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Shortly after Judge Osteen gave plaintiffs until Monday to respond to intervention of legislative leaders in one same-sex marriage case in Greensboro, a federal judge in the Western District struck down a same-sex marriage ban in a case brought by the United Church of Christ and has denied legislative leaders’ request for intervention. QNotes reports:

A federal judge in North Carolina’s Western District has issued an order permanently prohibiting defendants in a United Church of Christ lawsuit against North Carolina’s anti-LGBT amendment from enforcing the ban. Additionally, the judge denied Republican state leaders’ motion to intervene in the case.

U.S. District Court Judge Max O. Cogburn, Jr., issued his two orders shortly after 5 p.m.

“Defendants are PERMANENTLY ENJOINED from enforcing such laws to the extent these laws prohibit a person from marrying another person of the same gender, prohibit recognition of same-sex marriages lawfully solemnized in other States, Territories, or a District of the United States, or seek to punish in any way clergy or other officiants who solemnize the union of same-sex couples,” Cogburn wrote.

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From WRAL

Equality NC has information for LGBTQ couples looking to get married here: http://equalitync.org/marriage/dayone/

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Thursday night after Tillis and Berger filed a motion seeking 8 days to compile legal arguments against marriage equality, Chief U.S. District Court Judge William Osteen Jr. denied the legislators’ request for delay, giving them instead a deadline of noon Friday to lay out their case. WRAL reports:

Chief U.S. District Court Judge William Osteen Jr. set a noon Friday deadline for them to lay out their legal arguments in the case, rejecting their request to delay any decision in the matter until at least Oct. 17.
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As reported, and just in time for tonight’s U.S. Senate debate between state speaker Thom Tillis and U.S. Senator Kay Hagan, the speaker and his counterpart in the state senate President Phil Berger have moved to intervene in two of the lawsuits challenging North Carolina’s ban on same-sex marriage.

The brief filed in support of their motion is here.

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With Attorney General Roy Cooper refusing to defend Amendment One in the courts, Tillis and Berger have formally filed to intervene, retaining John Eastman of the National Organization for Marriage as primary counsel and meeting a 5 p.m. deadline for action set by a federal judge.

Qnotes reports:

Republican leaders in North Carolina submitted their motion to intervene in two same-sex marriage cases shortly after 4 p.m., meeting a Greensboro, N.C., federal judge’s 5 p.m. deadline.

U.S. District Court Judge WIlliam Osteen released his order shortly after 3 p.m., dismissing all defendants with the exception of Attorney General Roy Cooper, who has already said he will no longer defend the anti-LGBT constitutional amendment passed by voters in May 2012.

[...]

In a motion filed late Thursday evening, Tillis’ and Berger’s attorneys asked Osteen to give them eight additional days — up to Oct. 17 — to submit arguments against legalizing same-sex marriage.

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The judge in two of the same-sex marriage cases pending in North Carolina  issued an order this afternoon requiring the parties to file reports within 10 days, detailing how the court should proceed in light of the U.S. Supreme Court’s refusal to review a Fourth Circuit decision rejecting Virginia’s same-sex marriage ban as unconstitutional.

Saying that it appeared that the couples challenging the state’s marriage ban were entitled to a preliminary injunction blocking the enforcement of that ban, U.S. District Judge William  L. Osteen Jr. asked the parties in Fisher-Borne v. Smith and Gerber v. Cooper to provide him with additional information needed to bring the cases to a close:

In light of the foregoing, this court orders that the parties file a status report, without argument, detailing the following matters: (1) whether the parties agree with this court’s suggestion as to the effect of [the Fourth Circuit decision] on this case as set out herein; (2) whether any discovery is required as to either of these cases prior to proceeding to summary judgment; (3) what issues remain for resolution by this court in each of these cases with respect to the challenged adoption laws; and (4) what the parties suggest in terms of additional briefing on any remaining issues.

Two other same-sex marriage cases are pending in federal court here:

General Synod of the United Church of Christ v. Cooper, filed in federal court in Charlotte on behalf of same-sex couples and four national religious denominations – the United Church of Christ, the Alliance of Baptists, the Association of Welcoming and Affirming Baptists and the Central Conference of American Rabbis – in addition to Episcopalian, Jewish and Baptist clergy from across North Carolina. The same-sex couples are seeking the freedom to marry and the clergy are seeking the religious freedom to perform wedding ceremonies for such couples.

McCrory v. Cooper, filed in March in federal court in Asheville by two women who’ve been together for more than 25 years and were legally married in New York in 2013.

No court action has occurred in those cases yet following today’s Supreme Court rulings.

Tomorrow morning, representatives from the American Civil Liberties Union of North Carolina, Equality North Carolina, and plaintiffs challenging North Carolina’s marriage ban will speak at a press conference in Raleigh about what the U.S. Supreme Court decision means for same-sex couples seeking the freedom to marry in North Carolina.

The press conference will be held at 10 a.m. at the LGBT Center of Raleigh, 324 S Harrington St, Raleigh, NC 27603