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MedicaidAs Governor McCrory and his HHS Secretary Aldona Wos convene a rather strange closed door “listening  session” on Medicaid in Greensboro today (it’s scheduled to last all of 45 minutes), let’s hope they both took the time over the weekend to read an excellent, “from-the-trenches” essay by Goldsboro physician Dr. David Tayloe in Raleigh’s News & ObserverIn it, Tayloe explains the importance of preserving and improving North Carolina’s homegrown “medical home” model for delivering Medicaid services (Community Care of North Carolina) rather than falling for the false promises of out-of-state HMO companies that have been trying to muscle their way into the state.

CCNC is rooted in care coordinated by providers, not insurance corporations. By keeping care decisions in the hands of those most qualified to make them, medical home models improve health outcomes for North Carolina’s Medicaid population. Doctors, care managers and pharmacists across provider-led networks share data and best practices to provide efficient and high-quality care to patients, decreasing emergency room visits and reducing wasteful spending.

The CCNC model is the result of decades of work that has consistently generated positive results in North Carolina. An HMO takeover of this system would mean higher administrative costs to the state and billions of taxpayer dollars leaving the state to pay corporate shareholders. Under federal Medicaid rules, the additional money required to pay HMOs can come from only one place – sharp cuts to provider payments. When physicians choose not to participate in Medicaid, patients neglect preventive care and head to the emergency room in crisis, raising state costs while producing less positive health outcomes. Read More

MedicaidThere’s new and compelling evidence that North Carolina’s model for delivering Medicaid (Community Care North Carolina -CCNC) is a winner — notwithstanding the often-bumbling oversight provided by embattled state DHHS Secretary Aldona Wos and the attempt by Senate leaders to sell the program off to a private managed care company. (It’s worth noting that the flawed sell-off idea was once also touted by Gov. McCrory and Sec. Wos as well until the two gradually came to their senses over the past year).

Today, in a letter to state Medicaid directors throughout the country, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services at the national DHHS announced today that they are launching a new national collaborative initiative called the “Medicaid Innovation Accleerator Program.” The goal of initiative is “to improve care and improve health for Medicaid beneficiaries and reduce costs by supporting states in accelerating new payment and service delivery reforms.”

The letter announcing the initiative holds up three examples of state innovation success in Ohio, Washington and North Carolina. Here’s what it has to say about North Carolina: Read More

The folks at Carolina Public Press in Asheville have more responses from the trenches today in a story about the North Carolina Senate’s proposal to privatize Medicaid and do away with the state’s award-winning Community Care NC program:

“Medicaid management nonprofit faces closure

Community Care of North Carolina, a nonprofit with 14 networks across the state — including Western North Carolina — would lose its contract with the state under the Senate’s plan.

The proposed elimination of the nonprofit network is part of the Senate’s plan to remove Medicaid management from the state Department of Health and Human Services and create a new agency to handle the program, as noted in its budget document.

Community Care of Western North Carolina, which has an office in Asheville, serves eight WNC counties: Buncombe, Henderson, Madison, McDowell, Mitchell, Polk, Transylvania and Yancey, according to its website. It serves 64,342 Medicaid enrollees, according to July 2013 figures, with an additional 12,000 enrolled in other programs. Read More

The state’s health agency revealed its proposal yesterday of how to it wants to overhaul the state’s Medicaid system, giving a broad outline that appeased doctor and hospital groups and backed away from earlier promises of a privatized system.

In a meeting held Wednesday for a Medicaid reform advisory group, N.C. Health and Human Services Secretary Aldona Wos and her staff said they would, with the legislature’s blessing, move to a  model using Accountable Care Organizations (which can be groups of medical practices or hospital systems) to manage Medicaid patients physical health needs.

DHHS Sec. Aldona Wos

DHHS Sec. Aldona Wos

“What we are presenting today is a realistic and achievable plan that puts patients first, helps create a sustainable Medicaid program, and builds on what we have in North Carolina,” Wos said, in a press release about Wednesday’s meeting. “This proposal represents a fundamental improvement in how the state delivers Medicaid.”

Wos will present the plan March 17 to lawmakers, any changes will also need federal approval.

(Scroll down or click here to read the two-page handout on the proposal.)

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