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Pat McCrory 2It’s good to know that while things are going to hell in a handbasket during the busiest time of the year in the state capital, North Carolina’s fearless leader will be right in the mix doing what he almost always does on Friday — scheduling “official” events in Charlotte so that he can spend the weekend in his actual home. Today — and we’re not making this up — it’s a doggie photo shoot.

Here is the Guv’s official schedule for today: Read More

Last October Gov. McCrory caused a stir, and raised some eyebrows, when he said that the state may be forced to expand Medicaid due to a “new” regulation.

The policy to which he was referring is called presumptive eligibility. Presumptive eligibility allows states to give permission to hospitals and other providers to temporarily enroll certain people in Medicaid. North Carolina, for example, allows presumptive eligibility for pregnant women. That means if a hospital does an initial check and it looks like a pregnant woman is likely to qualify for Medicaid then the hospital can temporarily enroll her and get paid for the services it provides. Meanwhile, an application for full Medicaid can be processed without a disruption in care.

This policy is critical for ensuring that patients get care and providers get paid.

In states with efficient systems that can process Medicaid eligibility in real time, this temporary measure is not as important. In states where parents are having to ration medicine for their children due to a backlog in processing Medicaid applications, presumptive eligibility is a critical tool.

Health reform gave hospitals more latitude to presumptively enroll patients, even if the state has not granted the hospital permission to participate in the program. Other providers, notably Community Health Centers, however, are still not able to use presumptive eligibility to enroll children in Medicaid. The Community Health Centers are still limited to enrolling pregnant women.

Ultimately, the state needs to fix its computer system. In the meantime, we need to get care to children. We could start by granting Community Health Centers, and possibly other providers, the ability to temporarily enroll likely eligible kids in Medicaid while DHHS clears its application bottle neck.

And until the state expands Medicaid to all low-income people we will need every splint and bandage we can find to patch our broken system.

 

 

At a Tuesday morning roundtable sponsored by Dell, Intel and the N.C. Business Committee for Education, Gov. Pat McCrory spoke to educators and business leaders who were gathered at the N.C. Department of Public Instruction to strategize about ways to improve teacher effectiveness and next generation learning.

Using the opportunity to reiterate his education goals for the upcoming legislative session, which include paying all teachers more, McCrory hammered home his idea to create a “career pathway plan.”

“We want to ensure teachers have a career…and not a temporary stopover,” said McCrory, explaining that currently teachers have no way to move up in their profession unless they move into higher-paying administrative roles – a career move that not all practitioners are interested in making.

In addition to proposing a two percent average pay increase for all teachers and paying beginning teachers even more, McCrory proposed last week to create a long-term plan that would entice more teachers to stay in the profession by seeing salary increases that are linked to their work as teachers.

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Pat McCrory 4Dan ForestWith yesterday’s mostly predictable election out of the way, state policy debates will actually take center stage in North Carolina for a few weeks. Not surprisingly though, the process will begin today with a rather strange pair of competing press conferences in which the ideological battles that played out in the Republican Party primary between the far right and the ultra-far-right will be renewed. As WRAL.com reported last night:

“Gov. Pat McCrory said Tuesday that he plans to roll out a ‘major education announcement’ in Greensboro on Wednesday that will address long-term issues and focus on rewarding teachers for good work….

The governor plans to join educators, state and local officials and business leaders at North Carolina A&T State University for the 10 a.m. announcement.

Four hours later, Lt. Gov. Dan Forest will join Sen. Jerry Tillman, R-Randolph, chief education budget writer in the Senate, in Raleigh to ‘unveil a new fund to supplement teacher pay in North Carolina public schools.’

Talk about the right hand not keeping up with the left (or, in this case, the right hand not keeping up with the extreme right). Of course, it’s been common knowledge in Raleigh for a long time that Forest is the darling of the Tea Party/religious right crowd and that he has been building a network of supporters to help him run for Governor in 2020 (or maybe even 2016 if McCrory continues to falter). Could it be that the contest between these two will begin today with, ironically enough, competing proposals over teacher pay — a subject over which the GOP has been pummeled for its budget-slashing policies? Stay tuned — it could be that an interesting next chapter in state policy wars is about to begin.

Here’s a story that’s unfortunately gotten very little, if any, play in the North Carolina mainstream news media. It comes, interestingly enough, from national NBC News:

“How politics buries science in landslide mapping

The six geologists were just starting their work, climbing the mountains of Western North Carolina to map the debris left behind by landslides over millions of years, when the political footing gave way beneath them. Opposition had been building from real estate agents, from home builders planning subdivisions, and then from politicians. When all that energy was released, the science was crushed flat.

The new Republican leadership in the legislature cut off all funding for the state’s landslide mapping project in 2011, and the five geologists were laid off. They had mapped just four of 19 counties. Only one geologist kept a state job, but he is not allowed to do any landslide mapping. Another is helping a mining company search for gold. Two are in private practice. The fifth is checking the work of road paving crews. And the sixth moved to Virginia, mapping landslides until the temporary funding for that project ran out.

Against the backdrop of the March 22 mudslide in Washington state, which killed 33 people and left 12 still missing as of Monday, geologists say the story of the team in North Carolina illustrates how America has never put forth a serious effort to learn from the earth’s past. Geology experts say science is often a casualty of land politics, as the nation fails to protect others who are unaware they are at risk from deadly landslides….”

Read the rest of this excellent and very disturbing story by clicking here.