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Jordan lakeIt’s gotten to the point where scarcely a day goes by at the North Carolina General Assembly in which the honorables don’t work to repeal some basic environmental protection law or rule. Yesterday the good people at the Sierra Club were forced to issue two statements decrying actions by lawmakers to reverse modest, common sense rules to help protect our air and water:

#1 - NC Sierra Club Statement on House Passage of H 201, Building Code Rollbacks Read More

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Thanks to Steve Harrison at Blue NC this morning for highlighting and critiquing a pair of dueling essays in yesterday’s Charlotte Observer on the sobering subject of coal ash (the waste that results from burning coal and, in part, from “scrubbing” the exhaust so that we keep the air a smidge cleaner).  

The bottom line takeaway: The innumerable problems with coal ash are just another reminder of why we are kidding ourselves if we pretend that coal is a viable long-term solution to the world’s energy challenge.

(Photo courtesy of the Southern Environmental Law Center).  
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Cross-posted from Blue NC:

Submitted by James on Fri, 04/27/2012 – 1:43pm

When it comes to using the power of the law to protect North Carolina’s water, air and land, no organization does it better than the Southern Environmental Law Center. That’s why I was so excited to get their announcement via email today, challenging the permit recently granted to Titan Cement. Titan, a foreign-owned business with a sordid history of putting profits over people, has tangled with the wrong people.

“By allowing the cement company to emit unnecessary and harmful levels of pollution, the state’s permit for Titan’s pollution fails residents and visitors of North Carolina and violates state and federal law,” said Geoff Gisler, an attorney for the Southern Environmental Law Center who represents the groups. “Ignoring available pollution controls, the state granted Titan’s toxic recipe to pollute the air we all breathe.”

Read the entire post (and the SELC press release) by clicking here.

Sue Sturgis at the Institute for Southern Studies has still more news about the worrisome impacts of fracking:

“North Carolina regulators will hold the second of two planned public hearings in Chapel Hill today to gather comments on a recently released draft report that calls for lifting the state’s ban on the controversial gas drilling technique known as hydraulic fracturing or “fracking.”

The first hearing, held last week in Sanford, N.C., brought out many opponents of fracking who focused on the documented threat such drilling presents to local water quality. Fracking opponents who attend tonight’s hearing plan to wear blue to show support for clean water.

But a growing body of science also raises concerns about fracking’s public-health impacts from air pollution.

A recent study by scientists with the Colorado School of Public Health found that air pollution from gas-drilling operations may cause acute and chronic health problems for nearby residents…”

Read the entire post by clicking here.