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Health-Reform-SBAs Adam Linker explained last week when he debunked the latest conservative mythology surrounding the Affordable Care Act, the law continues to succeed despite its imperfections and the endless, hysterical attacks of the President’s political opponents.

Today, there’s still more confirmation of this undeniable reality from Washington state. As The Olympian reported this morning, the state’s uninsured rate has been plummeting:

State insurance officials say fewer than 9 percent of Washington residents still don’t have health insurance.

That’s a significant improvement from numbers before the Affordable Care Act went into effect.

The state Office of the Insurance Commissioner counted 970,000 uninsured Washington residents last year. That number is now 600,000 or about 8.65 percent of the state population.

Agency spokeswoman Stephanie Marquis told The Olympian (http://is.gd/p2XsBG ) two factors are driving the improvement: enrollment in Medicaid and sign-ups for private insurance, but inside and outside of the new state health insurance exchange.

The insurance department reports the individual market has grown to more than 327,000 policies. That represents about 81,000 more insured people than before Oct. 1, when Washington’s Health Benefit Exchange opened.

The exchange also helped sign up nearly 350,000 people for free insurance through Medicaid.

Despite the many successes here, at last check, North Carolina’s uninsured rate remains significantly higher.

Last October Gov. McCrory caused a stir, and raised some eyebrows, when he said that the state may be forced to expand Medicaid due to a “new” regulation.

The policy to which he was referring is called presumptive eligibility. Presumptive eligibility allows states to give permission to hospitals and other providers to temporarily enroll certain people in Medicaid. North Carolina, for example, allows presumptive eligibility for pregnant women. That means if a hospital does an initial check and it looks like a pregnant woman is likely to qualify for Medicaid then the hospital can temporarily enroll her and get paid for the services it provides. Meanwhile, an application for full Medicaid can be processed without a disruption in care.

This policy is critical for ensuring that patients get care and providers get paid.

In states with efficient systems that can process Medicaid eligibility in real time, this temporary measure is not as important. In states where parents are having to ration medicine for their children due to a backlog in processing Medicaid applications, presumptive eligibility is a critical tool.

Health reform gave hospitals more latitude to presumptively enroll patients, even if the state has not granted the hospital permission to participate in the program. Other providers, notably Community Health Centers, however, are still not able to use presumptive eligibility to enroll children in Medicaid. The Community Health Centers are still limited to enrolling pregnant women.

Ultimately, the state needs to fix its computer system. In the meantime, we need to get care to children. We could start by granting Community Health Centers, and possibly other providers, the ability to temporarily enroll likely eligible kids in Medicaid while DHHS clears its application bottle neck.

And until the state expands Medicaid to all low-income people we will need every splint and bandage we can find to patch our broken system.

 

 

As we reported last week nearly 360,000 people have enrolled in health insurance plans through the federal Marketplace established by the Affordable Care Act in North Carolina. According to the federal data, 91 percent of these enrollees will receive financial help to pay their premiums.

Although impressive, this top line number does not tell the full story.

The fact sheets released by Health & Human Services also show that 74 percent of North Carolinians purchasing coverage through the Marketplace chose a Silver plan. As many people now know, insurance plans were listed on the federal website according to metal levels. These metal levels correspond to different cost sharing requirements. So an insurance policy that pays about 60 percent of costs is rated “Bronze,” and a plan that pays out 70 percent of costs is ranked as a “Silver” policy.

For individuals and families earning less than 250 percent of federal poverty level, about $58,000 for a family of four, Silver plans provide additional financial assistance by capping deductibles and co-insurance. That means the federal government will not only help with premiums, it will also ensure that families are not left with financially catastrophic deductibles.

The high rate of enrollment in Silver plans should be some comfort to physicians and hospitals that worried about patients facing unaffordable deductibles.

North Carolina’s robust enrollment figures, and the demographics of the enrollees, are good news for the stability of the state’s insurance market. Navigators, health insurance agents and brokers, providers and insurance companies all played a major part in driving consumers to the Affordable Care Act Marketplace. The state’s largest insurer, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina, had a lot at stake.

BCBSNC was the only company to offer plans in every county. Weak enrollment would have meant a small pool of customers for the insurance company. With a modest customer base a few sick enrollees could drive up premiums for everyone. A large number of enrollees, on the other hand, means more stable and predictable costs for the company and should moderate premium hikes when new rates are released later this year.

There is also a good age mix among enrollees through the Marketplace in North Carolina. Insurers and analysts often draw arbitrary lines when setting age targets for enrollment. But, generally, younger people use fewer health services so insurance companies need them to offset the older folks to create a balanced pool of customers. Oftentimes analysts look at the percentage of enrollees younger than 35.

In North Carolina, 35 percent of enrollees are younger than 35. Also, 54 percent of enrollees are under the age of 45, what some may consider roughly middle aged.

So what is the bottom line from these figures? Obamacare will not, as critics charged, collapse under its own weight or create what some in the insurance industry call a “death spiral.” In fact, more insurance companies may see the success we’ve had in North Carolina and get into the market.

Also, it is critical to remember that those calling for the repeal of health reform are trying to transport us back to the bad old days when pregnancy was a pre-existing condition and insurance companies could deny coverage to uninsured customers for a broad range of reasons.

Instead of attempting to take coverage from 360,000 North Carolinians legislators should work to improve a law that is already working in our state.

 

In case you missed it over the weekend, Raleigh’s News & Observer hit the nail on the head Sunday morning with this lead editorial entitled “The Affordable Care Act surpasses goals in NC”. Today’s Fitzsimon File “Monday Numbers” edition provides further confirmation. This is from the editorial:

“To hear the Republican candidates for the U.S. Senate in North Carolina tell it, “Obamacare” is about the worst thing that ever happened to the people of America and certainly North Carolina. They’ll repeal and replace it, they say, or certainly repeal it, and leave consumers to the wonderful world of the free market….

But here’s the problem with the Republican rant. It has been outrun by Obamacare’s successes. Read More

Health-Reform-SBHere’s this morning’s most important and thus far under-reported news story in North Carolina: the huge spike in enrollment numbers in health insurance as the result of the Affordable Care Act.

This is from a story (buried on the business page, for some reason) in Raleigh’s News & Observer:

“North Carolina enrollments for health insurance surged to 357,000 as tens of thousands of residents signed up for subsidized coverage in the final weeks of eligibility, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services said Thursday.

The late rush of insurance enrollments under the Affordable Care Act elevates North Carolina to the fifth-highest slot in the nation, surpassing most expectations for the law’s first year of enrollment, particularly in a Republican-controlled state that did not run its own insurance exchange.

Enrollments here represent a third of the state population eligible for health insurance, and are expected to take a significant chunk out of North Carolina’s uninsured population, which was 17 percent in 2012. Almost all of North Carolina’s enrollments came with federal subsidies for the applicants, suggesting that many of those signing up had been unable to afford coverage in the past.”

Moreover, another 74,000 have been obtained coverage under Medicaid. As Chris Fitzsimon notes this morning in Friday Follies, despite all of the imperfections and all of the relentless opposition and innumerable obstructions thrown at the ACA by the ideologues on the right, President Obama and the other architects of health care reform have fashioned a remarkable achievement — they have dramatically improved the lives of millions of Americans (including more than 430,000 North Carolinians) in a profound and irreversible way.

No wonder conservative politicians are getting more and more concerned about the political implications of their ongoing and increasingly futile efforts to oppose and repeal the ACA.

Read more here: http://www.newsobserver.com/2014/05/01/3825943/nc-enrollments-for-subsidized.html?sp=/99/104/#storylink=cpy