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Caring and thinking North Carolinians should utter a word of thanks today to some dedicated advocates and activists working to make sure that all who wish to vote can do so. Of particular note are:

1) The legal experts at the UNC Center for Civil Rights, which is hosting a national voter protection hotline today. As the group noted in a news release yesterday:

UNC School of Law students, with other community volunteers, are staffing a toll-free, non-partisan hotline to answer voter questions on Election Day, Tuesday November 4th, as part of Election Protection, a national voter advocacy effort. Voters can call 1-866-OUR-VOTE (866-687-8683) or 1-888-VE-Y VOTA (888-839-8682) with questions about their rights and the voting process….This November is the first major election after the passage of North Carolina House Bill 589, which significantly changed the voting laws in North Carolina. The Election Protection Hotline will provide resources to support voters at the polling place. Voters can call the Hotline to report any problems they encounter or witness at the polls, verify their registration status, or find their polling location.

and, 2) the student activists at Ignite NC. This is from a release that group distributed this morning: Read More

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The dean of the University of North Carolina’s law school is stepping down, saying that he wants to make room for new leadership to steer an upcoming fundraising campaign and ambitious curriculum changes.

Jack Boger, 68, who has served as dean since 2006, will stay on the job until July 2015 and then continue to teach at the Chapel Hill campus, according to a news release from the law school.

UNC’s Jack Boger

Boger said he wanted to ensure a new dean would be in place to run a large capital campaign expected to begin in the next year or two.

“It’s better to use that pause to bring in the next runner,” Boger said, comparing the leadership of the school to a relay race.

Boger has taught at the university for a quarter-century, and was a deputy director at the law school’s Center for Civil Rights before his 2006 appointment to lead the law school. He will return to the classroom and teach classes in education law, constitutional law and racial discrimination.

Boger found himself recently in the public spotlight when members of the UNC board of governors and university administrators became alarmed over highly critical columns UNC law professor Gene Nichol has been writing about policies under Republican Gov. Pat McCrory. Among the most controversial was an October editorial in the News & Observer where Nichol, a tenured professor and director of the UNC Center on Poverty, Work and Opportunity, compared McCrory to Jim Crow-era Southern politicians for backing restrictive changes to the state’s voting laws.

(Note: Nichol is a board member of the N.C. Justice Center, the larger anti-poverty non-profit that N.C. Policy Watch is a part of).

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State of ExclusionThe UNC Center for Civil Rights has released a new report as part of a series of in-depth examinations of exclusion and the legacy of racial segregation in individual counties. The subject is Lenoir County in southeastern North Carolina. Both the Lenoir study and last year’s overarching report, “State of Exclusion,” are available by clicking here. This is from the release that accompanied the new Lenoir County study:

“In the middle of the Black Belt of Eastern North Carolina, Lenoir County is divided between its mostly white rural population and the concentrated African American populations in Kinston and La Grange. This new report focuses on the impact of the racial segregation on public education, political representation, and utility service.  Profiles of other counties will follow in the coming weeks, each highlighting particular aspects of that county’s history, ongoing impacts of exclusion, and progress toward full inclusion of all residents.

The county-wide school district in Lenoir County is the result of the 1992 merger of the majority white county school system with the majority African American Kinston city school district. Despite the merger, educational segregation persists because of an inequitable assignment model. Read More