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Yea! Fred Smith is apparently making a comeback! As you may or may not recall, Smith is a former state Senator who gave up his seat to run (unsuccessfully) in the Republican gubernatorial primary in 2008.  Now, he’s apparently planning to challenge incumbent state Senator Buck Newton next spring in the GOP primary. (Newton is a personal injury lawyer whose law firm website featured a rather strange promotional video). 

In one of the true highlights of the 2008 campaign, Read More

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Thousands of Wake County voters sent a strong message Tuesday night by dismissing the principal architect of a two-year effort to dismantle the county’s much-acclaimed school integration program. With 20 of 20 precincts reporting, Board of Education Chair Ron Margiotta trailed challenger Susan Evans by a margin of 7,100 (52.10%) to 6,515 (47.81%) in his western Wake County district.

At this point, the near-term future of the Board appears to hinge on the election in School Board District 3, where Kevin Hill and Heather Losurdo seem headed for a November runoff. Hill, who generally opposed Margiotta’s efforts, appears to have fallen just short of the 50% needed to win outright.    

Though voter turnout was light, it was nearly double that of two years ago when ideological conservatives swept several school board seats.

 

Raleigh residents vote tomorrow, October 11, on bonds for affordable housing and transportation. At a time when Raleigh residents continue to pay higher rent prices amidst dwindling incomes, seniors find it more and more difficult to stay in safe homes, and the state faces a deteriorating infrastructure problem, voters have an opportunity to support programs that lead to better long-term economic growth. Moreover, record-low interest rates and high unemployment make now an especially cost-effective time to borrow and invest in the city of Raleigh. Read More

With a little over a month until the mid-term elections, many are predicting a blow-out win for Republicans on the state and national level.

Hunter Bacot, director of the Elon University poll, says their latest numbers show Democrats in a difficult position with many likely voters blaming President Obama and the party in power for the duration of the recession and their own economic hardships.

But on the state level, Bacot notes that voters aren’t rushing to support Republicans either. When asked which party they would support this November in the North Carolina state House races, 34% said Democrats, 29% said Republicans, with more than 30% undecided. For the state Senate elections, the numbers were almost identical.

Bacot joins us this week on News & Views to discuss the mood of North Carolina voters, the tea party movement, and how today’s undecided voters will determine which party has the power after November 2nd. For a preview of Hunter Bacot’s radio interview with Chris Fitzsimon, please click below:

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New numbers released Tuesday by Public Policy Polling show North Carolina’s U.S. Senate race is far from decided. Senator Richard Burr leads Elaine Marshall 38% to 33%, but 20% of the voters questioned remain undecided.

Many voters have yet to form an opinion on either of the candidates. Twenty-eight percent of North Carolina voters are unsure of their opinion of Senator Burr and 58% are unsure of Marshall.

While Burr enjoys the security of  a strong Republican base, North Carolinians think he is less visible than former Senator Elizabeth Dole.

“We are four months out from the election and with a fifth of voters undecided, it is
anyone’s game at this point,” said Dean Debnam, President of Public Policy Polling. “Both candidates, especially Marshall need to increase visibility and energize voters to
ensure their victory.”

The poll, which  surveyed 502 North Carolina voters, also finds freshman Senator Kay Hagan struggling to connect with her constituents. Just 33% of voters approve of Senator Hagan, 41 disapprove and 26 are unsure.

The poll’s margin of error is +/- 4.4%.