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You’ve got to hand it to the right-wing AstroTurf groups like Americans for the Prosperous. These people and the big money plutocrats they shill for won a sweeping victory in the gerrymandered 2012 North Carolina election and they’re still screaming at Governor Perdue and calling her names.

Maybe they just have more money than they know what to do with in their budget line item for “Annoying and Offensive Robocalls” but it really is pretty amazing that these people are going to the trouble of launching a full-fledged P.R. campaign against the Guv for..well…for doing her job. 

In case you missed it,  Read More

It seems like a safe bet that every Governor given the option probably uses it, but there’s something enormously frustrating about Governor Perdue’s penchant for simply taking no action at all on bills sent to her by the General Assembly. This was the approach she took once again this past weekend on a controversial bill opposed by the entire Asheville City Council.

As constitutional scholars out there will no doubt recall, the Governor of North Carolina has three choices when it comes to most of the bills passed by the legislature: 1) sign them, 2) veto them or 3) do nothing — in which case the bill becomes law as if she had signed it.  (Some bills become law immediately without ever being presented to the Governor).

The reasons for the decision to provide option #3 probably appear in the record of the debate surrounding the amendment that gave the Governor the veto back in the 1990′s and I’m willing to be persuaded that they make some kind of sense. But from the perspective of a simple, common sense test, it’s hard tosee what they possibly are.

Legislators have to vote “yes or “no.” Why does the Governor get to vote “present?”

Also, as a practical matter, what in the heck is preventing Perdue from making a “yea” or “nay” decision? After all, she has only four months left to serve. Read More

Maybe there’s something missing from the news reports regarding the recent hubbub over State Auditor Beth Wood’s report on the Alcohol Law Enforcement Section of the state Department of Public Safety, but it sure does seem that, at the least, the folks over at ALE could use a little public relations advice (and, perhaps, a strong word from on high).

Again, maybe I’m missing something, but since when do the heads of state offices like ALE get to hire lawyers who would presume to tell the state Auditor what she can and cannot do about auditing and reporting on that office? And even if they thought Wood was doing something inappropriate, aren’t there some channels to work through? After all, ALE is a section of a state agency that reports to the Governor

I know the Guv has a lot more important things to deal with, but it would seem that she might want to have her staff send a little memo over to ALE folks telling them to get with the program or, at least, come to them first before picking a public fight with another constitutional officer of the state.     

 

Governor Perdue got some undeserved heat last month for suggesting the General Assembly was out to turn North Carolina into Mississippi. A glance at today’s news and events, however, seems to confirm once again that she was on the money.

From the good folks at Think Progress: “Mississippi set to execute most inmates since 1950′s”

From Raleigh’s News & Observer: “Racial Justice Act changes again in committee.”

From today’s NC House calendar: Senate Bill 416: A bill to amend death penalty procedures (i.e. a bill  to repeal the Racial Justice Act and generally make executions easier to obtain and carry out in North Carolina).