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Good news last night in Boone. This is from the ACLU of North Carolina:

Watauga Board Votes to Keep “The House of the Spirits” in Honors High School Curriculum
ACLU of North Carolina Joined Parents, Students and Community Members Earlier in the Day to Rally in Support of the Freedom to Read  

BOONE, N.C. – The Watauga County Board of Education tonight voted 3-2 to keep Isabel Allende’s “The House of the Spirits” in the county’s public school curriculum for sophomore honors English students after a challenge to the board had been brought. Two board-sanctioned committees had previously voted unanimously to keep the book in the curriculum.  

Chris Brook, Legal Director for the ACLU-NC Legal Foundation, released the following statement: Read More

As noted here yesterday, it’s not at all clear that the book banning efforts of religious conservatives in the Brunswick County schools were put to rest with the recent vote to keep Alice Walker’s The Color Purple  on the reading list for some students. Happily, the good folks at the ACLU of North Carolina are digging a little deeper to find out what’s really going on and what’s behind the book banning efforts. This was released this morning:

BOLIVIA, NC – The American Civil Liberties Union of North Carolina Legal Foundation (ACLU-NCLF) yesterday sent a public records request to the Brunswick County Board of Education and the Brunswick County Board of Commissioners seeking all communications between officials related to recent efforts to ban Alice Walker’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, “The Color Purple,” from Brunswick County Advanced Placement (AP) English classes.

The public records request, filed under North Carolina public records laws, also seeks communications regarding any other proposed curriculum changes or plans for banning other works of literature from Brunswick County public schools going back to the 2012-2013 school year. Read More

Book bansBad news for those who had hoped that the move by religious conservatives to ban Alice Walker’s The Color Purple in the Brunswick County schools had run out of steam once and for all with the 3-2 “no” vote on January 3. Judging by the comments of chief book ban champion, board member Catherine Cooke, things may just be getting warmed up.

Check out the video from the January 7 school board meeting in which Cooke goes on a semi-coherent rant (it’s at the 48 minute mark) about how “our Founding Fathers established our universities and our schools on Christian principles,” how she will continue to battle “things that are not decent,” and how she plans to continue to go over curricula and related items with a “fine-toothed comb.”

Sigh….Yet more compelling evidence that there are few tougher jobs in the Republic than serving on a local school board beset by the religious right.

The board meets again next Tuesday the 21st.

(Photo: ACLU of North Carolina)

As noted in this morning’s edition of the Weekly Briefing,  there are lots of important reasons to be deeply concerned about the decision of a political group funded almost exclusively by the state Budget Director to demand the private correspondence of a prominent McCrory administration critic.

ICYMI, however, Professor Paul Carrington of the Duke University School of Law (the school’s former Dean) authored a column (and then an exchange of letters to the editor - click here for the Civitas letter)  in the Durham Herald-Sun  in recent days that sheds additional light on the subject.

Here is Carrington’s most recent on-the-money take — which was published last Friday:

Civitas not telling whole story about Nichol Read More

From the good folks at the ACLU-NC:

Randolph Board Votes to Reverse Ban on “Invisible Man”
ACLU of NC Says Episode is Valuable Reminder of Duty to Promote Academic Freedom and Reject Censorship

ASHEBORO – Tonight, the Randolph County Board of Education voted 6-1 to reverse its previous vote banning Ralph Ellison’s literary classic, “The Invisible Man,” from Randolph County schools.

In response, Chris Brook, Legal Director for the American Civil Liberties Union of North Carolina Legal Foundation (ACLU-NCLF) released the following statement:

“Tonight, the Randolph County Board of Education righted a wrong. The freedom to read is just as essential to a healthy democracy as the freedom of speech and all other rights protected by the U.S. Constitution. This episode should serve as a valuable reminder to students, teachers, parents, and school officials across the state of our ongoing duty to promote academic freedom, ensure the free exchange of ideas and information, and reject the always looming threat that censorship and suppression, for any reason, pose to a free society.”