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Voting rightsIt’s only August, but this is still a busy time when it comes to North Carolina elections. In accordance with state law, county boards of elections across the state are meeting today to appoint precinct judges for the upcoming local elections.

But what else will they do?

Will some counties look to close early voting sites located on college campuses? Indeed that is already happening is some parts of the state. 

Within a week of Governor Pat McCrory signing the new monster elections bill into law, several counties started taking unprecedented steps to make voting harder for all college students.

Last Monday, the Watauga County board of elections voted to eliminate the early voting site that had been located at Appalachian State University’s student center.

The following day, on the other end of the state, the board of elections in Pasquotank County went a step further in ruling Elizabeth City State University students may not run for local office and possibly will be barred from voting in future local elections.

And last Friday, the chair of the Forsyth County board of elections indicated his desire to have the board shut down the early voting polling site located at Winston Salem State University. 

So, who’s next?   Read More

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Today is the last day to register for tomorrow’s NC Policy Watch Crucial Conversation with former Federal Communications Commission chairman, Dr. Michael Copps:  “Big money, dark money: The threat posed to our democracy by media consolidation and secretly-funded elections.”   

The event is co-sponsored by Common Cause of North Carolina and will take place at 12 noon at the Junior League of Raleigh building. The cost is just $10 and features a box lunch that will be available at 11:45.

Hope to see you there!

Click here to register and get for more details.

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Big money, dark money: The threat posed to our democracy by media consolidation and secretly-funded elections

Featuring the former Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, Dr. Michael Copps.

Co-sponsored by Common Cause North Carolina.

Few developments in modern America pose a greater threat to the health of our democracy than the rapid consolidation of media corporations and the equally speedy demise of voter-funded elections. Increasingly, control of both our telecommunications infrastructure and our political campaigns rest in the hands of a comparatively tiny (and sometimes-overlapping) group of super-wealthy individuals and corporations.

For decades, Michael Copps has been battling these destructive trends and advancing common sense solutions – first as a longtime staff person in the U.S. Senate, then as Assistant Secretary of Commerce, and, from 2001 to 2009, as one of five commissioners of the Federal Communications Commission.

Don’t miss this important opportunity to hear from this incredibly knowledgeable voice of reason on these critically important subjects.

Click here to register Read More

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Raleigh will play host to two excellent events next week that will shine a light on the efforts by big money to purchase our government.

On Tuesday evening February 19, the national executive director of Common Cause, Bob Edgar, will be in town to lead a discussion of the growing and pernicious influence of the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC). The event will take place at Pullen Memorial Baptist Church, 1801 Hillsborough Street at 7:00 pm. RSVP by contacting NC Common Cause Director Bob Phillips at 919-836-0027 or bphillips@commoncause.org.

Two days later, at 12 noon on February 21, NC Policy Watch will team up with Common Cause for a special Crucial Conversation luncheon:

Big money, dark money: The threat posed to our democracy by media consolidation and secretly-funded elections – Featuring the former Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, Dr. Michael Copps.

The luncheon will take place at the Center for Community Leadership Training Room at the Junior League of Raleigh Building, 711 Hillsborough St. at the corner of Hillsborough and St. Mary’s Streets).

Click here for more information and to register.