Archives

Supreme courtWhen you hear the name Hobby Lobby, fabrics and knitting needles may come to mind, but soon the for-profit, 13,000 employee, big box craft company will likely be known for something of greater import.

That’s because on Tuesday the company will present its challenge to the Affordable Care Act’s contraception mandate to the U.S. Supreme Court, arguing that as a corporation it has a religious identity and that, by forcing the company to pay for certain forms of contraception under the ACA, the government is unconstitutionally burdening its beliefs.

It’s a dangerous case with bad facts, bad science and bad law —  all of which, according to many legal experts, may lead to several scenarios with bad outcomes. As Stephanie Mencimer of Mother Jones writes:

Thanks to novel legal arguments and bad science, a ruling in favor of the company threatens any number of significant and revolutionary outcomes, from upending a century’s worth of settled corporate law to opening the floodgates to religious challenges to every possible federal statute to gutting the contraceptive mandate of the Affordable Care Act.

For everything and more you need to know about the case and possible outcomes, read on here.

 

 

 

fact sheet scr shotToday the NC Justice Center released a new fact sheet titled “North Carolina’s Medicaid Choice: Options and Implications.”  The fact sheet gives a brief overview of the current national picture on state Medicaid expansion decisions to use federal money available under the Affordable Care Act.  It also gives more detail about who is in this coverage gap in NC and how other states – even states with very conservative leadership – are moving forward to improve coverage and care.

 

Today’s News and Observer story by John Murawski says it all about the NC General Assembly’s anti-Affordable Care Act hearing yesterday and the bias of Chris Conover, the hearing’s star “ACA expert” whose recent writings include accusing  President Obama of being a “fascist”:

conover story front

 

Burr2Richard Burr’s ill-fated exchange with a sharp Canadian physician over the realities of health care in North America continues to rack up some great headlines for North Carolina’s senior senator.

The headline for the Los Angeles Times story is: “Watch an expert teach a smug U.S. senator about Canadian healthcare.”

At the national blog Talking Points Memo, it’s: “Canadian Health Care Expert Schools A Republican U.S. Senator.”

At Salon, it’s “Canadian doctor makes anti-Obamacare senator look like a buffoon.”

At Huffington Post, it’s: “Watch This Doctor Totally School An Anti-Obamacare Senator On Health Care.”

At the Canadian National Post, it’s: “Toronto doctor smacks down U.S. Senate question on Canadian waitlist deaths.”

In case you missed it the other day, here was the most-reported part of their exchange:

Burr: “On average, how many Canadian patients on a waiting list die each year? Do you know?”

Dr. Danielle Martin, vice president of Medical Affairs at Toronto’s Women’s College Hospital: “I don’t, sir, but I know that there are 45,000 in America who die waiting because they don’t have insurance at all.”

As reported by the folks at Talking Points Memo:

“A substantial majority of Americans believe Obamacare should remain law, either exactly as it is or with small changes, according to a new poll.

Bloomberg News found that a combined 64 percent of Americans said they support keeping the law in place. That includes 51 percent who said it should be kept but may need some small changes and 13 percent who said it should be left alone. Only 34 percent said it should be repealed.”