Here’s a spot of good news to brighten a rather dreary Thanksgiving week landscape: a science program at Fayetteville State, one of North Carolina’s network of historically black colleges and universities (HBCU’s) is being celebrated as a national leader. This from an article in the the Fayetteville Observer:

“, a website that tracks forensic science programs, lists FSU as No. 2 among its top 15 programs in the nation, based on teaching hands-on skills with laboratory classes, seminars and internships or field study. The site also looked at facilities, partnerships and career placement opportunities. The website, which is run by an educational publishing company called Sechel Ventures, says it seeks to provide a detailed, researched directory of programs and careers in the forensics field.”

The rating comes as a welcome boost to HBCU’s which have so long suffered from underinvestment and small-to-non-existent campus endowments. The obvious take away: HBCU’s can and often do provide a high quality education to thousands of students. The key is to give the schools the resources and tools they need to survive and thrive. Let’s hope state lawmakers are paying attention.


UNCThree UNC system schools will now be able to admit students with lower SAT scores if their grade point average (GPA) is higher than required. The three year pilot program, approved by the UNC Board of Governors on Friday, will allow North Carolina Central, Elizabeth City State and Fayetteville State Universities to admit students on a sliding scale where the lowest admissions requirement would be an SAT score of 750 and a GPA of 3.0.

The schools selected for the program are all historically black colleges and all suffered enrollment declines when the UNC system raised minimum SAT (and GPA) requirements from 700 to 750 in 2011 and then again to 800 in 2013.

According to data released earlier this month by the National Center for Fair and Open Testing, African American high school seniors scored lower on the SATs than any other race. This is consistent with African American students performance on the SATs for the past twenty years. Yet, historically black colleges tend to always require SAT scores whereas many predominately white universities have made it optional.

One factor that can affect SAT scores is a family’s economic status. Read More


Young voters were a key constituent group in the 2008 presidential election, and they may yet play a key role in not just the presidential race, but also in state and local elections.

To protect the right to vote, students from Shaw University, St. Augustine’s College and N.C. State will speak out at the General Assembly today at 1 pm against voter suppression through stringent Voter ID laws.

Meanwhile, a separate effort by The Student Engagement and Empowerment Network (SEEN), a network of historically Black colleges and universities in North Carolina, aims to draw out young voters during the early voting period leading up to election day on May 8.

For this campaign, SEEN is partnering with N.C. spoken word and hip hop artists to produce videos and performances, engaging the youth in awareness of and participation in the state and local politics.

Check out this video featuring spoken artist Poet.She:

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Click here for more information on SEEN’s efforts.