There are several contenders this week for most egregious recent example of conservative hypocrisy when it comes to the role and value of government.

There’harry browns the phenomenon of ultra-conservative lawmakers from rural areas (like state Senate Majority Leader Harry Brown) who deride government day after day and then, suddenly, when faced with a debate over divvying up state sales tax revenue, turn passionate about the critical role that public investments play in supporting the economy and growth.

And then there’s the spectacle of longtime anti-government ideologues like Raleigh’s Paul Coble who never met a public program they didn’t want to slash being only too happy to swap their private industry lobbying gigs for six-figure government jobs.Paul Coble

For my money, though, this week’s most aggravating example comes once more from the office of Gov. Pat McCrory. Gov. McCrory, as  you will recall, has been helping to deny decent and affordable health care to hundreds of thousands of struggling North Carolinians for almost three years now by refusing to expand Medicaid under the terms of the Affordable Care Act.

His oft-statPat McCrory 4ed excuse: the supposed unreliability of federal money and desire not to grow the size of a supposedly broken government program. Add to this his absurd refusal to acknowledge the huge stimulus impact that adding billions in federal dollars would have on the state economy and you’ve got a complete, far right, market fundamentalist case of denial.

Now, contrast all of this with McCrory’s big announcement yesterday touting the huge, beneficial impact of federal spending on the military in North Carolina. Here’s the lead from the press release:

“The military supports 578,000 jobs in North Carolina and more than two thirds of those jobs are in the private sector, demonstrating the impact of the military ripples across the state’s economy and not just concentrated near military installations. Those are the key findings of a new report released today by the North Carolina Military Affairs Commission and the North Carolina Department of Commerce.”

You got that? The same administration which has devoted years to blasting the idea of federal dollars helping the economy and spurring growth by supporting loads of good jobs in the health care industry is…wait for it…celebrating the idea of federal dollars helping the economy and spurring growth by supporting loads of mostly so-so jobs in the U.S. military. Read More


Thom Tillis 2The Fayetteville Observer has an interesting story today that seems to indicate that Senator Thom Tillis has brought a bit of his special brand of “that was then, this is now” governance to Washington.

According to the Observer, Tillis is speaking out vigorously against proposals to close the Air Force’s 440th Airlift Wing. While this kind of turf protection is probably to be expected from any politician, two things are rather striking about the story:

#1 – Tillis speaks out strongly in the story against federal “sequestration” cuts — i.e. the spending cuts that his fellow conservatives imposed on all kinds of essential public services and the country at-large a few years back. “Sequestration is a great threat to our readiness, to our capabilities,” the Senator said.

And wasn’t it Tillis who forever lectured us during his tenure as State House Speaker about the vast quantity of waste, fraud and abuse in government and how we needed to slash public spending to create jobs? Now, apparently, he sees the wisdom of public spending to create jobs.

#2 – Tillis went to Washington promising to help end the gridlock in Congress. But according to the story, the senator has announced that he will place a “hold” on all civilian appointments within the Department of Defense and the Department of the Air Force until he “get some answers” as to why the Air Force is closing the wing. Guess this goes to show that there is “that was then” gridlock and “this is now” gridlock.

NC Budget and Tax Center

It turns out government spending is the problem with the economy—there’s been too little of it over the last few months, according to Wednesday’s report from the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA).  

Gross domestic product (GDP) dropped by 0.1 percent during the 4th quarter of 2012, the first GDP contraction in three years. While this would ordinarily seem an ominous sign for the health of the nation’s economic recovery, most economists and market-watchers have argued that the contraction is temporary and likely the result of government policy, rather than signs of a long-term downturn.   

Specifically, the fourth quarter contraction is due to sharp reductions in government spending on national defense contracts coupled with a $40 billion drop in business inventories resulting from the same policy environment.

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