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The Charlotte Observer had an article yesterday about the nonprofit public hospital system Carolinas Health Care cutting $110 million from its budget next year, largely in management positions that are currently vacant.

The large hospital system cited the need for cuts as stemming from decisions by both North Carolina and South Carolina politicians to turn down federal Medicaid expansion dollars, as well as other decisions made at the state and federal level related to Medicaid and Medicare. The $4 billion hospital system — which operates 40 hospitals in the Carolinas and Georgia — says it’s been left treating large numbers of poor patients unable to access health insurance or pay their health bills.

North Carolina is one of 21 states to opt out of the Medicaid expansion, which would provide health care for an estimated 400,000 low-income North Carolinians who are currently uninsured. (Click here for updated list of where different states stand on expansion).

From the Observer article:

[Carolinas HealthCare CEO Michael} Tarwater blamed much of the financial stress on cutbacks in state and federal programs. For example, he said North Carolina legislators have for a second year declined to accept federal funds to expand Medicaid. That contributed to the system’s unreimbursed charges, which rose to $668 million in the first half of this year, an increase of 9.4 percent over last year.

“We’re not treating this as a crisis … but it is a challenge,” Tarwater said. “I can assure you we have a solid plan, and we have the team in place to carry it out. I’m certain that we’ll emerge stronger and more competitive.”

 

You can read the entire article here.

News

North Carolina news media haven’t reported much about an arrest by Charlotte police that took place late yesterday during the Moral Monday/#TalkUnion Labor Day rally that took place in the city’s Marshall Park.

Think Progress, however, has quite a few details plus video in this story: “Police Arrest Young Black Politician for Distributing Voting Rights Leaflets.” According to the story:

The stars of North Carolina’s Moral Mondays movement took the stage on Labor Day at Charlotte’s Marshall Park to condemn the state’s record on voter suppression and racial profiling, and urge the community to organize and turn out at the polls this November. Just a few hundred feet away, police cuffed and arrested local LGBT activist and former State Senate candidate Ty Turner as he was putting voting rights information on parked cars.

“They said they would charge me for distributing literature,” Turner told ThinkProgress when he was released a few hours later. “I asked [the policeman] for the ordinance number [being violated], because they can’t put handcuffs on you if they cannot tell you why they’re detaining you. I said, ‘Show me where it’s illegal to do this.’ But he would not do it. The officer got mad and grabbed me. Then he told me that I was resisting arrest!”

You can watch a video of the affair and read more about the ultimately successful efforts of Rev. William Barber and other NAACP officials to secure Turner’s release by clicking here.

Uncategorized

Pat McCrory 2It’s good to know that while things are going to hell in a handbasket during the busiest time of the year in the state capital, North Carolina’s fearless leader will be right in the mix doing what he almost always does on Friday — scheduling “official” events in Charlotte so that he can spend the weekend in his actual home. Today — and we’re not making this up — it’s a doggie photo shoot.

Here is the Guv’s official schedule for today: Read More

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Patrick CannonBy all (or at least, most) indications. Charlotte’s disgraced former mayor Patrick Cannon is a rather pathetic, small-time crook. Though it’s hard to know exactly how someone with such a massive character flaw will behave in every circumstance, it seems a safe bet that he would be “on the make” in just about any circumstance — whatever the laws and rules governing the people who run for public office.

That said, Cannon’s swift and pathetic fall should serve as yet another powerful reminder of the corrosive and corrupting influence of money in politics — especially for those people who are not independently wealthy (or, at least, whose wealth does not match their perceived status). The hard truth of the matter is that it is very difficult to be an effective elected official in 2014 without: a) lots of your own money or, b) lots of someone else’s money. Part of this is just a matter of the way money can insulate people from temptation, but another big part revolves around how money can assure that a person will have a good chance at getting re-elected (and thus be taken more seriously while in office).

And , of course, the reason for the latter truth is the simple fact that Read More