NC Budget and Tax Center

Not so fast, more proposed tax changes that affect state budget

The budget passed by state lawmakers last week expanded the sales tax base to include additional services that are not currently taxed. Accordingly, the repair or upkeep of a vehicle, the repair of a broken washer or dryer, or the maintenance of an air conditioning unit will now be subject to the sales tax.

It appears that the weekend gave policymakers time for some second thoughts about their plan, however. This week, state lawmakers are now aiming to pass a bill that will roll back one particular aspect of the sales tax base expansion included in the budget.

House Bill 117 (HB 117) includes a provision that would exempt repair, maintenance, and installation services on tangible property and motor vehicles covered under manufacturer or dealer warranties from the sales tax. Accordingly, under HB 117, if your vehicle or tangible property is covered under a warranty then you don’t pay a sales tax on repair and upkeep services. To the contrary, if your vehicle or other tangible property is not covered under a manufacturer or dealer warranty then you will pay more in sales taxes.

This tax change means that two people can own similar tangible property, but one could potentially end up paying more in sales taxes simply because they don’t have a manufacturer or dealer warranty. This is troubling because it is likely to particularly harm low-income taxpayers who already pay a larger share of their income in taxes compared to the well-off. Low-income taxpayers who have to take their non-warranted vehicle to an auto shop for an unexpected repair will pay more in sales taxes, for example. Meanwhile, those who are able to afford costly warranties will escape having to pay more in sales taxes.

The backtracking on services included in the sales tax base expansion contradicts state lawmakers’ supposed commitment to base broadening on principle. Broadening the sales tax base has been sold as a way to make the state’s tax code more effective and ensure that it reflects a more service-oriented economy. That appears to be the case only if powerful lobbyists don’t object. Read more

NC Budget and Tax Center

With state’s economy at stake, lawmakers shouldn’t pursue more tax cuts

After enacting huge, costly income tax cuts in recent years that largely benefited the state’s wealthiest people and biggest, most profitable corporations, pursuing more tax cuts would threaten North Carolina’s economy – and yet it appears state lawmakers are doing just that.

Questions remain about what will or won’t be in the budget the Legislature passes. What is known, though, is that the spending target agreed upon by the House and Senate is $230 million less than what the state is projected to take in over the year from tax revenue.

If that turns out to mean a tax-cut proposal, it will come in the face of strong evidence that such a strategy doesn’t deliver widespread economic benefits.  North Carolina is experiencing a very uneven economic recovery. Many people still can’t find jobs and many who are working are being paid less than what it takes to make ends meet. Tax cuts aren’t going to create the jobs North Carolina needs and they take resources away from what the state should invest in to promote real growth – quality public schools, affordable higher education, modern infrastructure, and safe and healthy communities, for example.

A continued pursuit of failed trickle-down economics policies would occur as investments in those public services and others are still below pre-recession levels and insufficient to meet growing needs.

State lawmakers are pursuing two paths to usher in more income tax cuts.

One path builds more tax cuts into the state budget. Budgets passed by both the House and the Senate lower the corporate income tax rate to 3 percent from 5 percent over the next two years. These tax cuts will result in more than $450 million less available to the state for public services over the next two years. As we’ve highlighted previously, cutting corporate income taxes won’t boost North Carolina’s economy; taxes are but a fraction of a business’s costs. Furthermore, the Senate’s budget changes how corporations apportion their income for state income tax purposes and reduces the corporate franchise tax rate. In total, tax changes included in the Senate’s budget would result in nearly $1 billion in less state revenue over the next two years.

The second path, Senate Bill 607, would amend the state constitution to arbitrarily cap the state income tax rate at 5 percent. This would reduce annual state revenue for public investments by around $1.5 billion. The result would mean more erosion of vital services and probably other tax increases – most likely the state sales tax. In combination with other proposed changes to the state constitution, this path would hamstring state lawmakers in the years ahead from meeting the priorities of North Carolinians by restricting the overall level of investment in our public schools, public colleges and universities, and other important areas.

