Commentary

RSVP today for 9/29 luncheon on for-profit colleges

Don’t miss out on our next NC Policy Watch Crucial Conversation luncheon:

For-profit colleges: A helpful solution or part of what ails higher education?

NCPW-CC-2015-09-29-Barmak-Nassirian-edit-400x270-webFeaturing Barmak Nassirian, Director of Federal Relations and Policy Analysis for the American Association of State Colleges and Universities

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The rapid growth of for-profit colleges is one of the most important phenomena to impact American higher education in decades. Spurred by pervasive advertising and recruiting, the spread of online learning and the challenges of the 21st century economy, more and more Americans are turning to for-profit schools in hopes of boosting their employment and income prospects. Some conservative think tanks even argue that for-profit colleges can and should supplant public and nonprofit schools as the chief vehicle for delivering higher education.

Unfortunately, for many students, for-profit colleges have failed to deliver. Indeed, for a sizable number of students, the experience has been similar to what one would expect from a high-cost, predatory lender: slick and deceptive ads, poor service and mountains of debt. As advocates at the North Carolina Justice Center’s Predatory For-Profit Schools Project explain here, the industry is rife with sketchy operators who take advantage of vulnerable consumers.

So, where do things currently stand and where are they going? What is the true nature of the for-profit college industry and what does it portend for public and nonprofit schools? What are federal law and policymakers doing about the issue?

Please join us as we explore these questions and others with Barmak Nassirian. Mr. Nassirian the Director of Federal Relations and Policy Analysis at the American Association of State Colleges and Universities. In this role, he coordinates federal relations and legislative, regulatory, and public policy for AASCU. Nassirian is also a nationally known policy analyst and expert on federal student aid. He has worked for decades with an extensive network of contacts on both sides of the aisle on Capitol Hill, with the Obama Administration and within key federal agencies, as well as with the media and the broader national higher education community.

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When: Tuesday, September 29, at noon — Box lunches will be available at 11:45 a.m.

Where: Center for Community Leadership Training Room at the Junior League of Raleigh Building, 711 Hillsborough St. (At the corner of Hillsborough and St. Mary’s streets)

Click here for parking info.

Space is limited – preregistration required.

Cost: $10, admission includes a box lunch.

Click here to register

Questions?? Contact Rob Schofield at 919-861-2065 or rob@ncpolicywatch.com

Commentary

Today’s big news story is the subject of next week’s Crucial Conversation luncheon

Today’s big top-of-the-fold story in Raleigh’s News & Observer will be the subject of next Tuesday’s N.C. Policy Watch Crucial Conversation luncheon. As the N&O reports:

“Millions of dollars poured into North Carolina political campaigns in recent years in a futile attempt to keep the video sweepstakes industry legal – much of the money at the direction of a man later charged in Florida with racketeering.

The free-wheeling spending on politicians, lawyers and lobbyists has raised suspicions, although one probe, by the state elections board, found no campaign finance violations. Campaign and ethics watchdogs hope state or federal prosecutors will pick up the trail and investigate more deeply.

The elections watchdog group Democracy North Carolina, whose complaint prompted the two-year elections board inquiry, now wants the U.S. attorney and the Wake County district attorney to determine whether laws against corruption, bribery or other offenses were broken, and for authorities to take another look at potential election law violations.”

Come join us next Tuesday as we get the full scoop on this troubling and thus far under-reported story with the watchdog behind it — Bob Hall of Democracy North Carolina:

Bob HallSweepstakes industry corruption: How far does it go? What should be done?
Featuring Bob Hall, Executive Director of Democracy North Carolina

Join us as Hall explains his findings, what Democracy NC is asking prosecutors to do and the overall state of political corruption in North Carolina politics today.

Click here to register

When:Tuesday, August 25, at noon — Box lunches will be available at 11:45 a.m.

Where: Center for Community Leadership Training Room at the Junior League of Raleigh Building, 711 Hillsborough St. (At the corner of Hillsborough and St. Mary’s streets)

Click here for parking info.

Space is limited – preregistration required.

Cost: $10, admission includes a box lunch.

Questions?? Contact Rob Schofield at 919-861-2065 or rob@ncpolicywatch.com

Commentary

Sweepstakes industry corruption and NC politics: How bad is it?

RSVP today for next Tuesday’s Crucial Conversation luncheon:
Sweepstakes industry corruption: How far does it go? What should be done?

Featuring Bob Hall, Executive Director of Democracy North Carolina

Bob Hall, Executive Director of Democracy NC

It’s been almost a decade since the efforts of a determined group of nonprofit watchdogs, led by Democracy North Carolina Executive Director Bob Hall, helped expose the corruption of former North Carolina House Speaker Jim Black. In addition to driving Black from office, those efforts helped spur a number of improvements to state laws governing campaign finance, gifts to public officials, lobbying disclosures and many other important areas.

