N.C. Sen. Jeff Jackson

State Sen. Jeff Jackson managed to make it into work this morning —  one of the only people to do so after ice and snow shut down the Republican-led state legislature.

The Charlotte Democrat, an attorney with less than a term under his belt, unexpectedly found himself the most powerful person in the building.

He was quick to take advantage of the situation.

Check out Jackson’s Twitter feed and Facebook page this morning, where he’s detailing a one-man takeover of the N.C. General Assembly under the hashtag #JustOneLegislator.

And then there’s that hang-up over puppy mills, after a bill banning them stalled last year. Not to worry, Jackson tweeted.    

He’s also got a little something to bring back home.

Of course, it’ll be an uphill battle for any of these to come to fruition this session, but a lawmaker in the minority party can dream, can’t he? Keep following Jackson on Twitter here, he’s also taking requests on his Facebook page. Stay safe, everyone. UPDATE: Jackson’s been hard at work while most of us are watching the ice slowly thaw at home.

He even defeated his own filibuster.


Per the Charlotte Observer, Superior Court Judge Robert Ervin has blocked the transfer of control of Charlotte Douglas International Airport, pending a decision from the FAA about the change:

The ruling came at the end of a hearing Thursday in which the city argued that the N.C. General Assembly overreached its legal authority by passing a law to change who runs the airport.

Much of the hearing so far focused on the Federal Aviation Administration’s role in approving the change and on whether the legislation was incorrectly handled as a “local bill” that did not go through the governor for either a veto or signature.

The city won a temporary order two weeks ago, saying the General Assembly’s bill to create a 13-member airport commission is unconstitutional and will cause “irreparable harm” to the city.

Under the commission legislation passed last week, the city will still own Charlotte Douglas. But the commission will operate the airport, awarding contracts, hiring and firing the executive director, and charting expansion plans.

The City Council and mayor would appoint seven of the 13 members.

The Democratic-controlled City Council and the GOP-dominated General Assembly have fought over the airport since January.