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There he goes again. Just weeks after having dished out a heaping helping of red meat to Islamophobes and other nativists during a dreary three-and-a-half minute appearance with the Fox News prince of darkness, Bill O’Reilly, Gov. Pat McCrory is once more swimming in the murky Fox waters and misleading people about refugees.

This week it was a little lower down the  food chain with Fox Business talking head Neil Cavuto (indeed, the Guv was back to skipping the necktie he felt compelled to don for O’Reilly) but the basic shtick was the same:  Syrian refugees – dangerous and scary; Obama negligent and uncaring as whether he deposits terrorists into North Carolina; Pat McCrory – tough and vigilant (despite having absolutely no authority to do anything or any real knowledge as to any genuine risk on the ground).

The Guv, in an apparent effort to boost his approval rating on the fearful fringe, also declined an opportunity to criticize presidential candidate Donald Trump. Here’s the exchange:

Cavuto: “You know Governor, tomorrow I’ll be talking to Donald Trump on this issue. He’s taken it to the next level by saying we should go slow on allowing more Muslims into the country until we sort all of this out. How do you feel about that?”

McCrory: “I think you determine it by the country and the origin of the area that they’re coming from and my biggest concern is coming from those countries in which there’s basic a civil war going on at this point in time and where ISIS is very, very strong and where it’s impossible to do a background check.”

Translation: “I’m not courageous enough to criticize Trump directly as I don’t want to alienate his supporters or look overly two-faced (after all, he was a featured speaker at the last two state GOP conventions that I helped headline), but I also know I can’t get away with attacking all Muslims, so I’ll just mumble some gibberish about ISIS and civil wars and hope people don’t see the complete illogic given that escaping civil war is one of the signature characteristics of being a ‘refugee.'”

The bottom line: Expect to see more of this. McCrory seems to be intent on appearing “tough on immigration” and the issue is perfect for a politician given his utter lack of authority and responsibility on the matter and the vast number of right-wing media platforms looking to fill airtime.

Click below to watch McCrory and here to see the kind of caring and thinking action that a real leader ought to take.
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Commentary

McCrory_budget305-aGovernor Pat McCrory expressed a tough stance regarding immigration enforcement during a recent segment of Fox News’ The O’Reilly Factor (see Rob Schofield’s post below). Unfortunately, the Governor’s lack of understanding about how immigration enforcement actually works further muddies the waters for law enforcement in North Carolina, is confusing in light of his previous statements and sends precisely the wrong message at this important time in history.

To be clear, McCrory was talking to O’Reilly about the infamous HB 318, which prohibits local governments from adopting policies that bar or discourage their police agencies from gathering information about a person’s immigration status. Gov. McCrory stated there were five such jurisdictions in the state without mentioning, or possibly even knowing, that the policies in those cities were already rendered largely obsolete by the activation of the federal government’s “Secure Communities” program throughout the state, which required the sharing of fingerprints between the local law enforcement agency and immigration enforcement. The so-called sanctuary policies that existed before passage of HB 318 did little to protect those arrested (due to operation of Secure Communities), but they did a lot to foster trust with victims and witnesses of crime.

McCrory also claimed that the law will “unleash the handcuffs” from police officers who want to enforce the law. This is wrong. McCrory’s own interpretation of the new law released just last month stated that it “does not require law enforcement to collect” information about immigration status. What’s more, as Chief Lopez of the Durham Police Department has explained with respect to his own city, this law could actually hurt policing. McCrory’s mixed signals about the law’s execution seem likely to abet this process by helping to erode the trust needed between immigrant communities and the police.

In taking a strong stance against immigration, McCrory also sought to highlight the need for “teamwork” in public safety. But in any team, people play different positions. Just ask Carolina Panthers defensive star Luke Kuechly if he could or should try to take Cam Newton’s place at quarterback. It would make no more sense than it would for the SBI to start issuing parking citations.

The federal government’s message has always been consistent: immigration enforcement is a federal responsibility and such enforcement takes into consideration government resources, national security, and international relations. McCrory voiced a grudging understanding of the limited role of the state when it comes to the Syrian refugee crisis, yet he seems to ignore this obvious dichotomy when it comes to already immigrants living in our state.

Ultimately, McCrory’s various statements regarding North Carolina’s new law leave us with at least three negative takeaways:

First, by sending mixed signals, he make it difficult for people to decipher what the law does.

Second, he clearly signed a law that hurts law enforcement rather than helping it.

