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Anna and Mark’s great story of how they finally got affordable health coverage is detailed in a post by Lauren Chesson at the NC Council of Churches.  Chesson describes how serious pre-existing health conditions eventually made health coverage completely unaffordable for these two self-employed professionals but, with the Affordable Care Act, they are now able to get quality coverage:

Unfortunately, the cost of premiums to cover Anna became so unmanageable that they had to drop her coverage, even though she also would be considered as having a pre-existing condition if they sought insurance in the future. They both waited eagerly for a year and a half for the implementation of the Health Insurance Marketplaces through the Affordable Care Act, when they could no longer be denied health insurance for pre-existing conditions and would have an opportunity to access a premium tax credit.  [Read the full post here.]

 

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Today’s News and Observer story by John Murawski says it all about the NC General Assembly’s anti-Affordable Care Act hearing yesterday and the bias of Chris Conover, the hearing’s star “ACA expert” whose recent writings include accusing  President Obama of being a “fascist”:

conover story front

 

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Smoking banWe told you so.

The Wilmington Star-News reminds us this morning of something that common sense made clear years ago – namely that the silly, Chicken Little complaints from the right wing about North Carolina’s ban on smoking in restaurants and bars a couple years back were just that. To quote the Star-News:

“Fear is a powerful force, but it often is exercised prematurely and, in hindsight, without justification. That was certainly true in the case of North Carolina’s hard-fought ban on smoking in bars, restaurants and other public buildings.

When the state that King Tobacco once ruled went smoke-free four years ago, there was a predictable if understandable outcry from some bar and restaurant owners, who worried that business would plummet if people couldn’t smoke inside. It didn’t happen, much in keeping with the experiences of other states that have implemented public smoking bans.

People still eat out. They still go to bars. And maybe even in some cases, these establishments have attracted new patrons because smoking is not allowed.”

To make things even better, the smoking ban has had a wonderfully beneficial impact on health Read More

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From the good folks at the NC Alliance for Health:

Raleigh – Fifteen years after the 1998 state tobacco settlement, North Carolina ranks 45th in the nation in funding programs to prevent kids from smoking and help smokers quit, according to a national report released by a coalition of public health organizations.

North Carolina currently spends $1.2 million a year on tobacco prevention and cessation programs, which is 1.1 percent of the $106.8 million recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Read More

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From Guest Blogger Cathy Hope of the Georgetown Center for Children and Families.  (See her original post here.)

Whenever I read stories about the sticker shock that may hit some consumers when the Affordable Care Act takes effect, it reminds me that buying insurance can be more mystifying than buying a new car.  There have been so many jalopies being sold in “mint condition” in the wild west of the insurance market for so long that it’s going to take some time for consumers to realize how much better the insurance products will be once the ACA consumer protections take full effect.

They will finally be getting what they are paying for – coverage that will cover essential health needs and won’t disappear when they need it most.  Don’t forget, there will be other important features included in next year’s models (in other words improvements brought about by the ACA market reforms such as the elimination of pre-existing condition discrimination and gender-based rating.)

These sticker price narratives also often ignore the fact that many people won’t be paying the full sticker price because they will be eligible for federal tax credits and/or cost-sharing protections offered by the ACA to offset the cost of insurance.   A new report from the Kaiser Family Foundation found that 48% of people now buying their own insurance would be eligible for a tax credit that would offset their premium. Among the approximately half of current enrollees who will be eligible for tax credits, the average subsidy would be $5,548 per family, which would reduce their premium for the second-lowest-cost silver premium by an average of 66%.

So the next time you hear the refrain that insurance coverage will cost more under the ACA, ask yourself more expensive than what and are the premium tax credits and cost-sharing protections being taken into account?