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In case you missed it, a Sunday editorial in the Greensboro News & Record told it like it is when it comes to the matter of corporate taxes in North Carolina. It was entitled “Next to nothing.”

“What’s less than a lower corporate income-tax rate? What some businesses actually pay.

North Carolina legislators cut the state’s corporate income-tax rate last year from 6.9 percent to 6 percent. It’s scheduled to drop to 5 percent next year.

Republican lawmakers said the cut was needed to create a better business climate and make the state more competitive with its neighbors. Yet, cutting the rate to 5 percent isn’t very meaningful to a corporation that pays barely more than 1 percent.

Duke Energy, based in Charlotte, paid an average of 1.3 percent of North Carolina profits in state corporate income tax from 2008 through 2012, according to a study released last week by Citizens for Tax Justice and the Institute for Taxation and Economic Policy. Read More

NC Budget and Tax Center

The tax bill signed into law this year is fiscally irresponsible and bad for our state, but lawmakers could improve the situation by repealing part of the corporate income tax cut and paying for the rest by closing ineffective tax breaks that only benefit certain companies.

The corporate income tax cuts in the final tax plan are one of the biggest reasons why the state will have less revenue to invest in our roads, schools, and communities. The tax plan cuts the corporate income tax rate to 5 percent by 2015, from the current rate of 6.9 percent, and will reduce annual tax revenue by around $217.9 million in fiscal year 2014-2015 alone.

Meanwhile, the tax plan does little to rid the state’s tax code of costly and wasteful tax breaks that only help certain corporations or industries. Read More

NC Budget and Tax Center

The tax plan signed by Gov. McCrory includes huge tax cuts for profitable corporations that are unlikely to boost economic growth in the state and will reduce revenue for investment in our public schools, healthcare services for the elderly, and other important public investments.

By 2015, the corporate income tax rate is cut to 5 percent from the current rate of 6.9 percent and will reduce annual tax revenue by around $217.9 million in fiscal year 2014-2015. The corporate income tax rate is cut even further in future years if revenue meets a certain target – which is actually below existing revenue projections – and would reduce annual revenue by more than $423 million. These benefits will flow to less than 10 percent of North Carolina businesses. Read More

NC Budget and Tax Center

When Thanksgiving rolls around, no one wants to watch someone else eat all the turkey and then have to pick up the grocery bill all by themselves. But that’s what’s happening in our nation’s budget debate—highly profitable multinational corporations are using special tax loopholes, credits, deductions, and outright giveaways to avoid paying their fair share of taxes while asking the rest of us to pick up the tab for fixing our nation’s budget challenges through spending cuts to key investments that help grow the economy. Even worse, at a time when many families will be celebrating their Thanksgiving blessings or sharing those blessings with less fortunate friends and neighbors, many in Congress are trying to protect these tax loopholes while simultaneously cutting federal food assistance for hungry families.

That’s why N.C. Policy Watch and the N.C. Budget and Tax Center are continuing to shine a light on corporate tax dodging. In recent years, corporate profits have neared record highs while corporate tax collections are at a 30-year low, so now is the time to raise new revenues, rather than asking hungry families to bear the brunt of addressing our nation’s budget challenges. And an excellent source of new revenues involves the billions of dollars in corporate tax loopholes, deductions, credits, and outright giveaways that allow too many multinational corporations to avoid paying their fair share of taxes. So instead of giving all the turkey to profitable corporations and asking the rest of us to foot the bill, let’s ask these profitable companies to pay their fair share for Thanksgiving dinner.

To underscore this message, N.C. Policy Watch and the N.C. Budget and Tax Center are continuing to profile a number of corporate tax avoiders with strong connections to North Carolina (Click here to read previous profiles of Duke Energy, Merck & Co. and International Paper).

And keeping with the holiday theme of food, this month, we’re focusing on the highly profitable fast food giant Yum! Brands, revealing the following:

  1. the size and scope of their businesses,
  2. the taxes they have avoided paying in recent years, and
  3. the methods they use to accomplish this.

Read More

NC Budget and Tax Center

Word on the street in our nation’s capital is that prospects for a short-term budget deal may be brightening for a package that funds the federal government and replaces some or all of the sequestration spending cuts for 2014. As budget negotiators continue to work on some kind of bipartisan deal, a recent opinion survey conducted by Hart Research Associates may have a lot to say about what this still nascent deal looks like—specifically, the overwhelming popularity of raising new revenues by closing corporate tax loopholes.

Here are some of the poll’s most important findings:

  • Americans overwhelmingly support a budget that raises new tax revenues over a plan that relies solely on spending cuts to address our nation’s fiscal challenges.  Specifically, 58 percent support a budget that increases tax revenue from the wealthy and corporations, while only 36 percent support a budget that does not increase taxes on any American—a 22-point advantage for raising new tax revenues.
  • And by significant margins, Americans see closing tax loopholes for profitable corporations as the best way to raise those revenues, especially in contrast to a plan that doesn’t raise any revenues at all.  Specifically, 67 percent of Americans favor a budget that closes corporate tax loopholes and limits tax breaks for the wealthy, and only 28 percent support a budget that does not increase taxes on any American
  • Healthy majorities support replacing at least half of the sequestration spending cuts with new revenues from closing corporate loopholes.  Specifically, 53 percent support reducing the spending cuts by half and replacing them with new tax revenue from the wealthy and corporations, and only 27 percent want the cuts to go fully into effect—a 26 percent advantage for new revenues.

And support for new revenues spikes even higher when it comes to closing the most egregious tax loopholes, like those that promote shipping American jobs overseas or that those allow hedge fund managers to pay lower taxes than middle class families:

Read More