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Still trying to make sense of the 2012 General Assembly?

The Executive Director of the N.C. Center for Public Policy Research joined us in studio last week to discuss the winners and losers following the contentious, short legislative session.

Ran Coble shares his thoughts on the depth of the cuts that were made in state spending, fact-checks the claims the budget will lead to new job creation, and weighs in on the fall elections.

Coble also explains why he believes the worst decision of the two-year session may have been  the General Assembly’s override of Gov. Beverly Perdue’s veto of a bill that gives all North Carolina community colleges the ability to refuse to participate in a low-interest federal student loan program.

“And I just think that’s a travesty for the kids in community college trying to get money to pay for an education,” explains Coble.

To hear an excerpt of Coble’s radio interview with Chris Fitzsimon, click below. To download a podcast of the full interview or listen online, visit the Radio Interview section of the N.C. Policy Watch website:

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Picking up right where the legislature left off last year, the newly-passed House Budget again targets the Clean Water Management Trust Fund with policy changes that will likely gut the long-term effectiveness of the state’s primary capital investment resource for developing clean water infrastructure in North Carolina’s rural communities.

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Most people paying attention to the American economy over the least few decades are already well-aware that “trickledown economics” – the notion that if the rich are allowed to gorge themselves, significant wealth will “trickle down” to folks at the lower levels — is hogwash. As has been shown repeatedly, the gap between the rich and everyone else continues to grow at an alarming rate.

This morning, however, we do see compelling evidence of another kind of trickledown effect that is real; it’s taking place right here in North Carolina. This trickledown effect involves the state budget and its impact in the real world.

Here’s how it works: Read More

A lot of good folks are providing excellent, up-to-the-minute coverage of the State Board of Education hearing todayat which county school superintendents are speaking up on the reality they confront. It sounds like the shortsighted budget-cutting policies of the General Assembly are being raked over the coals.

Check out  https://twitter.com/Fitzsimon,  https://twitter.com/SarahOvaska, https://twitter.com/NC_Children,  https://twitter.com/ProgressNow_NC and   https://twitter.com/nckidscountjust to name a few.

 

 

The N.C. House Select Committee on Education Reform will meet at 1 p.m. this afternoon, moving their meeting away from the N.C. General Assembly building to the campus of Wake Technical Community College.

But just what they’ll be talking about is still a bit of a mystery this morning, just a few hours before the meeting is scheduled to begin.

No agendas have been released to the public, according to the office of N.C. Rep. Hugh Blackwell, the co-chair of the House committee.

Update: Since we put up this post at 10:30 a.m. this morning, the agenda to the meeting has been posted. Click here to see for yourself.  A hat tip to Terry Stoops at the conservative John Locke Foundation for pointing out that the agenda items were released a couple of hours before the public meeting. 

On the agenda are discussion about a deaf student’s Bill of Rights, a Florida Advanced Placement initiative, articulation issues in higher education, school air quality improvements and higher education tuition comparisons.

And that means no clues to the public about what this group of legislators will be discussing, and who they’ll be hearing from.

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