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Falling Behind in NC

If you work hard and play by the rules, you deserve a chance to get ahead. This is why the Earned Income Tax Credit was invented: to help families with low-paying jobs make ends meet.

Unfortunately, North Carolina is the first state in 30 years to eliminate its Earned Income Tax Credit. This move abandoned a bunch of our neighbors, people with stories like Kara’s:

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There is no more stark illustration of why tax policy matters. With NC job growth coming primarily in low-wage industries, we’re going to need the Earned Income Tax Credit — and other measures that work for working people — more than ever.

 

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Pat McCrory 4Maybe it’s the ongoing game of musical chairs in Gov. Pat McCrory’s communications staff or maybe it’s just the man himself, but whatever it is, the Governor’s public pronouncements continue to be peppered with admissions and allegations that bespeak a remarkable degree of obliviousness to the facts and the implications of his administration’s policies.

Yesterday morning’s announcement on raising teacher pay for new teachers featured a classic example. As the Governor began his remarks on his proposal and attempted to lay out the groundwork for it, he made the following rather amazing (and, one has to note, grammatically-challenged) admission:

“Today sadly, the starting teacher pay in North Carolina makes only $30,800. You know, that’s not even enough to raise a family or to pay off student loans, which this new generation of teachers are having to borrow money to go to college at this point in time. How do we expect someone to pay back that loan at that starting salary?”

While the Guv deserves an “attaboy” for making such a statement (yes, teachers make too little and government should do something about it!) he deserves nothing but a big “what the heck?!” for the stunning hypocrisy and lack of awareness it shows with respect to so many of his other policies. Read More

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New from the numbers wonks at the Budget and Tax Center:

Allowing the state Earned Income Tax Credit to expire would harm veterans, active-duty military, a new analysis finds

RALEIGH (July 2, 2013) – About 64,000 veteran and active-duty military families in North Carolina would be impacted by current tax plans, all of which allow the state’s Earned Income Tax Credit to expire. New analysis by the Washington, D.C.-based Center on Budget and Policy Priorities and state-level analysis by the Budget & Tax Center found that tens of thousands of military families in North Carolina would be affected.

The Senate tax plan (HB 998, Fifth edition) being debated later today allows the state Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) to expire, increasing the tax load on tens of thousands of low-income soldiers, veterans, and their families while the wealthiest taxpayers and profitable corporations get a tax break. Read More

NC Budget and Tax Center

There are reports that the state Senate and House leadership is working on a compromise tax plan—with the catch, of course, being that many North Carolinians will likely not view the final tax plan as much of compromise, especially in light of how it will probably treat low- and moderate-income taxpayers.

In order to truly be fair to low- and moderate-income taxpayers, the upside-down nature of the state’s tax code must be addressed. But, as our analysis shows, leadership is pursuing tax plans that ignore this principle of equity. They’re also ignoring the important role that the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) plays and confusing how the EITC matches up against the standard deduction and a zero tax bracket.

You may recall that at the beginning of session, legislators chose to reduce the state’s EITC—which is a modest but vital support for nearly 907,000 workers earning low wages—and to axe the credit at the end of the 2013 tax year. Read More

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Alexandra Sirota, Director of the North Carolina Budget and Tax Center and the state’s leading independent tax policy expert issued the following brief statement this morning after the House Finance Committee debated and approved legislation to overhaul North Carolina’s tax code:

“This tax plan will provide the wealthiest North Carolinians a tax cut while middle-class and low-income taxpayers pay more.

The only amendment accepted makes things worse — adding $525 million to the price tag and bringing the revenue loss each year to nearly a $1 billion.  Without this vital revenue, North Carolina can’t  make needed investments in our economy, our children’s education, the health of our seniors and the safety of our communities.”  

Click here for a fact sheet with more information on the legislation (HB 998).