Commentary

Rev. Barber kicks off “revival tour” with successful event at Raleigh synagogue

Revival tourIf there’s a most hopeful and encouraging thing about the new brand of 21st Century “fusion politics” championed by Rev. William Barber of the North Carolina NAACP, it’s the way this man and the movement he leads are truly serious about being an always evolving and progressing, multi-racial, multi-ethnic and multi-faith effort.

The inspiring diversity of the “Forward Together Moral Movement” was on full display again last night at Raleigh’s Temple Beth Or synagogue as a large and diverse crowd in the hundreds gathered to help kick off a national “revival tour” that Barber and several other faith leaders from around the country have launched.

Last night’s event, which came on the heels of a similar one the day before at New York City’s Riverside Church, is part of a tour that will take Barber and his friends and allies into dozens of states around the country this spring and summer as they spread the word of what Barber calls “the Third Reconstruction.”

This is from the “Repairers of the Breach” website that has been constructed to support the effort:

“Repairers of the Breach, Inc. is a nonpartisan and ecumenical organization that seeks to build a progressive agenda rooted in a moral framework to counter the ultra-conservative constructs that try to dominate the public square. Repairers will help frame public policies which are not constrained or confined by the narrow tenets of neo-conservatism. Repairers will bring together clergy and lay people from different faith traditions, with people without a spiritual practice but who share the moral principles at the heart of the great moral teachings. Repairers will expand a ‘school of prophets’ who can broadly spread the vision of a nation that is just and loving.”

As is usually the case at events led by Barber, a Disciples of Christ minister, there were plenty of the trappings of the modern African-American church evident in the program — from the loud and joyful music to the testimonies offered by various speakers to the length (nearly three hours) of the event.

Still, however, as Barber also makes sure in the events he leads, there were plenty of efforts to make everyone feel welcome and a part of the movement — from the setting itself and the enthusiastic welcome of Rabbi Lucy Dinner to the inclusion of leaders from various faith traditions to the frequent references and statements of welcome directed to non-believers.

If there was symbol of how far the Moral Movement has come and how naturally and effectively is has become entwined with (and become a spearhead for) the progressive cause, however, Read more

Commentary

The fight against contingent labor is a civil rights struggle, too

Winsotn-Salem teach-inThe demonstration against the North Carolina legislature’s voter suppression law, organized by the NAACP and Moral Monday movement last Monday in Winston-Salem, was a stirring reminder that, fifty years after the Voting Rights Act, civil rights cannot be taken for granted in this country. But the organizers of the day’s event also called attention to another disturbing trend, one that is closely connected to civil rights: the war on poor people, particularly those who find themselves in the most precarious jobs of our economy’s service sector.

A teach-in on economic justice, facilitated by the NAACP, was held on Monday afternoon at Goler Memorial AME Zion Church. Ben Wilkins of Raise Up for 15 launched the discussion by emphasizing that voter suppression laws are aimed not only at minorities, but at poor people.

To emphasize this point, Wilkins quoted Dr. Martin Luther King’s speech of March 25, 1965, in which Dr. King observed that “segregation of the races was really a political stratagem employed by the emerging Bourbon interests in the South to keep the southern masses divided and southern labor the cheapest in the land…[T]he southern aristocracy took the world and gave the poor white man Jim Crow. … And when his wrinkled stomach cried out for the food that his empty pockets could not provide, he ate Jim Crow, a psychological bird that told him that no matter how bad off he was, at least he was a white man, better than the black man.” Read more

Commentary

Moral Mondays-Forward Together movement returns to Raleigh

The Moral Mondays-Forward Together movement returns to Raleigh today to to blow a little fresh air onto the increasingly wacky goings on in the Legislative Building. In case you missed it, this is “Crossover Week”at the General Assembly and, unfortunately, the deadline has helped give rise to a spasm of new, far right proposals on everything from the death penalty to the spread of guns to, we’re not making this up, teaching K-12 students the wonders of “a strong national defense” and the gold standard.

Click here for the details on this afternoon’s protest. And here’s Rev. William Barber, leader of the state NAACP on what this afternoon’s protests are all about:

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Commentary

What the Right just doesn’t get about the Moral Marches

Moral MarchIn an apparent effort to provide air “both sides” of the issue, Raleigh’s News & Observer posted two essays side-by-side this morning on its editorial page — one extolling the growing movement for justice in North Carolina by Rev. Barber of the North Carolina NAACP and the other an editorial criticizing it from the Lenoir News-Topic.

Setting aside for a moment the fact that this is kind of like matching LeBron James (Barber) against a high school player (the News-Topic) in a game of one-on-one, the two essays are helpful in illustrating a critical fact about the leaders of the modern Right: They just don’t get it.

According to the defenders of Jones Street at the News-Topic:

“[The protests] are pointless…because the scope of the so-called injustices being highlighted are both limited, failing to rouse outrage in general public, and easily addressed by democratic means.”

Is that so? Skyrocketing inequality and suffering (and even hunger) in the world’s wealthiest nation is a “so-called injustice”? And it can be “easily addressed”?If this is so, why have both of these problems been ignored and allowed to get dramatically worse for decades under the leadership of both political parties?

Sorry guys. It’s not that simple. The list of critically important issues held up by the Forward Together movement and given voice by Rev. Barber are a lot more than just a handful of grievances that can be fixed with a bill or two (or even an election or two). Indeed, they highlight some fundamental flaws that have emerged in our democracy that will take decades to repair — if we’re lucky. Bringing real justice to our economy is a lot different than fixing a list of broken streetlights.

It’s understandable that some folks on the Right find Barber and the movement he helps lead annoying and that they wish it would go away. Unfortunately, for them, that just ain’t gonna happen.

Commentary

One month till moral marchers return to Raleigh

Valentine’s Day 2015, February 14, will be especially memorable this year. This is from the good fols at the NAACP and HKonJ coalition:

On this Valentine’s Day, bring your sweetheart to Raleigh and JOIN THE LARGEST LOVE AND JUSTICE MOVEMENT SINCE SELMA!

We will show our LOVE for JUSTICE! We LOVE justice in Education; We LOVE Economic Sustainability, We LOVE Workers and Workers’ Rights and Livable Wages; We LOVE Health Care For All, Medicaid Expansion: We LOVE our Environment; We LOVE Equal Protection Under the Law, without regard to creed, race, gender, gender identity or sexual orientation; We LOVE Voting Rights For All; We LOVE criminal justice.

We LOVE the most vulnerable within our State and Nation; We LOVE the power and beauty of diversity within our State and Nation; We LOVE our neighbors; WE ARE IN THIS LOVE TOGETHER! And We are determined to go “FORWARD TOGETHER, NOT ONE STEP BACK!”

On February 14, 2015, we will gather at 9:00 a.m. in downtown Raleigh. The march will begin at 10:00 a.m. after which we will begin the mass people’s assembly on the doorstep of the State Capitol. Read more