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NC Policy Watch follower Betsy Caudle Lowman of Boone recently sent us the following essay — we hope you will enjoy it.

U.S. declines into “de-MOCK-racy”
By Betsy Caudle Lowman

Each year The Economist, a conservative British news magazine, rates the nations of the world on the degree to which they operate according to democratic principles. This year, Norway replaced Sweden at the top of the heap. The United States is not included in the highest category, which includes Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, Canada, Australia, Germany, France, and Britain. Should this surprise anyone?  Americans love to believe they have government “of the people, by the people, and for the people,” but this has never been less true than at present.  Read More

Art Pope 3This is from this morning’s Washington Post:

“The third Koch ‘brother’ hits North Carolina

By

There’s something rotten in the state of North Carolina — and it smells like money. Specifically, Art Pope’s money.

In fact, Pope and his cash are responsible for North Carolina’s recent meteoric rise as the poster child for regressive, conservative politics.

As the head of Variety Wholesalers (a family-run discount store holding company) and the $150 million Pope Family Foundation, he has invested in an array of think tanks and advocacy groups dedicated to aggressively aligning the state’s political terrain with his business interests. Gov. Pat McCrory, whose campaign he bankrolled, recently named Pope to the powerful post of state budget director.

Pope is, for all intents and purposes, North Carolina’s third, lesser known, Koch brother. In fact, he’s attended the Koch Brothers’ planning summits and considers himself their close ally. Read More

You may recall a short while back, after the tragedy in Newtown, how the California State Teachers Retirement System learned that its $500 million investment commitment to private equity group Cerberus Capital Management was headed to a company with a controlling interest in North Carolina-based Freedom Group, maker of the Bushmaster assault rifle used in the shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary School.

Needless to say, the group of current and retired teachers were none too happy to learn that their hard-earned dollars were funding assault weapons and quickly announced that they were reviewing that commitment. The group’s response to its very public discovery, coinciding with national outrage over the shootings and renewed calls for gun control legislation, caused Cerberus to announce just days later that it was selling its interest in Freedom Group.

Now comes another pension group, the New York State Common Retirement Fund, that is likewise seeking to exercise its shareholders rights to dictate the behavior of companies in which it invests — this time taking aim at the corporate political spending unleashed by the U.S. Supreme Court’s Citizens United decision. Read More

It’s been months since the North Carolina Judicial Coalition sprang on to the election scene as an upstart in the otherwise sleepy world of judicial elections.

State and national media portrayed the super PAC—formed by former state Republican Party chair Tom Fetzer, conservative businessman Bob Luddy (founder of the private Thales Academy schools) and others to help finance the re-election of sitting Supreme Court Justice Paul Newby—as an example of the unlimited campaign spending that could be unleashed by the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, and a particularly dangerous one, given that judges were involved.

Unlike Newby and his Democratic challenger Court of Appeals Judge Sam Ervin IV, who’ve both accepted public financing, PACs like the Judicial Coalition have no limits on how much they collect and spend, other than they can’t contribute directly to a candidate committee. They are otherwise free to support or oppose candidates as they see fit.

So what’s the Judicial Coalition been up to since June?

Tough to tell, since it has yet to tell the state board of elections how much money it’s raised and how it’s spent that money. Read More