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Yield: Love conquers everything; let us too, yield to love

This is the third piece in a series of videos by Mimi Schiffman on North Carolina’s Amendment One:

In a small school a little north and a little west of downtown Durham, N.C., a group of eleven-, twelve- and thirteen-year-olds has been busy organizing a field-trip.

Watch as a middle school’s gay-straight alliance, GLOW, for Gay Lesbian or Whatever, embarks on an adventure in civic engagement with real consequences for many of the club’s members.

“They don’t really see kids as having an idea of how they want their future to be like,” said Sarah, a GLOW member, “but when we actually voice our opinion it really does make a difference.”

Production: Mimi Schiffman
Music: Phil Cook & His Feat
Additional Camera: Patrick Mustain and Vanessa Patchett

Special thanks to:
Lisa Joyner
Carolina Friends School
Phil Cook

Mimi Schiffman is a photographer, videographer and multimedia producer pursuing a master’s degree at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. This work is a part of a documentary project she is producing on marriage equality for her thesis. The work is being released in the lead-up to the 2012 North Carolina primaries where voters are asked to decide on a constitutional amendment which could render many established same-gender couples and their families legal strangers in the eyes of the law.

Mimi’s work is being posted on Huffington Post.

Yield: Love conquers everything; let us too, yield to love

This is the second in a series of videos by Mimi Schiffman:

Meet North Carolina family: Kim, Kathy, Ben, Jamie and Justin, and listen as they put into words what’s at stake behind North Carolina’s proposed Amendment One.

“I mean, you can term it whatever you want,” said Kathy Sullivan. “But you really cannot look at these relationships and determine they are anything but family.”

The proposed constitutional amendment, which reads: “Marriage between one man and one woman is the only domestic legal union that shall be valid or recognized in this state,” could potentially invalidate adoptions by same-gender parents across the state.

Production: Mimi Schiffman
Music: “Viandanze,” Fabrizio Paterlini

Mimi Schiffman is a photographer, videographer and multimedia producer pursuing a master’s degree at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. This work is a part of a documentary project she is producing on marriage equality for her thesis. The work is being released in the lead-up to the 2012 North Carolina primaries where voters will be asked to decide on a constitutional amendment which could render many established same-gender couples and their families legal strangers in the eyes of the law.

Mimi’s work is being posted on Huffington Post.

“Going Forward” was filmed in Fuquay-Varina, NC.

Yield: Love conquers everything; let us too, yield to love

Contributed by Mimi Schiffman:

Twelve-year-old Isak Atkins-Pearcy loves Legos, doughnuts and fighting for what he believes in.

“I think in a world where everything is right, you could love anyone you wanted to.”

He’s been fighting alongside his parents and with his junior high GSA to defeat North Carolina’s proposed constitutional amendment which will be decided in the May 8th primary.

Amendment One would place in the constitution the following language: “Marriage between one man and one woman is the only domestic legal union that shall be valid or recognized in this state.”

Meet Isak, and hear a fresh perspective on relationships from a young man, full of conviction and love for his family.

Production: Mimi Schiffman
Music: “April,” Marcel Pequel
Artistic Direction: Isak Atkins-Pearcy

Mimi Schiffman is a photographer, videographer and multimedia producer pursuing a master’s degree at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. This work is a part of a documentary project she is producing on marriage equality for her thesis. The work is being released in the lead-up to the 2012 North Carolina primaries where voters will be asked to decide on a constitutional amendment which could render many established same-gender couples and their families legal strangers in the eyes of the law.

Mimi’s work is being posted on Huffington Post.

“Love = Love” was filmed in Durham, NC.

Uncategorized

Harvery Gantt and Richard Vinroot aren’t the only Charlotte mayors who think Amendment One is a bad idea. Current Charlotte Mayor Anthony Foxx tells N.C. Policy Watch that business leaders in his city believe the anti-gay marriage amendment  will undercut North Carolina’s competitiveness.

Foxx says the May 8th ballot initiative only serves to throw the state into a “culture war” running counter to the main pledge that many N.C. legislators ran on – creating new jobs.

“If you imagine companies, like some of the largest companies we have not only in Charlotte but in Raleigh, you know they have a diverse array of people who work for them. And if our message to those companies is don’t bother sending us your diverse workforce,  they’re going to go someplace else,” explained Foxx.

To hear a portion of Mayor Foxx’s interview with Chris Fitzsimon, click below. To hear the full radio interview –  including our interviews last week with U.S. Senator Kay Hagan and N.C. State Chancellor Randy Woodson –  visit the Radio Interview section of the N.C. Policy Watch website:

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Uncategorized

The jobs crisis in North Carolina seems to be getting more dire by the day. North Carolina’s unemployment rate is hovering above 10 percent and the jobs deficit —  the difference between the number of jobs North Carolina has and the number it needs to regain it’s pre-recession employment rate —  stands at over 490,000. Competition of available jobs is extremely high in this economic climate, with unemployed workers outnumbering available jobs by almost 5 to 1.

What could make this bad situation even worse? Recent reports and news articles have been shining a spotlight on hiring practices that discriminate against unemployed job-seekers. Reviews of job listings have shown that employers and staffing firms have been posting ads that include exclusions based on employment status, with many of the ads stating that applicants “must be currently employed.”

Not only is this practice unfair, it can be devastating for unemployed job-seekers and their families. Moreover, eliminating employment opportunities keeps talent and skills out of the labor pool and flies in the face of equal opportunity. The American public agrees and lawmakers are responding. According a recent poll on the issue, 90 percent of respondents stated that the refusal to consider unemployed job applicants was unfair.

The American Jobs Act provides a provision that would make it unlawful to refuse to hire applicants solely because they are unemployed or to post a job ad stating that unemployed persons will not be considered. Unemployed workers, and especially the long-term unemployed, need assistance in returning to work. This provision is an important step in giving the unemployed an equal chance.