Archives

Commentary

If you’re an unemployed or underemployed North Carolinian trying to get by in a community that’s never recovered from the Great Recession, take heart: things are actually just ducky according to conservative think tanks — no matter what your eyes and bank account tell you.

For “confirmation” check out this morning’s Locke Foundation missive from the group’s former director: “Job Growth Sizzled Last Year.” The column is just the latest in an ceaseless series of articles designed to spin the situation in North Carolina and convince people that two obvious things are not true: a) The state economy continues to struggle to generate good jobs to replace the ones lost in the Great Recession and b) the North Carolina recovery that has occurred is mostly just a reflection of national trends.

Happily, some analysts and experts aren’t just trying to cover up for the destructive and counter-productive policies of the McCrory administration and the General Assembly (which, together, have about as much to do with the limited good news that has taken place in the state as they do with the price of tea in China).

Patrick McHugh of the Budget and Tax Center, for instance, explained what’s really going on in the North Carolina economy Monday in this new report: “Growth Without Prosperity.” This is from the release that accompanied the report:

“The worst of the Great Recession is behind us, but the damage lingers, weighing down communities and families across North Carolina. We are now seven years removed from the financial crisis of 2008, but in North Carolina wages are down, job creation is lagging, and many communities are still stuck in recession. Read More

Commentary

Budget and Tax Center economist Patrick McHugh is out with a powerful new report entitled “Growth Without Prosperity: Seven years After the Great Recession Started, Recovery Still Eludes North Carolina.” This is from the release that accompanied the report:

The worst of the Great Recession is behind us, but the damage lingers, weighing down communities and families across North Carolina. We are now seven years removed from the financial crisis of 2008, but in North Carolina wages are down, job creation is lagging, and many communities are still stuck in recession.

Given all of the positive headlines lately, it’s easy to get the impression that the recovery is in full swing. Last year was the best since the financial crisis, with North Carolina and the nation finally getting back to the number of jobs that existed before the recession. The unemployment rate has also been dropping since the bottom of the Great Recession in 2009. However, these positive trends do not tell the whole story, particularly in North Carolina.

There are still not enough jobs for everyone who wants to work in North Carolina, but that’s far from the only problem. Simply put, North Carolina’s economy is not working for everyone:

Growth without prosperity: Economic output has rebounded nicely since the worst days of the recession, but it is not translating into larger paychecks for many North Carolinians. Adjusting for inflation, gross state product—which measures the value of all goods and services sold—is up 18.5% compared to 2007, but wages are actually down slightly. Read More

Uncategorized

SmokeIn an allusion to the signal that’s seen in the Vatican when the leaders of the Catholic Church elect a new Pope, at least one news media report this morning is talking about “white smoke” being visible on Jones Street. The story accompanying the headline, of course, is that leaders of the North Carolina General Assembly signaled over the weekend that they have agreement on the framework of a state budget deal. Assuming it really comes to fruition, the agreement comes a full month into the 2015 fiscal year.

A closer look at those puffs of smoke, however, reveals them to bear a notably blue tinge — that is, the kind one typically see with an engine that’s leaking oil and about to blow. As Alexandra Sirota details in the post immediately below and Chris Fitzsimon highlights in this morning’s “Monday Numbers,” one important impetus for the agreement would appear to be the latest calculations of the General Assembly’s Fiscal Research Division staff that the income tax cuts enacted last year are harming state budget revenues even more than had been officially forecast – i.e. more along the lines of what the Budget and Tax Center has been predicting all along.

So, keep in mind a couple of things this week as lawmakers and the Governor are falling all over themselves to issue statements of  self-congratulations:

1) Notwithstanding their rosy claims, the engine driving state government — the tax system — remains cracked and badly in need of an overhaul.

2) The current proposed solution — rolling up the window and ignoring the smoke — will provide only a temporary solution at best.

