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Medicaid expansionThe drumbeat calling on state leaders to reverse course and accept federal Medicaid dollars in order to provide health insurance to hundreds of thousands of poor North Carolinians continues to grow louder and louder.

As this morning’s Greensboro News & Record editorial argues (after citing a new report by the accounting firm Jackson-Hewitt that the failure to expand will lead to tens of millions of dollars in tax penalties for North Carolina businesses):

“A society and an economy are stronger when people are healthier. Expanding Medicaid coverage could help North Carolina achieve that goal. If that could spare employers tens of millions of dollars in tax penalties at the same time, our pro-business governor should explore that opportunity.”

Meanwhile, be sure to check out this essay by Duke writer and doctor Laura Musselwhite in  Raleigh’s News & Observer in which she points out: Read More

Blue CrossWe’ve often given Blue Cross Blue Shield of North Carolina a hard time down through the years here at The Pulse, but today the insurance giant deserves credit for admitting it screwed up and taking action to correct its recent error of cancelling polices of same-sex couples.

According to BCBSNC boss Brad Wilson: “We should have more thoughtfully considered this decision, with full appreciation of the impact it would have on same-sex married couples and domestic partners. We’re sorry we failed to do so.”

Good for Wilson and BCBSNC. You can read the company’s entire statement by clicking here.

The people with the best jobs on the Internets (i.e. the writers at The Onion) have put together an excellent summary of where things currently stand when it come to the implementation of the Affordable Care Act:

Nation Recalls Simpler Time When Health Care System Was Broken Beyond Repair

WASHINGTON—With the Affordable Care Act now making it possible for a greater number of Americans to purchase medical coverage, the nation looked back this week and fondly recalled a simpler time when its health care system was broken beyond any hope of repair. Read More

A state legislative committee is looking into the situation in the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services this morning, where embattled Secretary Aldona Wos continues to hang on and adhere to her controversial plan to privatize Medicaid, the state’s health insurance system for poor people.

Throughout her first year in office, Wos and her boss, Gov. McCrory, have repeatedly claimed that Medicaid is “broken” and that spending in the program is “out of control.” This new chart highlighted at today’s hearing, however, makes clear that Wos and McCrory may have some backtracking to do with respect to these claims (Note that the red line is the national trend and the blue is North Carolina’s. “PMPM” means “per member, per month.”):Medicaid spending

 

Alex Kotch(Cross-posted from the website Vocativ.com)

Obamacare is actually good. No, really

By Alex Kotch

I’m a low-income PhD student with a shaky health history and limited earning capacity. The Affordable Care Act should improve my quality of life. But will it?

This isn’t the answer you tend to hear on the news, but yeah, it will. Dramatically.

Here’s my background. I’m a 30-year-old, soon-to-be PhD graduate with an expected income in 2014, the first year of Obamacare, not much above the minimum wage. My $190-a-month student health plan runs out the day Obamacare starts. I’m a nonsmoker, but I have had some serious health issues in the past. In the eyes of health insurers, I’m hardly a solid bet. So Obamacare should, if it’s fit for purpose, help me out of a bind when I go to change my plan. Let’s see if that holds up. Read More