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Kannapolis City Schools reports that they had to eliminate 20 positions for 2013-14 thanks to reductions in state spending on education.

Ellen Boyd, KCS’ director for community relations, reported the following cuts to NC Policy Watch:

  • We eliminated 20 positions due to cuts in state funding. The positions are specified below. Only one person lost a job due to the reductions. We absorbed the other cuts through attrition and transferring personnel among our schools. However, as you can see, the cuts are significant and affect the school and classroom levels.
    • 7 regular classroom teacher positions
    • 5 EC teaching positions
    • 1 ESL teaching position
    • 2 Literacy Coach positions
    • 1 Math Coach position
    • 1 Spanish teacher position
    • 2 Teacher Assistant positions
    • 1 Health & Wellness Coordinator position
  • We cut $244,815 from our supply budget (72% of the supply budget)
  • We closed our Alternative Program location to save $125,000. Our alternative program is now operating inside of our high school instead of having its own separate site.

Click here to see our growing list of school districts that have been forced to make difficult cuts for the 2013-14 school year thanks to reductions in state-level education spending.

Craven County lawmakers Rep. Michale Speciale and Sen. Normal Sanderson held a session with more than 75 teachers at New Bern-Craven County Public Library on Monday night, according to the Sun Journal.

Teachers hurled questions at the lawmakers about their actions on teacher pay, vouchers, class size and many other issues that Sanderson and Speciale supported during the 2013 legislative session.

“My purpose for being here is to answer your questions,” said Speciale, but “I don’t want to get into a debate. This is about our trying to hold ourselves accountable.”

Speciale told teachers that the General Assembly did not cut education spending but that they actually spent $400,000 more when you “consider that previous allocations came with the expectation that 40 cents on the dollar be returned to the state.”

Also from the Sun Journal:

Asked about eliminating the $3,500 annual stipend for a teacher getting a master’s degree, Speciale said he had been shown studies that masters’ degrees and class size had little to do with teaching success.

That first got laughter, requests to see the studies, testimonials about how much both matter, and the comment from one teacher that she had spent her own time and $40,000 in tuition from her own money and will miss the cutoff for any payback by two weeks.

Speciale said he had been told that the average teacher makes $54,000, which also brought laughter and a comment from one teacher that she has been a teacher for 27 years and doesn’t make $54,000.

Read the full story here.

trackingCuts-web-600New Hanover County Schools lost state funds for 54 teachers and 22 teacher assistants, according to CFO Mary Hazel Small.

The school system was able to keep these positions for 2013-14 by using local funds, but they will all be eliminated next year through attrition.

New Hanover County Schools joins a growing list of school districts that have been forced to make difficult cuts for the 2013-14 school year thanks to reductions in state-level education spending.

trackingCuts-web-600Wilkes County Schools reports that they have had to cut eight teaching positions, seven teacher assistant positions, three media assistants and 1.5 central office positions.

Wilkes’ Superintendent Dr. Marty Hemric told the Wilkes Journal-Patriot that thanks to state budget cuts over the past five years, the school district has lost of over 100 school positions, including 51 teacher assistants (from 126 in 2008-09 to 75 now), 35 certified teachers (from 484 ½ in 2008-09 to 449.25 now), 15½ central office administrative positions and three media assistants.

Even more positions would have been lost since 2008 if the Wilkes school system hadn’t been able to use federal funds provided through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (also known as stimulus funding) and the Race To The Top initiative to compensate for cuts in state and local funding.

Wilkes County Schools joins a growing list of school districts that have been forced to make difficult cuts for the 2013-14 school year thanks to reductions in state-level education spending.

trackingCuts-web-600Add Vance County Schools to the list — they’ve had to cut eight teaching positions and 12 teacher assistant positions for 2013-14.

Terri Hedrick, Public Information Officer for VCS, reports:

  • Cut teaching positions by eight positions
  • Cut teacher assistant positions by 12 positions
  • No layoffs have occurred; through attrition the teacher assistants have been placed in other positions; we simply did not fill eight vacant teaching positions
  • We were cut $572,643 in state funds for teaching positions
  • We were cut $468,134 in state funds for teacher assistant positions
  • We were cut $105,212 in state funds for instructional support positions (placed in other positions, i.e., assistant principals/lead teachers)
  • We were cut $32,395 in state funds for classroom materials
  • Our total state budget cuts from last year to the new school year totaled $333,257

Check out our growing list of school districts that have been forced to make difficult cuts for the 2013-14 school year.