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Worried you haven’t saved nearly enough money for retirement? You’re not alone. A new study by the Pew Research Center finds fewer Americans feel confident they have enough to last through retirement.

While Baby Boomers worried the most about their retirement nest eggs in 2009, this new study finds those in their late 30s most concerned about their retirement outlook.

So why are 30-somethings more worried? Here’s what researchers found:

In terms of wealth, adults ages 35 to 44 were hit disproportionately hard by the Great Recession. At the same time, this age group has disproportionately failed to benefit from the Great Rebound in stock prices that began after the recession ended three years ago. The reason is that a larger share of 35- to 44-year-olds got out of the stock market between 2001 and 2010 and were on the sidelines as stock prices began to increase in 2009, according to the Pew Research analysis of data from the Survey of Consumer Finances.

The S&P 500 Index peaked at 1,576 in October 2007 but then fell to a modern low of 667 in March 2009. Since then, the stock market began a steady rise, closing at 1,258 on the last day of December 2010. It now stands at about 1,450, nearly back to its earlier peak.

The magnitude of these fluctuations nearly matches the collapse of the market just a few years earlier when the S&P 500 hit its previous high of 1,553 in March 2000, only to lose half its value to finish at 769 in October 2002.

During this decade of wild market swings, ownership of stocks and retirement accounts, such as 401(k) and thrift accounts, fell among most age groups. But the declines were greatest among those ages 35 to 44. Read More

Falling Behind in NC

North Carolina provides a support system for seniors through the Aging and Adult Services Division in the Department of Health and Human Services. Approximately 1 in 10 seniors in North Carolina live in poverty and rely on these supports. Yet, under the House FY2012-13 budget proposal, funding for Aging and Adult Services would decline by approximately 3 percent going back to FY2007-08. This drop in funding would be accompanied by a 24 percent increase in population growth for the adult population 65. Other estimates show the senior population will double over the next 20 years and is the fastest growing population in the state. The state cannot afford to fall behind and underfund services for this growing and valuable community.

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