Uncategorized

Jobs ImageAs state lawmakers continue to go about the business of overhauling important aspects of state government “on the fly” with complex, last-minute proposals that receive only superficial review in kangaroo committee meetings — see, for example, the Senate’s latest mad effort to privatize the state’s Medicaid system in the waning days of the 2014 session — here’s something new and unusual: an actual thorough and thoughtful report on a critically important and under-reported subject that’s not just a collection of soundbites.

The report, not surprisingly, comes from the good folks at the N.C Budget and Tax Center and it deals with the unsexy but vital subject of how North Carolina rebuilds its middle class. The central finding: We ain’t gonna’ succeed by trying to do it on the cheap and/or relying upon race-to-the-bottom tax cuts and low-wage jobs. This is from the release that accompanied the report this morning: Read More

NC Budget and Tax Center

In case you’ve missed it, there has been a phenomenal film series going on this summer throughout North Carolina, which concludes this month with screenings of “Inequality for All” in nine cities from July 22nd – July 31st. The Moral Movies film series, which also included showings of American Teacher, American Winter and Freedom Summer, is sponsored by Working Films, NC NAACP, NCAE, Tar Heel Alliance of Classroom Teachers, Democracy NC, NC State AFL-CIO, NC Justice Center and a number of local partners.

The films offer a way for North Carolinians to see informative documentaries on multiple issues such as education, poverty, workers’ rights, voting rights, civil rights and inequality, and discuss their implications in the context of our state’s current policy environment and the continuing march towards social and economic justice. Following each film, attendees are provided opportunities to take action to improve the lives of all North Carolinians through improving investments in education, raising wages for workers, ensuring broader access to voting rights, or decreasing a widening income and wealth gap. Hundreds have attended one or more of the films in the series around the state, which kicked off in April with American Teacher.

The last film in the series, Inequality for All, features Robert Reich – professor, best-selling author, and Clinton cabinet member – as he demonstrates how the widening income gap is having a devastating impact on the American economy. Reich suggests that the massive consolidation of wealth by a precious few threatens the viability of the American workforce and the foundation of democracy itself. The film unfortunately resonates clearly with North Carolina’s experience given that recent legislative developments such as continued underinvestment in education and economic development, a lopsided tax plan giving big breaks to wealthy taxpayers and corporations while increasing taxes on the majority of working families, limitations to living wage policy and inaction to move towards a living wage has contributed to growing inequality.

Don’t miss your last chance to participate in Moral Movies and register to attend a screening near you this month:

Schedule of Screenings:

Winston Salem: Tuesday July 22, 6 p.m. (RSVP)

Green Street United Methodist Church, 639 S Green St, Winston-Salem, NC 27101

Fayetteville: Tuesday July 22, 6 p.m. (RSVP)

The Main Library, 300 Maiden Lane, Fayetteville, NC, 28301

Asheville: Friday July 25, 7 p.m. (RSVP)

Ferguson Auditorium at AB Tech, 340 Victoria Rd. Asheville NC 28801

Greenville: Tuesday July 29, 7 p.m. (RSVP)

Unitarian Universalist Congregation, 131 Oakmont Dr. Greenville, NC 27858

Raleigh: Tuesday, July 29, 7 p.m. (RSVP)

Community UCC, 814 Dixie Trail, Raleigh, NC 27607

Durham: Thursday July 31, 6:30 p.m. (RSVP)

Durham County Public Library Auditorium, 300 N Roxboro St. Durham, NC 27701

Greensboro: Thursday, July 31, 7 p.m. (RSVP)

Central Library Nussbaum Room, 219 N Church St. Greensboro, NC 27405

Wilmington: Thursday, July 31, 7 p.m. (RSVP)

Cameron Art Museum, 3201 S. 17th St. Wilmington, NC 28412

Charlotte: Thursday, July 31, 7 p.m. (RSVP)

Unitarian Universalist Church of Charlotte 234 N Sharon Amity Rd, Charlotte, NC, 28211