Archives

Uncategorized

In case you missed it, a Sunday editorial in the Greensboro News & Record told it like it is when it comes to the matter of corporate taxes in North Carolina. It was entitled “Next to nothing.”

“What’s less than a lower corporate income-tax rate? What some businesses actually pay.

North Carolina legislators cut the state’s corporate income-tax rate last year from 6.9 percent to 6 percent. It’s scheduled to drop to 5 percent next year.

Republican lawmakers said the cut was needed to create a better business climate and make the state more competitive with its neighbors. Yet, cutting the rate to 5 percent isn’t very meaningful to a corporation that pays barely more than 1 percent.

Duke Energy, based in Charlotte, paid an average of 1.3 percent of North Carolina profits in state corporate income tax from 2008 through 2012, according to a study released last week by Citizens for Tax Justice and the Institute for Taxation and Economic Policy. Read More

NC Budget and Tax Center
Greensboro presser

Allan Freyer at Greensboro event

As details continued to emerge throughout the day about a possible short-term Federal budget deal for 2014 and 2015, it became increasingly clear that the deal represents a missed opportunity for a long-term resolution to our nations’ budget challenges and a bad deal for America’s workers. Although completing any deal is a step in the right direction after two years of partisan gridlock and the recent government shutdown, this deal just doesn’t go far enough—it fails to replace a majority of the sequestration spending cuts and does not include any new tax revenue. As a result, this mini deal represents a big missed opportunity.

This was the message sent by a crowd of workers, families, and advocates that gathered in Greensboro this morning for an event calling on their federal elected representatives to finish the job and replace sequestration in its entirety with new revenues raised by closing corporate tax loopholes. Across-the-board sequestration spending cuts are harming North Carolina, advocates said, and without new revenue, North Carolinians will continue to be hit hard by spending cuts to core initiatives like education, job training, and healthcare.

“This emerging deal represents a missed opportunity. Congress has one last opportunity to prevent damaging cuts to investments that help struggling families and a struggling economy,” said Allan Freyer, Policy Analyst with the Budget & Tax Center, a project of the NC Justice Center. “We are calling on North Carolina’s federal lawmakers to do the right thing and support closing corporate tax loopholes so that we can make the investments needed to support North Carolina families and end gridlock on the federal budget.”

Read More

NC Budget and Tax Center

Word on the street in our nation’s capital is that prospects for a short-term budget deal may be brightening for a package that funds the federal government and replaces some or all of the sequestration spending cuts for 2014. As budget negotiators continue to work on some kind of bipartisan deal, a recent opinion survey conducted by Hart Research Associates may have a lot to say about what this still nascent deal looks like—specifically, the overwhelming popularity of raising new revenues by closing corporate tax loopholes.

Here are some of the poll’s most important findings:

  • Americans overwhelmingly support a budget that raises new tax revenues over a plan that relies solely on spending cuts to address our nation’s fiscal challenges.  Specifically, 58 percent support a budget that increases tax revenue from the wealthy and corporations, while only 36 percent support a budget that does not increase taxes on any American—a 22-point advantage for raising new tax revenues.
  • And by significant margins, Americans see closing tax loopholes for profitable corporations as the best way to raise those revenues, especially in contrast to a plan that doesn’t raise any revenues at all.  Specifically, 67 percent of Americans favor a budget that closes corporate tax loopholes and limits tax breaks for the wealthy, and only 28 percent support a budget that does not increase taxes on any American
  • Healthy majorities support replacing at least half of the sequestration spending cuts with new revenues from closing corporate loopholes.  Specifically, 53 percent support reducing the spending cuts by half and replacing them with new tax revenue from the wealthy and corporations, and only 27 percent want the cuts to go fully into effect—a 26 percent advantage for new revenues.

And support for new revenues spikes even higher when it comes to closing the most egregious tax loopholes, like those that promote shipping American jobs overseas or that those allow hedge fund managers to pay lower taxes than middle class families:

Read More

NC Budget and Tax Center

The government shutdown finally ended last week, but the fight for a balanced approach to the federal budget continues. As part of the deal struck last week, Congress agreed to negotiate a comprehensive budget agreement that addresses sequestration and opens the door for new revenues. Perhaps the best potential source of new revenues comes from reining in the special tax loopholes, deductions, and outright giveaways that allow too many corporations to avoid paying their fair share in taxes.

Over the last year, we’ve profiled some of these tax loopholes, along with the corporations that use them to avoid their responsibilities. This month’s issue takes a look at IBM, which earned $45 billion in profits over the past five yeas, and managed to shelter almost $20 billion of those profits in offshore bank accounts to avoid US taxation. As a result, Big Blue managed to lower its actual effective tax rate to 5.8 percent, well below the statutory corporate tax rate of 35 percent.

As long as corporations like IBM are able to avoid paying their taxes, the rest of us will be asked to pick up the tab for addressing our nation’s budget challenges through spending cuts to key investments that grow our economy and protect our most vulnerable.

For more details, see the profile on IBM.

NC Budget and Tax Center

Apple Inc., the computer giant and maker of the iPhone, is notorious for its tax avoidance schemes. Such gimmicks prompted a Congressional Senate subcommittee hearing on the corporation’s practices last May. A little bit of digging by Congressional staffers revealed that Apple channels tens-of-billions of dollars of profit through three entities that have no home country for tax purposes. So, despite the fact that most of Apple’s profits ought to be taxable, it is able to skirt paying its fair of taxes by setting up offshore tax havens.

As I explained earlier today, Apple is able to check out on billions in taxes by simply checking a box on the IRS tax form. The “check the box” rule allows companies to use offshore entities as a front to avoid paying their fair share of taxes. Currently, businesses can defer US tax on payments made from one dummy corporation to another, which effectively makes their passive income invisible for tax purposes. This rule has allowed Apple to avoid US taxes on $44 billion in profits over four years from 2009 to 2012. Read More