Archives

Commentary

Tony Tata 2In case you missed it, this morning’s lead editorial in Raleigh’s News & Observer rightfully tells the state’s $136,000 per year Transportation Secretary, Tony Tata, to start focusing on his job and ditch the Obama bashing on Fox News with Sean Hannity.

Here’s the excellent conclusion:

“Why Hannity is turning to Tata for wisdom on the Middle East is baffling. Tata has no special insight into the region. Beyond that, the public learned all it needed to know about Tata’s judgment of military leadership when he publicly declared that Sarah Palin would be a better commander-in-chief than Barack Obama.

Beyond why Hannity would seek Tata’s opinion is the question of why Tata would choose to give it. For a former general, this seems a basic strategic mistake. More than a quarter of North Carolina’s transportation funding comes from the federal government. A state transportation secretary who makes it a practice to go on TV and blast the president for, among other things, endangering the nation, probably is not improving his state’s chances of receiving discretionary federal funding.

Adie Tomer, an associate fellow at Brookings Institute who studies infrastructure funding, said most federal transportation funding is automatic and beyond politics. But there are grants worth many millions of dollars for which states compete. A good relationship with the current administration can help a state gain a winning edge. North Carolina enjoys an edge with former Charlotte Mayor Anthony Foxx serving as the U.S. Secretary of Transportation, but that edge may be dulled by Tata’s abrasiveness.

‘It’s a political town,’ Tomer said of Washington, even in agencies that are not directly political. He added that Tata’s criticism of the administration seems contrary to North Carolina’s requests for funding. ‘I just don’t see what there is to gain from it, especially because it’s not his current job,’ Tomer said. ‘Is that looking out for the best interests of North Carolina? It doesn’t sound like it.’

Apparently Tata’s sees his livelihood as being both a secretary of transportation and a retired general. He’s North Carolina’s own Secretary General.”

 

News

A state Senator who previously chaired the N.C. State Port Authority wants to make contracts the state port authority enters into with carriers a secret.

If passed, the bill would carve out an exemption to the state public records law for “usage” contracts the state port enters into with carriers. The contracts generally detail the costs paid to the state for docking, handling cargo, storage and other services.

NCPorts

Photo from N.C. Ports Authority

Senate Bill 194 was introduced by state Sen. Michael Lee, a freshman Republican from Wilmington, and has been referred to the Senate Rules Committee.

Lee, who chaired the State Ports Authority before joining the legislature, did not return a phone call seeking comment.

North Carolina’s public records law defines nearly all the documents, emails, and contracts that public agencies enter into as belonging to the public, and available for public inspection upon request. There are exceptions to the law, and records used by law enforcement for criminal investigations, personnel files, personally identifying information like social security numbers and plans for economic development are frequently not disclosed.

The publicly owned and operated State Port Authority is under the state transportation department, and overseen by an 11-member board. It operates deep water operations in Morehead City and Wilmington, and inland ports in Charlotte and Greensboro, according to a 2013 audit of the port.

A private marina in Southport that the state owns was recently put up for sale by the port authority, according to the Wilmington Star-News.

The N.C. State Ports Authority did not initiate a request for the pending bill about public record exemptions, said Cliff Pyron, a spokesman for the state-owned port.

But keeping the information secret would be beneficial , he said.

“It’s just needed for competitive reasons,” Pyron said.

Other ports on the Eastern seaboard exempt that information from the public record laws, Pyron said, referencing to a recent study conducted for the State Port Authority. Pyron said he did not know what specific states shield that information.

N.C. Policy Watch asked Wednesday for a copy of that report under the state public records law, but it was not immediately made available.

Pyron also indicated that, if the bill passes, the public could access other information at the state port – just not the contracts the state enters into with carriers.

“This is only a very small section of our contracts and only ones that deal with specific ports services,” Pyron wrote in an email. “The overwhelming majority of our contracts—including construction, purchasing, consulting services, etc.-will remain available to the public.”

Commentary

Tony Tata 2Don’t despair if you’ve missed out thus far on seeing North Carolina’s Secretary of Fiction/Transportation, A.J. “Crush the Enemy” Tata at one of his numerous appearances to plug his new novel.

It turns out that North Carolina’s $136,000 per year cabinet secretary has been and will be squeezing several more events into his schedule in recent and coming days, including a talk today at the Locke Foundation’s “Shaftsbury Society” luncheon.

Here is is his recent and upcoming book signing schedule from his website AJTata.com:

Chicago, IL – Pritzker Military Library – Feb. 24
Quantico, VA – Quantico base exchange – Feb.27
Arlington, VA – Henderson Hall base exchange – Feb. 28
Fayetteville, NC – Airborne and Special Operations Museum – March 7
Fayetteville, NC – Barnes & Noble – March 7
Raleigh, NC – Quail Ridge Books & Music – March 8
Raleigh, NC – John Locke Foundation – March 9
Jacksonville, NC – Camp LeJeune base exchange – March 13
Havelock, NC – Cherry Point base exchange – March 14
Virginia Beach, VA-Barnes & Noble – March 21
Commentary

ITony Tata 2t is increasingly clear that a) North Carolina Transportation Secretary Tony Tata is a part-time Secretary who receives full-time pay ($136,000 per year) and b) Gov. Pat McCrory doesn’t give a darn.

How else to explain the Secretary’s ongoing second and third jobs as a novelist and Fox News Commentator on military issues and the silent acquiescence from the mansion?

Today — a day on which large swaths of the state are paralyzed by an unexpected snowstorm, thousands of public employees can’t get to work and numerous Department of Transportation crews are, presumably, working feverishly to clear our roads — the DOT Secretary will be…speaking in Chicago at Pritzker Military Museum & Library to plug his new “thriller” novel.

We’re not making this up. A call to the Pritzker Museum a few minutes ago confirmed  that Tata’s talk for this evening (800 miles from home) is on.

Meanwhile, Gov. Pat McCrory plods cheerfully along — content, apparently, to let one of his most important department heads mail it in and play the role of prima donna media figure on the public dime.

One can only imagine the wild bleats and gesticulations that would have emanated from Right Wing Avenue had a Perdue administration official somehow produced a book on, say, child rearing or healthful living while in office and then gone on Oprah to plug it. When it comes to Tata, however, the only thing one hears from those erstwhile crusaders against government waste, fraud and abuse is the sound of crickets chirping.

Commentary

Tony Tata 2One would have to think that some state officials are having second thoughts this morning about laying off 500 or so Department of Transportation employees as the state Senate proposed last week. As one look out the window will remind all of us, these are the kinds of days on which it’s hard to have too many dedicated public employees keeping our highways and byways clear and drivers safe.

That said, one must wonder just how engaged state Transportation Secretary Tony Tata is in the discussion of the issue. Last night, as the brunt of the winter storm was blasting North Carolina, the Secretary was right where you’d expect him to be: plugging his latest novel and offering foreign policy advice on Fox News. He (or his publicist — it’s never clear who is on the account at any time) was even tweeting about it last night while DOT road crews were out there risking life and limb for their fellow citizens.

The bottom line: Let’s hope North Carolina’s DOT workers all have a productive and safe day out there today serving their fellow citizens. And if state leaders are really serious about doing away with redundant and/or less productive employees in the giant department, they might do well take a close look at one particular employee who is taking home $136,000 in taxpayer bucks each year even as his attention is frequently focused on matters quite unrelated to his job.