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voteThe three guest speakers who joined Chris Fitzsimon at today’s NC Policy Watch Crucial Conversation luncheon delivered mostly optimistic messages about the long-term electoral prospects for progressives in North Carolina in the years ahead. For a variety of reasons — history, voter attitudes on the issues, improved organizational structures to name a few — Tom Jensen, Carol Teal, and Dan Blue III remain quite positive about the future. (We’ll post a video of the event in the coming days.)

That said, there’s no denying that there were some troubling and discouraging developments on November 4 — both in the elections results themselves and in the frustrating apathy of many potential voters who might have participated. In this vein, a regular NC Policy Watch contributor, Prof. Charles Beem of UNC Pembroke, recently authored the following election post mortem that is decidedly less optimistic.

Troubling takeaways from the election
By Dr. Charles Beem

There are a lot of disturbing takeaways from the recent election results. For progressives, Thom Tillis’ narrow victory and the stronger-than-ever, gerrymandered majorities in the General Assembly and the state’s congressional delegations were enough to make one feel as if the energetic Moral Monday protests and organizing efforts of the past couple of years have produced precious little effect.

Perhaps even sadder is the fact that it is clear today that a critical mass of citizens simply do not seem to care who gets elected to public office, while a highly motivated minority, whose hatred of President Obama defies a rational explanation, are the tail wagging the dog of contemporary America.

The day after the election I made the mistake of asking the eighteen students in my World Civilizations class how many of them voted last Tuesday. The answer was none, even though (or perhaps because, in part) North Carolina’s voter repression law had severely circumscribed their ability to vote.

Scary, right? What is even more chilling is that earlier in the semester this same class read the book “How the Irish Saved Civilization,” in which author Thomas Cahill persuasively attributed the fall of the Roman Empire (an empire plagued by structural decay, grave economic disparity between rich and poor, and barbarians at the gates — sound familiar?), to the fact that the Roman people ultimately did not care enough to intervene. Instead, they allowed the affluent to drive their civilization into the ground simply for their own short term economic benefit. Sad to say, not a single student made the critical connection between the lessons of history and their own reality as American citizens. Read More

Commentary

Tickets are going fast for two upcoming NC Policy Watch events that you won’t want to miss.

First is next week’s election post mortem Crucial Conversation: “What happened? Why? What now?” featuring Chris Fitzsimon, Dan Blue III, Tom Jensen and Carol Teal. Here are the details:

When: Wednesday, November 19, at noon — Box lunches will be available at 11:45 a.m.
Where: The North Carolina Association of Educators Building, 700 S. Salisbury St., Raleigh, NC 27601
Cost: $10, admission includes a box lunch.
Click here to register and learn more.

Second is our NC Policy Watch 10th anniversary celebration, which is co-sponsored by North Carolina State Senator Dan Blue, Capitol Broadcasting CEO Jim Goodmon and former Gov. Jim Hunt. Come hear from three of North Carolina’s most important leaders as our state comes to a crossroads after four years of damaging cuts to education and rolling back of progress it took a generation to make.

When: Monday, December 8, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Where: The Stockroom in downtown Raleigh.
(Click here for location information).
Commentary

Tickets are going fast for two upcoming NC Policy Watch events that you won’t want to miss.

First is next week’s election post mortem Crucial Conversation: “What happened? Why? What now?” featuring Chris Fitzsimon, Dan Blue III, Tom Jensen and Carol Teal. Here are the details:

When: Wednesday, November 19, at noon — Box lunches will be available at 11:45 a.m.
Where: The North Carolina Association of Educators Building, 700 S. Salisbury St., Raleigh, NC 27601
Cost: $10, admission includes a box lunch.
Click here to register and learn more.

Second is our NC Policy Watch 10th anniversary celebration, which is co-sponsored by North Carolina State Senator Dan Blue, Capitol Broadcasting CEO Jim Goodmon and former Gov. Jim Hunt. Come hear from three of North Carolina’s most important leaders as our state comes to a crossroads after four years of damaging cuts to education and rolling back of progress it took a generation to make.

When: Monday, December 8, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Where: The Stockroom in downtown Raleigh.
(Click here for location information).
Commentary

The powerful combination of history, an inexhaustible money machine and shameless gerrymandering produced impressive electoral victories for the Right in this week’s election, but it also remains a powerful truth that when you actually ask voters directly for their opinions on core pocketbook issues, they continue to favor progressive solutions.

You’ve probably already heard about the overwhelming success of several minimum wage hike proposals around the country, but here’s another striking example in which even red state voters voted overwhelmingly for the progressive position: Medicaid expansion in Wisconsin.

On Tuesday, the Badger state held an advisory referendum in which voters in 19 counties and one mid-size city were asked whether the state should expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act.

The vote: Yes – 73%, No-27%.

Now, mind you, the referendum wasn’t just conducted in a few liberal bastions. Read More

Commentary
Kay Hagan concession

Photo: WRAL.com

Last night’s election results were a sobering and at times confounding experience for progressives. It’s always traumatic and frustrating to see millions of people vote directly against their own economic interests in so many races.

That said, one thing that clearly isn’t at all confounding in 2014 is this: the pernicious and cancerous spread of big, dark money and the urgent need to combat it at all costs. This isn’t about the Tillis-Hagan result, or even the Republican takeover of the U.S. Senate that had been foreseen for weeks. Hagan and most of the other defeated Democrats had plenty of their own dark, corporate money as well.

Indeed, Kay Hagan’s Senate term was always a byproduct/side effect of other, larger forces rather than who she was or what she “stood” for. Hagan surfed into office in 2008 on the Obama wave (and Elizabeth Dole’s comical blunders) and exited the stage last night on the ebbing tide that almost always comes for the party in power during the last off-year election of a two-term presidency. Hagan probably could have spent another $20 million and still lost.

Moreover, had she won,there is little doubt that she would have continued to do the bidding of the big money forces who plucked her from obscurity originally and funded her campaigns. Read More