Now, however, corruption has reared its ugly head again and there are real questions as to whether the existing structure for enforcing state campaign finance laws can respond adequately to the challenge. As detailed in a letter Hall delivered to federal and state prosecutors earlier this month, several of North Carolina’s most important political leaders were the recipients of large and potentially illegal campaign contributions from individuals affiliated with the controversial “sweepstakes” industry in 2011 and 2012. Strangely and surprisingly, however, officials at the State Board of Elections chose not to follow up on Hall’s findings. Now Hall and his colleagues are appealing to the U.S. Attorney and Wake County District Attorney to take a second look.

Join us as Hall explains his findings, what Democracy NC is asking prosecutors to do and the overall state of political corruption in North Carolina politics today.

Click here to register

When: Tuesday, August 25, at noon — Box lunches will be available at 11:45 a.m.

Where: Center for Community Leadership Training Room at the Junior League of Raleigh Building, 711 Hillsborough St. (At the corner of Hillsborough and St. Mary’s streets)

Click here for parking info.

Space is limited – preregistration required.

Cost: $10, admission includes a box lunch.

Click here to register

Questions?? Contact Rob Schofield at 919-861-2065 or rob@ncpolicywatch.com

Commentary

Seats still available for next Monday’s “Caring for caregivers” luncheon

NC Policy Watch presents a Crucial Conversation luncheon —

Caring for Caregivers: The importance of quality wages for ensuring quality care

Click here to register

Like the rest of the nation, North Carolina is quickly aging. Within 35 years, the population over age 65 is projected to more than double. There is a rapidly growing need for direct care to allow community members to continue living with dignity.

Unfortunately, recruiting and retaining skilled people to do this work is increasingly difficult. Though it includes some of the state’s fastest growing occupations, direct-care work offers some of the lowest wages in the state. As a result, too many home-care workers don’t make enough to afford the basics like groceries, rent and transportation — leading to increased turnover of caregivers and disrupted care for seniors.

So what can be done? Are there public policy changes able to address these problems? And how can grassroots activists get involved?

NCPW-CC-2015-07-20-caregivers-rep-yvonne-holley-220x270

Join us as we pose these and other questions to a panel of experts that includes state Rep. Yvonne Holley (pictured left) and Allan Freyer, director of the Workers’ Rights Project of the North Carolina Justice Center, as well as directly impacted community members.

The luncheon will also feature a video of remarks President Obama will deliver at the July 13 White House Conference on Aging.

Don’t miss the opportunity to learn more about this important and timely subject.

When: Monday, July 20, at noon — Box lunches will be available at 11:45 a.m.

Where: The North Carolina Association of Educators Building, 700 Salisbury St., Raleigh, NC 27601

Space is limited – pre-registration required.

Cost: $10, admission includes a box lunch.Thanks to a generous donor, this luncheon is free of charge. Please select the $0.00 event fee on the registration page before checkout.

Click here to register

Questions?? Contact Rob Schofield at 919-861-2065 or rob@ncpolicywatch.com

Commentary

Don’t miss next week’s Crucial Conversation: Caring for Caregivers

Caring for Caregivers: The importance of quality wages for ensuring quality care

Click here to register

Like the rest of the nation, North Carolina is quickly aging. Within 35 years, the population over age 65 is projected to more than double. There is a rapidly growing need for direct care to allow community members to continue living with dignity.

Rep. Yvonne HolleyUnfortunately, recruiting and retaining skilled people to do this work is increasingly difficult. Though it includes some of the state’s fastest growing occupations, direct-care work offers some of the lowest wages in the state. As a result, too many home-care workers don’t make enough to afford the basics like groceries, rent and transportation — leading to increased turnover of caregivers and disrupted care for seniors.

So what can be done? Are there public policy changes able to address these problems? And how can grassroots activists get involved?

Join us as we pose these and other questions to a panel of experts that includes state Rep. Yvonne Holley (pictured left) and Allan Freyer, director of the Workers’ Rights Project of the North Carolina Justice Center, as well as directly impacted community members.

The luncheon will also feature a video of remarks President Obama will deliver at the July 13 White House Conference on Aging.

Don’t miss the opportunity to learn more about this important and timely subject.

When: Monday, July 20, at noon — Box lunches will be available at 11:45 a.m.

Where: The North Carolina Association of Educators Building, 700 Salisbury St., Raleigh, NC 27601

Space is limited – pre-registration required.

Cost: $10, admission includes a box lunch.Thanks to a generous donor, this luncheon is free of charge. Please select the $0.00 event fee on the registration page before checkout.

Click here to register

Questions?? Contact Rob Schofield at 919-861-2065 or rob@ncpolicywatch.com