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Commentary

In case you missed it, one of the weekend’s best editorials appeared in Saturday’s Greensboro News & Record. It blasted the General Assembly’s dreadful 11th hour addition to the already problematic bill to move next year’s primary election to March. A day after Chris Fitzsimon rightfully called the bill “what may be the most shocking piece of legislation passed in this General Assembly,” the N&R put it this way:

“It allows the creation of ‘affiliated party committees’ controlled by the speaker of the House, president pro tem of the Senate or House and Senate minority leaders. Bob Hall of the watchdog group Democracy North Carolina called them slush funds that could raise unlimited amounts of money from corporations or lobbyists, even during legislative sessions.

‘These changes take us backwards. They undercut the reforms adopted after the deal-making scandals involving House Speaker Jim Black a decade ago,’ Hall said in a news release Friday.

He should know. He and his organization initiated the complaints that led to federal corruption charges against Black, the Democratic speaker.

Hall added: ‘They give wealthy special interests new ways to dominate N.C. politics. And they create new ways for legislative leaders to sell access, steer money into their pet causes and exert control over other legislators.’”

The editorial concluded by calling on Gov. McCrory to veto the bill. And given that the measure only squeaked through the House by three votes, perhaps this once he’ll muster the courage. Click here to read the entire editorial.

Commentary

Today’s big top-of-the-fold story in Raleigh’s News & Observer will be the subject of next Tuesday’s N.C. Policy Watch Crucial Conversation luncheon. As the N&O reports:

“Millions of dollars poured into North Carolina political campaigns in recent years in a futile attempt to keep the video sweepstakes industry legal – much of the money at the direction of a man later charged in Florida with racketeering.

The free-wheeling spending on politicians, lawyers and lobbyists has raised suspicions, although one probe, by the state elections board, found no campaign finance violations. Campaign and ethics watchdogs hope state or federal prosecutors will pick up the trail and investigate more deeply.

The elections watchdog group Democracy North Carolina, whose complaint prompted the two-year elections board inquiry, now wants the U.S. attorney and the Wake County district attorney to determine whether laws against corruption, bribery or other offenses were broken, and for authorities to take another look at potential election law violations.”

Come join us next Tuesday as we get the full scoop on this troubling and thus far under-reported story with the watchdog behind it — Bob Hall of Democracy North Carolina:

Bob HallSweepstakes industry corruption: How far does it go? What should be done?
Featuring Bob Hall, Executive Director of Democracy North Carolina

Join us as Hall explains his findings, what Democracy NC is asking prosecutors to do and the overall state of political corruption in North Carolina politics today.

Click here to register

When:Tuesday, August 25, at noon — Box lunches will be available at 11:45 a.m.

Where: Center for Community Leadership Training Room at the Junior League of Raleigh Building, 711 Hillsborough St. (At the corner of Hillsborough and St. Mary’s streets)

Click here for parking info.

Space is limited – preregistration required.

Cost: $10, admission includes a box lunch.

Questions?? Contact Rob Schofield at 919-861-2065 or rob@ncpolicywatch.com

Commentary

RSVP today for next Tuesday’s Crucial Conversation luncheon:
Sweepstakes industry corruption: How far does it go? What should be done?

Featuring Bob Hall, Executive Director of Democracy North Carolina

Bob Hall, Executive Director of Democracy NC

It’s been almost a decade since the efforts of a determined group of nonprofit watchdogs, led by Democracy North Carolina Executive Director Bob Hall, helped expose the corruption of former North Carolina House Speaker Jim Black. In addition to driving Black from office, those efforts helped spur a number of improvements to state laws governing campaign finance, gifts to public officials, lobbying disclosures and many other important areas.

Now, however, corruption has reared its ugly head again and there are real questions as to whether the existing structure for enforcing state campaign finance laws can respond adequately to the challenge. As detailed in a letter Hall delivered to federal and state prosecutors earlier this month, several of North Carolina’s most important political leaders were the recipients of large and potentially illegal campaign contributions from individuals affiliated with the controversial “sweepstakes” industry in 2011 and 2012. Strangely and surprisingly, however, officials at the State Board of Elections chose not to follow up on Hall’s findings. Now Hall and his colleagues are appealing to the U.S. Attorney and Wake County District Attorney to take a second look.

Join us as Hall explains his findings, what Democracy NC is asking prosecutors to do and the overall state of political corruption in North Carolina politics today.

Click here to register

When: Tuesday, August 25, at noon — Box lunches will be available at 11:45 a.m.

Where: Center for Community Leadership Training Room at the Junior League of Raleigh Building, 711 Hillsborough St. (At the corner of Hillsborough and St. Mary’s streets)

Click here for parking info.

Space is limited – preregistration required.

Cost: $10, admission includes a box lunch.

Click here to register

Questions?? Contact Rob Schofield at 919-861-2065 or rob@ncpolicywatch.com

Commentary

NC Policy Watch presents a Crucial Conversation luncheon —

Sweepstakes industry corruption: How far does it go? What should be done?

Click here to register

Featuring Bob Hall, Executive Director of Democracy North Carolina

Bob Hall, Executive Director of Democracy NC

It’s been almost a decade since the efforts of a determined group of nonprofit watchdogs, led by Democracy North Carolina Executive Director Bob Hall, helped expose the corruption of former North Carolina House Speaker Jim Black. In addition to driving Black from office, those efforts helped spur a number of improvements to state laws governing campaign finance, gifts to public officials, lobbying disclosures and many other important areas.

Now, however, corruption has reared its ugly head again and there are real questions as to whether the existing structure for enforcing state campaign finance laws can respond adequately to the challenge. As detailed in a letter Hall delivered to federal and state prosecutors earlier this month, several of North Carolina’s most important political leaders were the recipients of large and potentially illegal campaign contributions from individuals affiliated with the controversial “sweepstakes” industry in 2011 and 2012. Strangely and surprisingly, however, officials at the State Board of Elections chose not to follow up on Hall’s findings. Now Hall and his colleagues are appealing to the U.S. Attorney and Wake County District Attorney to take a second look.

Join us as Hall explains his findings, what Democracy NC is asking prosecutors to do and the overall state of political corruption in North Carolina politics today.

Click here to register

When: Tuesday, August 25, at noon — Box lunches will be available at 11:45 a.m.

Where: Center for Community Leadership Training Room at the Junior League of Raleigh Building, 711 Hillsborough St. (At the corner of Hillsborough and St. Mary’s streets)

Click here for parking info.

Space is limited – preregistration required.

Cost: $10, admission includes a box lunch.

Click here to register

Questions?? Contact Rob Schofield at 919-861-2065 or rob@ncpolicywatch.com

News

Voting rightsThere was a good deal of anecdotal evidence during the November election indicating that something was amiss in a lot voting places around the state. Now, sadly, there is damning confirmation in a new report from the watchdogs at Democracy North Carolina. This is from the report summary:

“New voting restrictions and unprepared poll workers kept as many as 50,000 North Carolinians from voting in this fall’s general election, according to an analysis by the elections watchdog group Democracy North Carolina.

Although most voters reported that casting a ballot was easy and election officials generally responded quickly to fix a broken machine, there is mounting evidence that a shorter early voting period, confusion caused by new election rules, and strong turnout pushed many Election Day polling sites to the breaking point.

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