These two paths that state lawmakers are pursuing are troublesome, particularly at a time when investing in North Carolina’s future is important to the state’s economic prospects. Consequently, the continued pursuit of trickle-down economics fails to promote broadly shared prosperity and prevents the entire state from moving forward together.

NC Budget and Tax Center

Hardworking low-wage North Carolinians take it on the chin once again

State lawmakers once again turned their back on hardworking North Carolinians who struggle to support themselves and their families with low wages.

Yesterday, just before the House Finance Committee was scheduled to debate an economic development bill, House Bill 89, the sponsor stripped out a provision that would have reinstated the state Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), a tax break that helps thousands of North Carolinians who work at low-wage jobs. North Carolina’s EITC expired at the end of 2013 when state lawmakers failed to extend it, and this economic development bill would have been the perfect opportunity to bring it back.

The EITC is widely recognized as one of the most effective anti-poverty tools nationwide, especially for children. Nearly 907,000 North Carolinians claimed the state EITC for tax year 2012, benefiting nearly 1.2 million children and providing a $108 million economic boost to local communities across the state.

Slide1

The bill sponsor, Rep. Moore, informed House Finance Committee members that the state EITC provision was excluded from the revised bill in order to increase the chances of the bill gaining bipartisan support among state lawmakers. Read more

NC Budget and Tax Center

Despite growing revenue shortfall, state lawmakers pursue more tax cuts for corporations

State lawmakers have introduced House Bill 117 (HB 117) that pushes for more tax cuts that benefit corporations, even as the state faces an ongoing revenue shortfall resulting from the tax plan passed in 2013.

State lawmakers would like to change an arcane tax provision that determines the amount of state income taxes paid by corporations. The state’s current tax system uses a formula that considers a corporation’s property, payroll, and sales in North Carolina. However, the tax change – referred to as single sales factor (SSF) apportionment formula – would only consider the sales component for certain corporations.

Proponents of this tax change claim that it will boost capital investment in the state and create more jobs. However, as BTC has highlighted before, this claim is not supported by real-world evidence. What will happen, however, is a further reduction in revenue available for public investments and services that businesses depend and rely on.

Here’s a quick recap on why North Carolina should not shift to a SSF apportionment formula: Read more

NC Budget and Tax Center

The tax shift continues

State lawmakers are targeting cash-strapped homeowners as they continue to pursue tax changes that would shift even more of the tax load to low- and middle-income taxpayers, while preserving tax benefits that have largely flowed to the wealthy and profitable corporations.

Legislation approved by the state Senate (Senate Bill 20) would require homeowners to pay state income tax on mortgage debt forgiven by lenders. Meanwhile, financial institutions that provide such consumer relief are allowed to deduct the expense as a tax write-off.

The proposal would undermine a key element of North Carolina’s recovery from the nationwide housing crisis that fueled the Great Recession. In the wake of the crisis, a number of financial institutions  agreed to  settlements that provide consumers relief for unaffordable mortgages. This often meant reducing the amount of principal debt they owed on their mortgages to make them more affordable and lessen the likelihood of foreclosure. Furthermore, the 49-state National Mortgage Settlement encourages mortgage servicers to provide such relief to distressed borrowers affected by the housing crisis.

The goal of these settlements is to ensure that homeowners who were preyed upon by unethical lenders do not fall into the financial tailspin that foreclosure often creates. The tax change proposed by the Senate would require cash-strapped homeowners who have already suffered from the disastrous housing crisis and economic downturn to report this debt forgiveness as income, even though no actual cash is provided to the homeowners.

This could deter families from accepting bank offers to modify their mortgage loans because they cannot afford to pay taxes on the amount of relief they get. Distressed homeowners seeking to stabilize their finances and rebuild in the wake of the housing crisis would face a major setback. Read more