Archives

Commentary

The warped ideological prism through which the leaders of the North Carolina Senate view reality continues to give rise to new and maddeningly counterproductive policy proposals. The latest came yesterday afternoon when, fresh off of wrecking the state revenue picture for years and handicapping core services like education, the courts and environmental protection with the regressive 2013 tax package, senators proposed another round of corporate tax cuts.

As Alexandra Sirota of the Budget and Tax Center explained it rather politely last night, this is the absolute last thing North Carolina needs right now:

“The corporate tax cuts in the Senate’s proposal would further reduce revenue for investments in our public schools and universities and other building blocks that help drive the success of businesses. Businesses need an educated workforce and modern infrastructure to be successful. Cuts to the tax rates for profitable corporations or changes to the way corporate income is considered for purposes of taxation also won’t address falling wages for the average North Carolinian. Furthermore, the Senate proposal changes to taxes paid by profitable multi-state corporations would not guarantee reinvest in our state and be at the expense of small, home-grown North Carolina businesses.”

In other (and less gracious words), the Senate’s unrequited love affair with trickledown economics continues and will, if unchecked, continue to spur North Carolina’s ongoing and destructive spiral back down into the realm of its backward neighbors like Tennessee, South Carolina, Alabama and Mississippi.

 

Uncategorized

Thom TillisNorth Carolina House Speaker Thom Tillis headlined a press event at the General Assembly this morning that was supposed to be about kicking off the 2014 legislative session but that, at times, felt a lot like a part of Tillis’ U.S. Senate campaign.

There will plenty of time for dissecting the details of what was said at the event, but there was at least one familiar conservative talking point repeated by Tillis that deserves to be debunked immediately and often.

Namely, it is utterly absurd for legislative conservatives (or anyone else for that matter) to argue — as the Speaker did at at least one point — that Democrats imposed more significant cuts on state services (like public education) back in 2009 and 2010 than have been imposed since the GOP assumed control of the General Assembly  in 2011 and the Governor’s mansion in 2013. This is like blaming FDR for the plunge in federal spending during the Great Depression.

Earth to Speaker Tillis: Yes there were large and problematic state budget cuts in 2009 and 2010, but that’s mostly because state revenues had literally dropped like an anvil as a result of the global Great Recession. Read More

Uncategorized

ff-8292013It’s depressing as hell, but everyone who cares about North Carolina public policy should make this new report by the N.C. Budget and Tax Center’s Cedric Johnson: “Who Pays in 2014″ a part of their Tax Day reading list.

As Johnson reports:

“Changes are coming to who pays taxes in North Carolina, and the news is not good for middle- and low-income taxpayers. This tax season marks the final year taxpayers will file their income taxes under the state’s old tax code and by next year it will be apparent to many taxpayers that the tax plan has not just reduced available dollars for investing in core public services, but also has increased the tax load for many. Read More

Uncategorized

The tax deal authored by Gov. McCrory and legislative leaders may be on the way to becoming law, but it is being greeted with great skepticism by folks in the know.

Raleigh’s News & Observer:

“This is not reform. This is not revising the tax code to plug holes and ensure fairness and create a system whereby there is reliable revenue from one year to the next. This is simply cutting taxes for the people most able to pay them and pandering to the business lobby. The governor also continues to hype the notion that, by cutting taxes,North Carolina will signal it is “open for business” and be more competitive with neighboring states.”

The Charlotte Observer: Read More

Uncategorized

New from the numbers wonks at the Budget and Tax Center:

Allowing the state Earned Income Tax Credit to expire would harm veterans, active-duty military, a new analysis finds

RALEIGH (July 2, 2013) – About 64,000 veteran and active-duty military families in North Carolina would be impacted by current tax plans, all of which allow the state’s Earned Income Tax Credit to expire. New analysis by the Washington, D.C.-based Center on Budget and Policy Priorities and state-level analysis by the Budget & Tax Center found that tens of thousands of military families in North Carolina would be affected.

The Senate tax plan (HB 998, Fifth edition) being debated later today allows the state Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) to expire, increasing the tax load on tens of thousands of low-income soldiers, veterans, and their families while the wealthiest taxpayers and profitable corporations get a tax break. Read More