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The Guv has hinted that he might try saying “no” to at least a couple of the General Assembly’s worst, last-minute absurdities (and it would be an amazing act of lap-dogginess if he doesn’t). So, if he does act, which ones will it be?

Over the weekend, Steve Ford at the N.C. Council of Churches neatly summarized three bills that seem to be at the top of the Governor’s potential “No” list:

“If Gov. Pat McCrory goes along with the General Assembly’s partial “disassembly” of state environmental rules – and if North Carolina loses significant ground in the battle against pollution, as likely would be the case – he won’t be able to say he wasn’t warned.

Fourteen of the state’s environmental groups have teamed up with a request that McCrory veto House Bill 74 – which they describe as a ’68-page compilation of special interest handouts.’ The so-called Regulatory Reform Act of 2013 was approved by the Republican-controlled Senate and House in the closing hours of the legislative session that concluded on July 26, with environmental advocates strongly objecting….”

Read Steve’s entire column by clicking here.

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A group of 14 North Carolina environmental advocacy groups submitted a letter to Governor McCrory yesterday in which they urged him to veto two controversial bills advanced by polluters during the waning hours of the recently adjourned legislative session.

The letter describes the two bills as follows:

“House Bill 74 is a sixty-eight-page compilation of special interest handouts, some of which have already caught your attention. As you noted in your press conference on July 26th, the bill weakens standards that protect citizens, communities and gamelands from the impacts of landfills. Additionally, you pointed out that the bill strips local governments of control over the size and types of billboards that can be erected in a community….

[Senate Bill 515] is the third delay of a much-needed and federally required clean up of Jordan Lake. The rules need a chance to bear results. Once implemented, wastewater plant upgrades and better stormwater management will reduce water pollution in Jordan Lake and the rivers and streams that feed into it. Several local governments have already invested a lot of time and money complying in good faith with the Jordan Lake rules, and Senate Bill 515 punishes them for making those investments. In addition, delaying the rules exposes upstream municipalities and developers to legal challenges for failure to adequately protect a resource that the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has already found to be impaired.”

Click here to read the entire letter as well as new survey results showing that strong public support of most North Carolinians for strong environmental protection laws.

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Xmas presentAs the 2013 legislative session begins to move toward adjournment, it looks like the General Assembly is taking its practice of pulling complex and controversial bills out of thin air and passing them before anyone even has time to respond to the next level. Among today’s examples: a giant new bill to rewrite dozens of state regulations — many dealing with important environmental protections.

Today, the Senate Rules Committee took up House Bill 74. Prior to the meeting, the bill was a modest three-page  proposal entitled “Periodic Review and Expiration of Rules.” After the meeting it was a 56 page monster with scores of separate sections entitled the “Regulatory Reform Act of 2013.” Don’t look for it online though — things are moving so fast the General Assembly website hasn’t even caught up yet. Read More

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Can the U.S. learn lessons from Japan’s economic troubles of the last decade? Yes indeed. Not from a new Washington Post article, though.

The Council on Foreign Relations’ Amity Shlaes argues that Japanese investment in infrastructure offers a cautionary tale for Barack Obama. This is true, but not at all in the way Shlaes alleges. After studying Japan for eight years and living there for a time, I can say that the Post article presents a deeply distorted picture that needs debunking before it spreads.

First, understand this: Though there are common elements to their respective crises, comparing infrastructure policy between the two nations is like comparing burgers to sushi. It’s shortsighted and silly to compare a small, island nation with limited infrastructure capacity – a country whose public transportation system, 15 years ago, was ahead of where we are today – to the vast United States, where we’ve habitually underinvested in community needs.

America is unlikely to run out of areas, urban or rural, in desperate need of upgraded bridges, new bus and rail transit projects, or communities in need of jobs. That’s why Gavan McCormack, a well-respected progressive Japan scholar, is 100 percent correct to rail against Japan’s construction-industrial complex when he’s quoted in the Post article. Because of the construction industry’s huge lobbying influence in Japan, many unnecessary (and ecological harmful) projects were launched.

This is a spot-on criticism of Japan that applies not at all to the United States. I’m certain McCormack would be horrified to learn his work was being cited in the same breath as a Heritage Foundation study, and deployed to argue against public works projects on a different continent.

There are three major lessons we can learn from Japan’s response to their financial crisis:

What was Japan’s biggest mistake? Not acting fast enough. Though the economic problems were rooted in the 1980s bubble and the collapse started in the early 1990s, public sector funds weren’t used to rescue troubled firms until 1996. This allowed the crisis to deepen considerably, which made the road back much tougher.

Among mainstream Japanese economists, this is taken as a given. That’s why their government’s experts are calling America’s quicker response “encouraging.”

Is public investment necessary? Absolutely. Almost all experts agree that the problem wasn’t that Japan spent money on public works: it’s that they failed to do so fast enough and — due to political factors — they didn’t put the money in all the right places.

Is public investment sufficient? Absolutely not. Japan needed, as the U.S. needs, improved regulatory oversight to hold shady dealers accountable and guard against future troubles. Sound regulatory policy could have prevented both crises, and it’ll be necessary to stop future collapses.

Of course Japan made errors, and of course we should learn from those missteps. The keys to getting it right: act fast; invest in the real economy, putting people to work and meeting critical human needs; and resist the deregulatory impulse at every turn.