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Thom Tillis 2The Fayetteville Observer has an interesting story today that seems to indicate that Senator Thom Tillis has brought a bit of his special brand of “that was then, this is now” governance to Washington.

According to the Observer, Tillis is speaking out vigorously against proposals to close the Air Force’s 440th Airlift Wing. While this kind of turf protection is probably to be expected from any politician, two things are rather striking about the story:

#1 – Tillis speaks out strongly in the story against federal “sequestration” cuts — i.e. the spending cuts that his fellow conservatives imposed on all kinds of essential public services and the country at-large a few years back. “Sequestration is a great threat to our readiness, to our capabilities,” the Senator said.

And wasn’t it Tillis who forever lectured us during his tenure as State House Speaker about the vast quantity of waste, fraud and abuse in government and how we needed to slash public spending to create jobs? Now, apparently, he sees the wisdom of public spending to create jobs.

#2 – Tillis went to Washington promising to help end the gridlock in Congress. But according to the story, the senator has announced that he will place a “hold” on all civilian appointments within the Department of Defense and the Department of the Air Force until he “get some answers” as to why the Air Force is closing the wing. Guess this goes to show that there is “that was then” gridlock and “this is now” gridlock.

NC Budget and Tax Center

It turns out government spending is the problem with the economy—there’s been too little of it over the last few months, according to Wednesday’s report from the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA).  

Gross domestic product (GDP) dropped by 0.1 percent during the 4th quarter of 2012, the first GDP contraction in three years. While this would ordinarily seem an ominous sign for the health of the nation’s economic recovery, most economists and market-watchers have argued that the contraction is temporary and likely the result of government policy, rather than signs of a long-term downturn.   

Specifically, the fourth quarter contraction is due to sharp reductions in government spending on national defense contracts coupled with a $40 billion drop in business inventories resulting from the same policy environment.

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