens behind by refusing to expand Medicaid.

The Census Bureau today released the country’s official data on health insurance rates, which shows that 1.27 million North Carolinians lacked health insurance in 2014 compared to 1.5 million uninsured North Carolinians in 2013. Expanding Medicaid would have resulted in a more dramatic drop in the uninsured rate.

We see that many of the states that expanded Medicaid such as West Virginia and Kentucky now have single-digit uninsured rates whereas North Carolina’s uninsured rate was 13 percent in 2014 compared to 15.6 percent in 2013. The Affordable Care Act is working, but it would work better if policymakers stopped blocking coverage for the working poor families who don’t earn enough to buy private insurance and don’t currently qualify for Medicaid.

A study by George Washington University released last year shows that expanding Medicaid in North Carolina would extend coverage to 500,000 more people while creating 43,000 jobs and attracting $21 billion in federal funding over five years.

Nationally, the Census data show that the uninsured rate dropped to 10.4 percent last year, down from 13.3 percent in 2013. These numbers reflect individuals who were uninsured throughout the year. The Affordable Care Act helped more than 8.8 million people gain health insurance coverage.

It’s not too late for North Carolina to catch up with the rest of the nation. The Governor could propose, and the legislature could adopt, a state-specific plan to close the coverage gap at any time.

Commentary, Uncategorized

New ads ask Gov. McCrory, “Where’s the plan to expand coverage?” (AUDIO)

The North Carolina Justice Center launched radio and digital ads this week urging people to ask Gov. Pat McCrory to release a plan that expands affordable health insurance in our state.

We have the opportunity to tap federal funds to extend affordable insurance coverage to more than 500,000 people struggling to pay for care. Our tax dollars are sitting in Washington waiting to be used to boost rural health care in our state and save more than 1,000 lives every year.

We can expand Medicaid with this money or we can develop a state-specific plan to experiment with new coverage ideas. Conservative Governors in Arkansas, Iowa, Indiana, Montana, Utah, Tennessee and elsewhere have proposed specific policies. Gov. McCrory told news outlets at the beginning of the year that he was considering doing the same. The hold up, he claimed at the time, was the latest Affordable Care Act challenge at the U.S. Supreme Court. He would announce his support, or opposition, to expanding coverage after the high court ruled in King v. Burwell.

King v. Burwell came and went and still no word from the Governor.

The Governor and legislators all have access to taxpayer funded healthcare so they can afford to delay a decision. Many others in our state aren’t so lucky.

These 500,000 North Carolinians are mostly the working poor with jobs in construction and food service that do not provide health insurance benefits. They don’t currently qualify for Medicaid because eligibility is restrictive in our state. They can’t afford to buy private insurance. Now they are stuck and just need action from their elected representatives.

It starts with the Governor. He can change the dynamic by showing leadership and proposing a plan. Go to NC Left Me Out and share your story if you or a loved one are in the coverage gap. And then use the phone number listed to contact Gov. McCrory and ask him, “Where’s the plan to expand coverage?” We can’t wait any longer.

Commentary

Editorials: No more excuses for McCrory in wake of Obamacare decision

As Adam Linker noted yesterday in the post below, there are no more excuses now for Gov. McCrory:

“Now that the Supreme Court has ruled — again — that the structure of the Affordable Care Act is constitutional, it is time to move forward with making the law work better in our state.

The first, and most important, step is accepting federal funds to extend the benefits of affordable health insurance coverage to 500,000 more people in our state. Gov. McCrory said last year that his staff was assembling options to expand coverage and that he would make an announcement about his recommendation after the Supreme Court ruled in King v. Burwell. The ruling has arrived.”

This morning, major newspapers around the state are echoing this sentiment.

From the Durham Herald-Sun:

“With the question of the act’s validity answered by the court, it’s time for North Carolina
to reverse its unfortunate decision to not extend Medicaid coverage to an estimated
500,000 individuals and families too poor to qualify for the ACA subsidies.”

From the Greensboro News & Record:

“This was an enormous victory for President Obama. Most importantly, it avoids the human toll that would have resulted from an adverse ruling.

Next, North Carolina should expand Medicaid coverage for thousands of residents who still fall between the coverage cracks. State leaders should have expanded Medicaid in the first place, but seemed more intent on thumbing their noses at the president than doing what’s right. Not only is most of its cost paid for by the federal government, but also it would create as many as many as 43,000 jobs. Gov. Pat McCrory had said he wanted to wait for the Affordable Care decision first before considering that step. Now that the high court has ruled, it’s time for him to act.”