Third and most troubling, his rhetoric abandons who we are as a nation, straying from our moral duty to help those escaping persecution and poverty. Immigrants, regardless of status, contribute to the fabric of our communities and the state. History will judge the strength and character of our nation by how we treat those in need, and in time, McCrory’s abandonment of our core values will be deemed an epic fail.

[Editor’s note: Raul Pinto is a staff attorney in the Immigrant and Refugee Rights project at the North Carolina Justice Center.]

News

An essay penned by a freshman at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill claiming a course at one of North Carolina’s flagship schools cast a favorable light on the perpetrators of the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attack has gone viral in the last week.

The freshman journalism student, Alec Dent, claimed in his essay published on the conservative news site College Fix that readings for the optional freshman seminar course “present terrorists in a sympathetic light and American political leaders as greedy, war hungry and corrupt.”

Problem is, as he told WRAL earlier this week, he didn’t actually take the class or read the listed materials.

UNC offers more than 80 seminar courses to its students but “Literature of 9/11” struck a chord with Dent. The course claims to explore a diverse number of themes related to the September 11 attacks, but for Dent it was not diverse enough.

“The class reading list is what first stuck out to me because it really got me thinking, is this a fair and balanced way of looking at the situation,” Dent said.

The freshman journalism major said that he looked at the reading list as well as the class syllabus before writing a piece for an online student publication called “The College Fix.”

Dent admits that he has not taken the class, nor has he read any of the books on the list, but he still felt the course was too one-sided.

“The more research I did into it, the more it seemed like the readings were sympathetic towards terrorism.”

A student who did do the reading and did take the class took issue with Dent’s description, saying that he enjoyed the class taught by Prof. Neel Ahuja, an associate professor in English at UNC, and found it was balanced.

Since Dent’s review was posted a week ago, it’s gone viral in conservative websites and media outlets, with outrage abounding.

Media Matters took a look at a Fox News segment, which had the header “Required Reading: UNC class sympathizes with 9/11 terrorists” and pointed out that the readings were not required, nor were they pushing a single point of view.

“In addition, the full list of assigned readings for the course does in fact contain diverse literature representing the perspectives of Arab-Americans, residents of New York City, members of the U.S. military and their families, survivors of the attacks, non-partisan terrorism researchers, artists, historians, musicians, and the international Muslim community, as well as several texts aimed to honor or memorialize victims of the attacks,” the Media Matters piece states.

Watch the Fox News segment for yourself below.

Commentary

Tony Tata 2In case you missed it, this morning’s lead editorial in Raleigh’s News & Observer rightfully tells the state’s $136,000 per year Transportation Secretary, Tony Tata, to start focusing on his job and ditch the Obama bashing on Fox News with Sean Hannity.

Here’s the excellent conclusion:

“Why Hannity is turning to Tata for wisdom on the Middle East is baffling. Tata has no special insight into the region. Beyond that, the public learned all it needed to know about Tata’s judgment of military leadership when he publicly declared that Sarah Palin would be a better commander-in-chief than Barack Obama.

Beyond why Hannity would seek Tata’s opinion is the question of why Tata would choose to give it. For a former general, this seems a basic strategic mistake. More than a quarter of North Carolina’s transportation funding comes from the federal government. A state transportation secretary who makes it a practice to go on TV and blast the president for, among other things, endangering the nation, probably is not improving his state’s chances of receiving discretionary federal funding.

Adie Tomer, an associate fellow at Brookings Institute who studies infrastructure funding, said most federal transportation funding is automatic and beyond politics. But there are grants worth many millions of dollars for which states compete. A good relationship with the current administration can help a state gain a winning edge. North Carolina enjoys an edge with former Charlotte Mayor Anthony Foxx serving as the U.S. Secretary of Transportation, but that edge may be dulled by Tata’s abrasiveness.

‘It’s a political town,’ Tomer said of Washington, even in agencies that are not directly political. He added that Tata’s criticism of the administration seems contrary to North Carolina’s requests for funding. ‘I just don’t see what there is to gain from it, especially because it’s not his current job,’ Tomer said. ‘Is that looking out for the best interests of North Carolina? It doesn’t sound like it.’

Apparently Tata’s sees his livelihood as being both a secretary of transportation and a retired general. He’s North Carolina’s own Secretary General.”

 

Commentary

Tony Tata 2How does the leader of one of the nation’s largest transportation departments with 14,000 employees and a $4 billion budget find the time to be a prolific author of “thriller” novels and a regular military policy commentator for national media outlets? Are North Carolinians receiving adequate loyalty and dedication to the job for the $136,000 per year they pay him?

Today’s Weekly Briefing explores these questions.

Click here to check it out.