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(Image: AFL-CIO / paywatch.org)

Just when you thought things couldn’t get much worse on the American inequality front, you encounter reports like the new “Executive Paywatch” report from the AFL-CIO.

Click here to check out the website — it includes a section in which you can view CEO pay by state. And while the top guys (and they’re almost all guys – 67 out of 69) in North Carolina aren’t as obscenely wealthy as they are in New York or Texas, the gap remains huge; the ratio of CEO pay to that of the average worker in North Carolina is 108 to 1.

 

 

 

Lunch sandwich

TGIF indeed. Well, it’s been another fun week in the North Carolina policy world. And as usual, one of the best end-of-the-week wrap-ups can be found in Friday Follies. Today, Chris Fitzsimon has the latest on the conclusion to Gov. McCrory’s terrible, no good, very bad month and, from the looks of things, what promises to be a lousy start to September as well.

Meanwhile, all the hubbub and protests of the last few weeks over the General Assembly’s disastrous 2013 legislative session appear to be stirring at least the beginnings of a smidgen of regret and remorse. Ann Doss Helms of the Charlotte Observer reports that two GOP state reps from Mecklenburg are making noises about at least softening the impact of the absurd decision to do away with the pay bump that teachers have long received for obtaining a master’s degree. There’s no indication, however, that conservative lawmakers have any interest in reversing their decision as they should.

And speaking of people admitting errors, Steve Benen at The Maddow Blog has a rare sighting to report: a direct and sincere apology from Fox Noise blowhard Bill O’Reilly. Read More

Here’s an idea that would, despite being far from foolproof, seem to be worth at least considering in the U.S.: Australia’s law to require significant corporate shareholder majorities to approve CEO compensation plans.

This is from the the people at Inequality.org and their weekly newsletter Too Much:

“One of the world’s more complicated schemes to tamp down CEO pay is getting a test in Australia this fall. Since last July, Aussie corporate boards have had shareholders voting on CEO pay. But this advisory “say on pay” has a twist. A board that fails to get 25 percent of shareholders to bless its CEO pay two years in a row has to face a shareholder vote on whether to give the entire board a heave-ho and elect a new one. Last year, 108 firms failed to hit that 25 percent mark. Now boards seem anxious to avoid two-time loser status. CEO bonuses at top Australian firms have dipped 20 percent since last year. But execs, activists add, are still playing games: Aquila Resources chair Tony Poli had his most recent annual pay reported as $572,000. He actually took in $169 million.”