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N.C. Policy Watch presents the first Crucial Conversation luncheon of 2016:

A conversation with Tom Jensen of Public Policy Polling

Click here to register

With the 2016 election campaign already well underway and early voting for the March 15 North Carolina primary scheduled to commence March 3, this is an excellent time to get fully up to speed on where things stand and what’s likely to happen. Please join us as we discuss these issues and more with one of America’s premier pollsters, Tom Jensen of Raleigh-based Public Policy Polling.

jensen

Tom is the Director of Public Policy Polling and oversees its day to day operations. During his time at PPP he has been a frequent guest for television and radio stations across the region and has been called on for expert analysis by publications including the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, the Christian Science Monitor and U.S. News and World Report. He writes for PPP’s blog and Twitter account in addition to crafting the content for most of its surveys. He is an honors graduate of UNC-Chapel Hill, where he wrote his senior thesis about black candidates for statewide office across the country in the early 21st century.

Don’t miss this very special event!

Click here to register

When: Wednesday, January 27 at noon — Box lunches will be available at 11:45 a.m.

Where: Center for Community Leadership Training Room at the Junior League of Raleigh Building, 711 Hillsborough St. (At the corner of Hillsborough and St. Mary’s streets)

Space is limited – pre-registration required.

Cost: $10, admission includes a box lunch.

Questions?? Contact Rob Schofield at 919-861-2065 or rob@ncpolicywatch.com

Commentary

N.C. Policy Watch presents the first Crucial Conversation luncheon of 2016:

A conversation with Tom Jensen of Public Policy Polling

Click here to register

With the 2016 election campaign already well underway and early voting for the March 15 North Carolina primary scheduled to commence March 3, this is an excellent time to get fully up to speed on where things stand and what’s likely to happen. Please join us as we discuss these issues and more with one of America’s premier pollsters, Tom Jensen of Raleigh-based Public Policy Polling.

jensen

Tom is the Director of Public Policy Polling and oversees its day to day operations. During his time at PPP he has been a frequent guest for television and radio stations across the region and has been called on for expert analysis by publications including the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, the Christian Science Monitor and U.S. News and World Report. He writes for PPP’s blog and Twitter account in addition to crafting the content for most of its surveys. He is an honors graduate of UNC-Chapel Hill, where he wrote his senior thesis about black candidates for statewide office across the country in the early 21st century.

Don’t miss this very special event!

Click here to register

When: Wednesday, January 27 at noon — Box lunches will be available at 11:45 a.m.

Where: Center for Community Leadership Training Room at the Junior League of Raleigh Building, 711 Hillsborough St. (At the corner of Hillsborough and St. Mary’s streets)

Space is limited – pre-registration required.

Cost: $10, admission includes a box lunch.

Questions?? Contact Rob Schofield at 919-861-2065 or rob@ncpolicywatch.co

Commentary

We had a standing room only crowd at yesterday’s excellent Crucial Conversation luncheon: “Immigrants in North Carolina: Where do things stand? Where do we go from here?” For those who couldn’t be in attendance to hear from our experts, Patrick McHugh and Raul Pinto, here is the video of the event:

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Commentary

The best answer to the question in the headline above, of course, is “Let’s fervently hope not.” Unfortunately, recent events indicate that there’s reason for concern. As Professor Julie Weise of the University of Oregon made clear in an excellent column in Raleigh’s News & Observer last week critiquing Governor McCrory’s transformation since his days as Mayor of Charlotte, political opportunism is a pernicious drug for people in public office.

“Though the governor claims he has always supported legal immigration but not illegal, Charlotte’s economy thrived and his career benefited from policies that welcomed immigrant labor whatever its status. Under McCrory’s watch, the Mecklenburg County Sheriff’s Office instituted a policy to check the immigration status of anyone arrested for any reason, but the Charlotte Police Department declined to do so, preferring to retain the trust of the immigrant community – in other words, the very type of ‘sanctuary city’ policy McCrory has just outlawed. The welcome mat was out, the immigrants came with or without papers, and the city flourished economically.

Paradoxically, it was this very economic ‘revitalization’ of Charlotte, bolstered by Latinos, that allowed McCrory to nurture statewide ambition. Setting his sights on North Carolina’s Executive Mansion, McCrory turned his back on Latinos around 2005. That year, he appointed an Immigration Study Commission to provide political cover for his growing ambivalence on the issue, and by 2006 he was openly speaking out against Latino immigration.

Fortunately, there continue to be lots of opportunities for people who want to promote sane and humane policies toward immigrants to learn, educate and speak out. There will be another such event next Wednesday here in Raleigh at the final N.C. Policy Watch Crucial Conversation of the year. Here are the details:

Immigrants in North Carolina: Where do things stand? Where do we go from here?

Featuring Patrick McHugh of the N.C. Budget & Tax Center and Raul Pinto of the N.C. Justice Center’s Immigrant and Refugee Rights Project

Click here to register

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