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In case you missed it, the Education Writers Association blog has an interesting story about teacher attitudes toward Common Core. Here is the opening:

In a new survey, teachers say they’re feeling more confident about using the Common Core State Standards in their classrooms — an optimistic finding that comes even as recent polls suggest dwindling public support for the initiative. Read More

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At yesterday’s first meeting of the North Carolina Academic Standards Review Commission, which is tasked with reviewing the Common Core State Standards and suggesting modifications or replacements to those guidelines in English language arts and math, newly-elected co-chair Jeannie Metcalf didn’t make known her position on whether the standards should stay or go — but her Facebook page indicates she opposes them.

Metcalf, a Winston-Salem/Forsyth school board member, confirmed on Tuesday that she administers the Facebook page RE-elect Jeannie Metcalf for School Board. Her page is peppered with links from noted tea partier and anti-Common Core activist Glenn Beck, N.C. Lieutenant Governor and Common Core opponent Dan Forest, and other stories that portray Common Core in a negative light.

Back in May, Metcalf declared herself an opponent of Common Core, citing a California story about how teachers in the Rialto school district came up with a writing assignment that asked students to write a persuasive essay about whether or not the Holocaust actually happened. The assignment was meant to satisfy a Common Core standard for critical thinking; however, there is nothing in the Common Core standards that invites this particular assignment, according to Washington Post journalist Valerie Strauss.Capture

Jeannie Metcalf (click here to read more about her) will co-chair the Academic Standards Review Commission with pro-Common Core IBM executive Andre Peek. The next meeting of the review commission should be held sometime in October.

UPDATE: Metcalf emailed N.C. Policy Watch on Tuesday to say she does oppose Common Core.
“I will say I am much more concerned that the math standards be revamped. The ELA standards have some good points,” said Metcalf. “My co chair is chairman of the NC Business Committee for Education, which is solidly behind common core so I thinks it’s good to have different perspectives moving forward,” Metcalf added.

News

CommonCore_NC1At the first meeting of the Academic Standards Review Commission, which is tasked with reviewing and potentially replacing the Common Core State Standards, co-chair and Gov. Pat McCrory appointee Andre Peek told N.C. Policy Watch upon the meeting’s conclusion Monday afternoon that he is a supporter of Common Core and has been “since its inception.”

Peek, an executive at IBM, said “I do realize it’s [Common Core] a divisive issue for our state, though. But I don’t know the details of why…so through the efforts of this commission we’ll get to the facts…and how to change it to be more effective for our state,” adding that any changes made will be based on fact and not just a feeling of “we don’t like it.”

Peek will co-chair the Academic Standards Review Commission along with Jeannie Metcalf, who sits on the Winston-Salem/Forsyth State Board of Education.

Metcalf, who is an appointee of Senate leader Phil Berger and has no background in teaching, told N.C. Policy Watch last month about her qualifications to serve: “I’ve read lots of magazines and I go to lots of meetings…and so I got myself a self-guided education in curriculum standards in North Carolina and how they’ve changed over the years.”

For a full run down of the first meeting of the Academic Standards Review Commission, look for my story tomorrow morning over at www.ncpolicywatch.com

News

Final appointments have been made today to a North Carolina political commission tasked with reviewing the implementation of the Common Core State Standards—well past a September 1 deadline by which the commission was required by law to hold its first meeting. The first meeting will take place Monday, September 22.

Governor Pat McCrory was one of the last state leaders to make his lone appointment to the commission, IBM executive Andre Peek.

“Andre Peek has a long history of service to our students and a track record of excellence in business,” McCrory said in a press release Tuesday afternoon. “His understanding of market-based industry needs will make him an invaluable member of North Carolina’s Academic Standards Review Commission.” Read More

News

CommonCore_NC1Senate leader Phil Berger (R-Rockingham) is the first to publicly announce his appointments to a legislative commission that will review and make recommendations for modifying the Common Core State Standards. Berger’s appointments include a retired math professor recommended by the John Locke Foundation and a Winston-Salem/Forsyth school board member who has a “self-guided education in curriculum standards.”

House Speaker Thom Tillis, Governor Pat McCrory, State Board of Education Chair Bill Cobey and Senator Berger each must make appointments to the Academic Standards Review Commission, which has the authority to recommend to the State Board of Education that they replace none, some, or all of the much-debated Common Core standards.

The review commission is required by law to meet before September 1, 2014 — although no meeting has been scheduled as of August 29.

Berger’s spokesperson, Shelly Carver, told N.C. Policy Watch that the Senate leader made his appointments on August 20. They are as follows:

  • Ann Clark, deputy superintendent, Charlotte-Mecklenberg Schools
  • Dr. Laurie McCollum, assistant principal, Western Rockingham Middle School
  • Jeannie Metcalf, member, Winston-Salem/Forsyth Board of Education
  • Dr. John T. Scheick, retired math professor, UNC Chapel Hill, Duke University, The Ohio State University

Dr. Scheick, a retired math professor who lives in North Raleigh, told N.C. Policy Watch by phone that he became interested in the Common Core standards just a few weeks ago, when he read an August 5 Wall Street Journal article by a UC-Berkeley mathematician who skewered the math standards.

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