Archives

Pat McCrory 4Art popeAldona WosMore “you can’t make this stuff up” statements from the McCrory administration today — this time about the impact of the federal government shut-down on poor people in need of assistance.

At a made-for-the-media event at a food bank in Charlotte that also featured State Budget Director Art Pope and DHHS Secretary Aldona Wos, the Guv made a big show of his concern for the poor by publicly releasing a whopping $750,000 to food banks. McCrory also made this remarkable statement: Read More

HungerMore bad news in this new release from the N.C. Justice Center:

“1,708,000 people in North Carolina will see a cut in their food assistance benefits this fall, when a temporary boost to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly known as food stamps) is set to expire, according to new data released by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) discussed in a new report from the Washington, DC-based Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.

All of the more than 47 million Americans including 22 million children who receive SNAP, known as Food and Nutrition Services in North Carolina, will see their food assistance reduced when a modest boost in benefits to SNAP recipients that policymakers included in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) to strengthen the economy and ease hardship expires on October 31.

For a family of three, that cut will mean a reduction of $29 a month— $319 for the remaining 11 months of the fiscal year. This is a serious loss for families whose benefits, after this cut, will average less than $1.40 per person per meal. Read More

The United States Department of Agriculture released a new report today showing that 17.1 percent of households in North Carolina are experiencing food insecurity. The food insecurity rate for North Carolina is 2.4 percentage points above the national average. With this new data, policymakers should be reluctant to create barriers to food assistance and instead focus on job creation. Last November, research  by the Budget and Tax Center showed that the Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program (SNAP)—previously known as food stamps—stemmed the negative effects of unemployment for more than one million North Carolinians over the last several years. Although SNAP is funded by the federal government, the state of North Carolina and its 100 counties play a crucial role in supporting anti-hunger programs for the more than 636,000 households facing food insecurity in North Carolina.