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Governor Perdue may have ruffled some feathers in the Magnolia State with her comments last Friday about Amendment One and Mississippi, but her remarks were on the money. As I noted in this interview with ABC 11. the sentiment she expressed makes perfect sense.

Think about it; If one of your main jobs was selling North Carolina to businesspeople from all over the nation and the world, you too would feel embarrassed by having to explain such nonsense. Imagine yourself in a meeting with Tim Cook, the head of Apple Computers and a gay man or, perhaps some prominent film industry exec: How the heck to you put a smiling face on such a hateful and backward-looking change?

Of course,  one could simply defer to the wisdom of the amendment’s chief sponsor, House Majority Leader Paul Stam. He said that passage of the amendment “is only backwards if you think that forward is a good thing”

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It’s not terribly surprising that there have been a lot of excellent political cartoons drawn about Amendment One. Few things lend themselves better to a good skewering than pompous, mean-spirited bigotry. Kevin Siers at the Charlotte Observer has had a lot of good ones of late.  

Still, here at NC Policy Watch, we’re partial to the fantatsic work of our own John Cole. And, happily, a lot of smart folks agree. John is actually the President of the Association of American Editorial Cartoonists

Yesterday, the gifted cartoonist for MSNBC, Daryl Cagle, featured John’s Amendment One work for Policy Watch (and a brief interview with him) on his blog, The Cagle Post. You can check out the article by clicking here.

Way to go, John!

Leaders of the group People of Faith Against Amendment One held a post-election press conference in Raleigh this morning at Pullen Memorial Baptist Church. Flanked by dozens of individual members of the coalition, Rev. Nancy Petty of Pullen told the assembled media and observers that her group is “disappointed but not defeated.”

She said that while “the voting majority has chosen discrimination and fear and inequality,” her group would only redouble its efforts. She cited with evident emotion a late night message she had received after the election results were in from Rev. William Barber of the state NAACP in which he told her that “We have learned from each other and the movement will be even stronger and prevail in the days to come.”

Petty was followed to the podium by Jimmy Creech, a former Methodist minister who has long fought for LGBT equality. Read More

On one level, last night’s election results on Amendment One were obviously very disappointing. But as today’s Weekly Briefing argues, conservatives will likely come to regret their decision to create a real and vibrant pro-equality movement in this state.

The proponents of the Amendment may have won the battle last night, but it will ultimately prove to be a Pyrrhic victory. Amendment opponents would, obviously, never have chosen this path, but now that it’s been thrust upon them, there’s no denying the following: 1) the day on which North Carolinians will no longer tolerate marriage discrimination is coming sooner rather than later, and 2) the last eight months have only served to expedite the process.

Seth Keel is an impressive young man in Raleigh who’s become quite a successful advocate for progressive change at a tender age. You can vist his Facebook page here and read his tweets here.  

Yesterday, I received a copy of an opinion piece he recently authored on Amendment One.  I hope you will read it:

Why I oppose Amendment One
by Seth Byron Keel

This year is the first year of my life that I have not lived in any denial of my sexual orientation, nor have I attempted to hide it as a part of who I am. I was sitting in the General Assembly when this Amendment was debated and eventually passed to be put on the ballot before us on May 8. I remember feeling disrespected and degraded. My representatives stood on the floor of the House and argued that I am less than them because of my sexual orientation; they argued that I do not deserve the same rights that our government has granted them. Believe me, this was not a choice that I made – I would remember waking up one day Read More