From Raleigh’s News & Observer:

“Meanwhile, Gov. Pat McCrory has shown a lack of political courage in declining to support an expansion of Medicaid, the state and federal insurance program for the poor and disabled. The federal government, under the Affordable Care Act, would pay 100 percent of the expense in the first three years and at least 90 percent thereafter. McCrory said he was awaiting the high court decision to make his own decision about pushing for Medicaid expansion. But he wasn’t. Once again, the 500,000 North Carolinians who could be helped are left to hope that a move to expand Medicaid comes before an illness or an accident does.”

In other words, come on Governor, get off your keister do the right thing!
Commentary

It’s time for a plan to cover 500,000 North Carolinians

Now that the Supreme Court has ruled — again — that the structure of the Affordable Care Act is constitutional, it is time to move forward with making the law work better in our state.

The first, and most important, step is accepting federal funds to extend the benefits of affordable health insurance coverage to 500,000 more people in our state. Gov. McCrory said last year that his staff was assembling options to expand coverage and that he would make an announcement about his recommendation after the Supreme Court ruled in King v. Burwell. The ruling has arrived.

When asked about expansion today McCrory was sort of squishy and said he wants a North Carolina plan. We all do. But first we need the Governor to draft and release such a plan. Conservative Governors in Ohio, Indiana, Utah, Michigan, Tennessee and other states have either closed the coverage gap or assembled a strategy to accomplish a coverage expansion. There’s no reason our Governor can’t do the same.

Legislators are still critical of expansion. Sen. Ralph Hise says that he doesn’t think the federal government will be flexible enough to allow a state option. His wish list includes wanting to expand using private insurance and imposing co-pays on recipients above the federal poverty level.

Of course, the federal government has approved even more conservative measures than Hise mentions. Several states including Arkansas, Iowa, and Michigan do use private insurance to expand coverage. Some states are charging co-pays and premiums even on enrollees earning less than the federal poverty level. The federal government has shown a degree of flexibility that makes many advocates uncomfortable. The idea that our hands are tied is, to quote Justice Scalia, pure applesauce.

Recently released data from the National Health Interview Survey show the dramatic impact of expanding coverage. In Kentucky the adult uninsured rate dropped from 24.1 percent in 2013 to 15.6 percent in 2014. In Arkansas the rate went from 27.5 percent to 15.6 percent. And, most stunningly, in West Virginia the adult uninsured rate went from 28.8 percent in 2013 to 12.2 percent in 2014. These numbers reflect only the first year of expansion and states nearly cut their adult uninsured rates in half. In North Carolina the adult uninsured rate moved from 25.6 percent to 22.5 percent.

A majority of states are expanding coverage while reforming their Medicaid programs. More states will join their ranks now the Supreme Court has ruled that the Affordable Care Act is here to stay. The Governor must show leadership on this issue and ensure that all of our citizens have access to comprehensive, affordable health insurance.

News

Breaking: U.S. Supreme Court upholds subsidies for eligible purchasers on all health care exchanges

In a 6-3 decision released today, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld the availability of subsidies to health insurance purchasers on both state exchanges and the federal exchange, affirming the Fourth Circuit’s decision in King v. Burwell.

“Congress passed the Affordable Care Act to improve health insurance markets, not to destroy them,” Chief Justice John Roberts  wrote for the majority. “If at all possible, we must interpret the act in a way that is consistent with the former, and avoids the latter.”

Joining the Chief Justice were Justices Anthony Kennedy, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Stephen Breyer, Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan. Justice Antonin Scalia wrote a dissenting opinion, joined by Justices Samuel Alito and Clarence Thomas.

Plaintiffs who brought the case contended that the language of the statute only authorized subsidies for purchasers on state-run exchanges, relying on language in the Act which appeared to limit subsidies to people buying insurance on “an exchange established by the state.”

North Carolina, like three dozen other states, did not set up its own health care exchange.  More than 560,000 state residents purchased health insurance on the federal exchange instead, with more than 90 percent doing so with the help of subsidies designed to make coverage affordable for middle- and low-income purchasers.

The majority had plenty to say about the sloppiness of the drafting of the Act, but in the end found that the language at issue was ambiguous and could be interpreted in several ways. As such, the words should “be read in their context and with a view to their place in the overall statutory scheme.”

Scalia’s dissent was far less staid, calling the majority’s logic “jiggery-pokery” and “pure applesauce” and labeling the Act “SCOTUScare.”

“Under all the usual rules of interpretation, in short, the Government should lose this case,” Scalia wrote. “But normal rules of interpretation seem always to yield to the overriding principle of the present Court: The Affordable Care Act must be saved.”

Read the full court opinion here.