NC Budget and Tax Center

The latest quarterly revenue report by the General Assembly’s Fiscal Research Division (FRD) highlights that tax cuts do not explain the better-than-projected income tax revenue collections for the most recent fiscal year 2015.

According to FRD, two factors likely affected income tax collections for the most recent fiscal year.

  • Corporate taxable profits accelerated as wages remained low and write-offs on losses from the recession dwindled. This pushed collections 21.2% above forecast expectations.
  • Timing in personal income tax collections from changes enacted beginning with the 2014 tax year meant lower monthly withholding revenue – but higher final payments and smaller refunds in April. The forecast didn’t fully capture those dynamics leading to a shortfall the previous fiscal year and a surplus in FY 2014-15.

There’s evidence to support these two points. Corporate profits are at a record high as the economy recovers in part due to a steady increase in productivity. Meanwhile, wages for workers have remained stagnant – an indication that workers have not participated in the economic gains during the ongoing recovery. Furthermore, FRD notes that tax changes in recent years made it difficult to determine the timing of income tax revenue collections, resulting in a projection that was well below actual collections for FY 2014-15. Read More

NC Budget and Tax Center

Many pundits and outlets are describing the joint budget deal as a “compromise” between the inadequate House and Senate budgets. But North Carolinians from Murphy to Manteo know that we cannot compromise our future.

By pursuing deeper tax cuts, policymakers have failed to strengthen public education, public health, and safety, and the other building blocks of a strong economy.

The new tax plan will lose $383.6 million over a two-year period, with the annual loss ballooning to $692.9 million by the fifth year. Revenue losses will grow by another $458 million over the next two years when accounting for corporate tax breaks that are already scheduled to go into effect. All of these revenue losses will add to the damage from the 2013 tax cuts, which result in $1 billion in lost revenue each year when fully implemented.

That’s why it’s no surprise that there are a lot of investments in vital public services that are needed but missing from the new budget deal, like public education, public health and safety, and rural economic development. There has been plenty of coverage of what is in the budget over the last day and a half but there has been little coverage of what’s not in the budget.

Below is a short list of investments that are missing in action but still greatly needed to build a stronger, more inclusive economy for us all. Read More

NC Budget and Tax Center

Yesterday, legislative leadership unveiled a joint budget deal that puts the train on the wrong tracks by pursuing deeper tax cuts at the expense of strengthening public education, public health and safety, and the other building blocks of a strong economy. The deal includes another costly round of income tax cuts, additional tax breaks for selected industries, and an expansion in the sales tax base to include installation, repair, and maintenance services. The tax plan will lose $383.6 million over a two-year period, with the annual loss ballooning to $692.9 million in by the fifth year.

The state Senate is scheduled to give preliminary approval of the 500-plus page deal at 2pm today and final approval tomorrow, despite its 11:30pm release last evening. The House is expected to vote on the deal as early as Thursday, with it headed to the Governor’s desk after a final vote. The stop-gap spending measure that is currently in place expires Friday at midnight and would need to be extended for a fourth time if a final budget deal is not in place by then.

While most of the public budget debate this week will be on the spending side, examining how lawmakers pay for the budget deal is just as important. This is especially true due to this new round of costly tax cuts that come on top of the $1 billion annual tax cuts approved two years ago. Both tax plans drain resources that otherwise could have been used to build opportunity and replace the worst cuts enacted since the economic downturn. Read More


As rumors continue to swirl on Jones Street about a deal reached Friday night on the FY2015-2017 budget (details to be released Monday), investments in North Carolina’s community colleges and workforce development programs remain an area of critical concern. These programs are essential for improving the skills and competitiveness of our labor force and ensuring that low-income workers have accesses to the training resources they need to achieve long-term upward mobility in their careers and lifetime earnings.

Job training and basic adult education are critical investments that give workers—especially those at the bottom of the income scale—the tools they need to enter higher-wage occupations. For many, these programs can mean the difference between a life trapped in poverty-wage jobs and a life with opportunities to climb the career ladder and enter the middle class. Career pathway programs in particular create avenues for workers to build occupation-specific skills consecutively over the course of a career, creating stepping stones for long-term advancement within that occupation.

As a result, these programs provide a powerful policy-level antidote to income inequality and wage stagnation. As the recent State of Working North Carolina report points out, wages remained largely flat in decade prior to Great Recession and then experienced significant decline in years since the recession. This is largely the result of policies that allowed corporate executives and investors to earn the lion’s share of increased productivity achieved by technological advancements.

Building skills through job training and workforce development is an important tool for returning these productivity gains to workers—both by strengthening the ability of individual workers to bargain for better wages and by improving the overall recognized skills of the state’s workforce, a key competitive advantage that will create more quality jobs in North Carolina.

Given this reality, all eyes are on the emerging final budget deal to see how legislators treat these important programs. Thus far in the budget debate, the Senate has cut more funding for these investments than the House in its proposal. In the House proposal passed earlier this summer, the Community College System received a $52 million cut compared to the $59 million cut served up by the Senate. Similarly, the House provides $15 in new money for instructional equipment at the community colleges, while the Senate provides just $5 million. And while the House provides $1.9 million for job training in economically struggling areas, the Senate does not, instead opting to invest $1.5 million to put community college “coaches” in high schools with the goal of helping high school students transition into vocational training programs upon graduation.

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NC Budget and Tax Center

As we edge closer to the 16th anniversary of Hurricane Floyd, it is important to review the vital role that state emergency funds play when disaster strikes. Lawmakers in North Carolina tapped into state “rainy day funds” to help cope with the storm’s aftermath: the cost of providing assistance to families in need and rebuilding destroyed communities. Unfortunately, the North Carolina Senate is seeking to weaken access to our rainy day fund, even in times of true emergency.

Floyd, which hit about a week and a half after Tropical Storm Dennis, caused some Tar Heel families to lose loved ones, jobs, and all of their possessions in drowned cities. The storm caused $6 billion in damage and destroyed entire communities, including homes, farms, and businesses. Response efforts also put stress on the state budget, causing mid-year budget freezes and cuts totaling $504 million.

There is no doubt that the state’s response would have been far weaker in the absence of state and federal emergency funds. Then-Governor Hunt called a special session and North Carolina lawmakers approved nearly $286 million to be pulled out of the rainy day fund, which supplemented $838 million in federal emergency funds to support the response efforts. Read More