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Tuesday’s presidential town hall debate at Hofstra University brings with it some added pressure for President Obama. After a lackluster performance in the first debate October 3rd, Obama finds himself now trailing in some key battleground states.

The latest numbers from Public Policy Polling show Mitt Romney with a two-point lead (49-47) over Obama in North Carolina, helped largely by white voters and independents.

Public Policy Polling Director Tom Jensen notes that Obama still has his customary lead with women at 50-46. But the latest poll shows that’s getting drowned out by the 53-43 one Romney has with men.

Jensen joined us over the weekend on News & Views to discuss the presidential race as well as the gubernatorial contest and NC Council of State races.

To hear an excerpt of his interview with Chris Fitzsimon, click below. To hear the full segment, visit the Radio Interview section of the NC Policy Watch website:

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Good government guru Bob Hall at Democracy NC reports that early voting sites for all of North Carolina’s 100 counties are now posted on State Board of Elections site.

You can visit the Board at www.ncsbe.gov  or go directly to  http://www.ncsbe.gov/GetDocument.aspx?id=2562 to view the sites. You can also view them on a map by going to https://batchgeo.com/map/NCEarlyVoteSites.

Early voting (aka “one-stop absentee” voting) for the November 6 election starts October 18.   

 

 

 

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As people here in North Carolina are scrambling getting ready for the DNC in Charlotte, down in Florida the GOP are starting their convention, already delayed by Isaac.

For those interested, here is a round-up of what all you can find on TV coverage.

YouTube has also put together this really cool page for politics that presumably will cover both conventions and the rest of the election season this year: YouTube Politics.

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Adam Sotak of Democracy NC and Rob Richie of FairVote have a compelling op-ed that’s been running in multiple places around the state. The piece explains:

a) Why North Carolina needs to ditch its lame primary runoff system (a system that, once again, turned out only a tiny fragment of the electorate yesterday), and b) What it would take to make instant runoff voting work better than past experiments. It’s definitely worth a read. Here’s an excerpt:

“North Carolina has had several IRV elections, and three exit polls show voters overwhelmingly preferred it to returning to the polls for a runoff. Unfortunately, the state’s voting equipment currently requires “workarounds” that delay the count. Once North Carolina has optical scan equipment like others have, it would have an IRV tally to share on election night along with other results.

IRV has several advantages: Read More